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104 records – page 1 of 11.

[Acute delusional psychosis and neuroleptic malignant syndrome after emigration of a Russian German patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208497
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 1997 May;24(3):147-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J. Podschus
J. Kirsch
R. van Heys
B. Winzer
Author Affiliation
Psychiatrische Klinik Intensiv- und Kriseninterventionsstation Freie Universität Berlin.
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 1997 May;24(3):147-9
Date
May-1997
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Delusions - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Germany
Haloperidol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Methotrimeprazine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Paranoid Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
Emigration is often followed by psychic disorders. The special issue of Germans from the GUS-States immigrating to Germany is presented. The modus of paranoid reaction is discussed along the biography and the criteria of ICD 10. The acute paranoid psychosis was complicated by a neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
PubMed ID
9273559 View in PubMed
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Alternative explanation for similarities between Native Americans and Siberians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206390
Source
Hum Biol. 1998 Feb;70(1):137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998

Alu insertion polymorphisms in Native Americans and related Asian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169340
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2006 Mar-Apr;33(2):142-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jaqueline Battilana
Nelson J R Fagundes
Ana H Heller
Angela Goldani
Loreta B Freitas
Eduardo Tarazona-Santos
Batmunkh Munkhbat
Namid Munkhtuvshin
Mlu Krylov
Lidia Benevolenskaia
Frank C Arnett
Mark A Batzer
Prescott L Deininger
Francisco M Salzano
Sandro L Bonatto
Author Affiliation
Centro de Biologia Genômica e Molecular, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Faculdade de Biociências, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2006 Mar-Apr;33(2):142-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alu Elements - genetics
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Emigration and Immigration - history
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic markers
Genetics, Population
Heterozygote
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Indians, South American - genetics
Male
Mutagenesis, Insertional
Polymorphism, Genetic
Principal Component Analysis
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
Alu insertions provide useful markers for the study of inter-population affinities and historical processes, but data on these systems are not numerous in Native Americans and related populations.
The study aimed to answer the following questions: (a) do the population relationships found agree with ethnic, historical and geographical data? and (b) what can heterozygote levels and associated results inform us about the events that led to the colonization of the New World?
Twelve Alu insertion polymorphisms were studied in 330 individuals belonging to South American Native, Siberian and Mongolian populations. These data were integrated with those from 526 persons, to ascertain the relationships between Asian, Northern Arctic and Amerindian populations.
A decreasing trend concerning heterozygosities and amount of gene flow was observed in the three sets, in the order indicated above. Most results indicated the validity of these subdivisions. However, no clear structure could be observed within South American Natives, indicating the importance of dispersive (genetic drift, founder effects) factors in their differentiation.
The answers to the questions are: (a) yes; and (b) an initial moderate bottleneck, intensified by more recent historical events (isolation and inbreeding), can explain the current Amerindian pattern of diversity.
PubMed ID
16684689 View in PubMed
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Ancient human genome sequence of an extinct Palaeo-Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98088
Source
Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):757-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2010
Author
Morten Rasmussen
Yingrui Li
Stinus Lindgreen
Jakob Skou Pedersen
Anders Albrechtsen
Ida Moltke
Mait Metspalu
Ene Metspalu
Toomas Kivisild
Ramneek Gupta
Marcelo Bertalan
Kasper Nielsen
M Thomas P Gilbert
Yong Wang
Maanasa Raghavan
Paula F Campos
Hanne Munkholm Kamp
Andrew S Wilson
Andrew Gledhill
Silvana Tridico
Michael Bunce
Eline D Lorenzen
Jonas Binladen
Xiaosen Guo
Jing Zhao
Xiuqing Zhang
Hao Zhang
Zhuo Li
Minfeng Chen
Ludovic Orlando
Karsten Kristiansen
Mads Bak
Niels Tommerup
Christian Bendixen
Tracey L Pierre
Bjarne Grønnow
Morten Meldgaard
Claus Andreasen
Sardana A Fedorova
Ludmila P Osipova
Thomas F G Higham
Christopher Bronk Ramsey
Thomas V O Hansen
Finn C Nielsen
Michael H Crawford
Søren Brunak
Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén
Richard Villems
Rasmus Nielsen
Anders Krogh
Jun Wang
Eske Willerslev
Author Affiliation
Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark and Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):757-62
Date
Feb-11-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cryopreservation
Emigration and Immigration - history
Extinction, Biological
Genetics, Population
Genome, Human - genetics
Genomics
Genotype
Greenland
Hair
History, Ancient
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an amount close to the practical limit of current sequencing technologies. We identify 353,151 high-confidence single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 6.8% have not been reported previously. We estimate raw read contamination to be no higher than 0.8%. We use functional SNP assessment to assign possible phenotypic characteristics of the individual that belonged to a culture whose location has yielded only trace human remains. We compare the high-confidence SNPs to those of contemporary populations to find the populations most closely related to the individual. This provides evidence for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit.
Notes
RefSource: Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):739-40
PubMed ID
20148029 View in PubMed
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Arctic indigenous youth resilience and vulnerability: comparative analysis of adolescent experiences across five circumpolar communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268818
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):735-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Olga Ulturgasheva
Stacy Rasmus
Lisa Wexler
Kristine Nystad
Michael Kral
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):735-56
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Alaska - ethnology
Arctic regions - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Norway - ethnology
Resilience, Psychological
Siberia - ethnology
Social Support
Abstract
Arctic peoples today find themselves on the front line of rapid environmental change brought about by globalizing forces, shifting climates, and destabilizing physical conditions. The weather is not the only thing undergoing rapid change here. Social climates are intrinsically connected to physical climates, and changes within each have profound effects on the daily life, health, and well-being of circumpolar indigenous peoples. This paper describes a collaborative effort between university researchers and community members from five indigenous communities in the circumpolar north aimed at comparing the experiences of indigenous Arctic youth in order to come up with a shared model of indigenous youth resilience. The discussion introduces a sliding scale model that emerged from the comparative data analysis. It illustrates how a "sliding scale" of resilience captures the inherent dynamism of youth strategies for "doing well" and what forces represent positive and negative influences that slide towards either personal and communal resilience or vulnerability. The model of the sliding scale is designed to reflect the contingency and interdependence of resilience and vulnerability and their fluctuations between lowest and highest points based on timing, local situation, larger context, and meaning.
PubMed ID
25217145 View in PubMed
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[Association of chromosome 8q24 variants with prostate cancer risk in the Siberian region of Russia and meta-analysis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123748
Source
Mol Biol (Mosk). 2012 Mar-Apr;46(2):234-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
N A Os'kina
U A Boiarskikh
A F Lazarev
V D Petrova
D I Ganov
O G Tonacheva
G I Lifshits
M L Filipenko
Source
Mol Biol (Mosk). 2012 Mar-Apr;46(2):234-41
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8 - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prostatic Neoplasms - ethnology - genetics
Risk factors
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
Compelling evidence demonstrates chromosome 8q24 as a prostate cancer susceptibility locus. In present work we studied whether the common variants of 8q24 region, rs6983267 and rs1447295, were associated with the sporadic prostate cancer risk in the Russian population. Polymorphisms were genotyped in 393 case and 384 control Russian Caucasian men from Siberia region. The A allele of rs1447295 was significantly associated with the risk of prostate cancer (OR[CI 95%] = 1.74 [1.26-2.4], p = 7.8 x 10(-4)). A common G-A haplotype for rs6983267 - rs1447295 also showed an association with prostate cancer risk in Russian population (OR[CI 95%] = 2.03 [1.1 - 3.75], p = 0.02). We performed a meta-analysis combining our results with previous studies to evaluate the association between studied SNPs and prostate cancer risk. Meta-analysis has strongly supported the association for these SNPs (p
PubMed ID
22670519 View in PubMed
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Attaining khinem: challenges, coping strategies and resilience among Eveny adolescents in northeastern Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268827
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):632-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Olga Ulturgasheva
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):632-50
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Adolescent Development
Arctic regions - ethnology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Miners
Resilience, Psychological
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
This article examines challenges, coping strategies, and resilience among Eveny adolescents in northeastern Siberia. It explores situations which the study participants associate with challenge and hardship, namely their experiences of transition from life in the family reindeer herding camp to schooling at the age of 7, bullying, boredom, and violence. By situating the data within the Eveny framework of resilience (khinem), the study provides the ethnographic context for coping strategies and efforts (e.g., sharing, inter- and intragenerational support, availability of safe homes) undertaken by the community in order to mitigate the situations of risk and hardship and to facilitate adolescents' resilience. The account emphasizes that instead of identifying adolescents as either resilient or vulnerable, it is necessary to explore culturally specific processes and practices which potentially contribute to their acquisition of resilience.
PubMed ID
25116205 View in PubMed
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[Attitude towards psychotherapy in the Russian population and in the population with a Russian/Soviet cultural background in Germany. A pilot study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175668
Source
Nervenarzt. 2006 Jan;77(1):64-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
D. Ditte
W. Schulz
G. Schmid-Ott
Author Affiliation
Institut für Psychologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
Source
Nervenarzt. 2006 Jan;77(1):64-72
Date
Jan-2006
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy
Questionnaires
Siberia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We assumed that persons with a Russian/Soviet cultural background have a more skeptical attitude towards psychotherapy than persons with a German background because of the poor distribution of psychotherapy and the knowledge about this kind of treatment in Russia.
We compared the views of Russian probands (n=40), Russian migrants living in Germany (n=65) and German probands (n=70) with the "Questionnaire on Attitudes towards Psychotherapeutic Treatment" (QAPT). For the study of the Russian probands we translated the questionnaire into the Russian language.
The psychometric examination predominantly suggests the quality of the Russian version of the QAPT. Russian probands showed a more skeptical attitude towards psychotherapy compared to the German probands. The migrants had a tendentially more negative attitude than the Germans and a more positive attitude than the Russians. However, we could not determine any differences concerning the anticipated social acceptance regarding participation in psychotherapy.
The results suggest the relevance of culture-specific factors in psychotherapy and an increased need for information of persons with a Russian/Soviet cultural background about psychotherapy.
PubMed ID
15776258 View in PubMed
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Basal metabolic rate in the Yakut (Sakha) of Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6646
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2005 Mar-Apr;17(2):155-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
J Josh Snodgrass
William R Leonard
Larissa A Tarskaia
Vasili P Alekseev
Vadim G Krivoshapkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. j-snodgrass@northwestern.edu
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2005 Mar-Apr;17(2):155-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
Human indigenous circumpolar populations have elevated basal metabolic rates (BMRs) relative to predicted values; this metabolic elevation has been postulated to be a physiological adaptation to chronic and severe cold stress. The present study examines BMR in the Yakut, an indigenous high-latitude population from the Sakha Republic of Russia to determine (1) whether the Yakut show evidence of an elevated BMR, (2) if the Yakut display evidence of age-related changes in BMR, and (3) whether lifestyle differences influence BMR. BMR was measured during the late summer in 75 women and 50 men (ages 18-56 years) from the Siberian village of Berdygestiakh. Measured BMR (+/- SEM) of the entire sample was significantly elevated (+6.5%) compared to predictions based on body mass (6,623.7 +/- 94.9 vs. 6,218.2 +/- 84.7 kJ/day; P
PubMed ID
15736182 View in PubMed
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104 records – page 1 of 11.