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36 records – page 1 of 4.

Acclimatization to cold in man induced by frequent scuba diving in cold water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293858
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1968 Feb;24(2):177-81.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

Activation and suppression of shivering during septal and hypothalamic stimulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298675
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-16. 36 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
REF ALASKA ~c 955 I I U9 no.62 - 16 1962 COPY 1 . - ' AAL-TDR-62-16 ACTIVATION AND SUPPRESSION OF SHIVERING DURING SEPTAL AND HYPOTHALAMIC STIMULATION TECHNICAL DOCUMENTARY REPORT AAL-TDR-62-16 September 1962 ARCTIC AEROMEDICAL LABORATORY AEROSPACE MEDICAL DIV1SION AIR
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Kawamura, Y.
Hemingway, A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-16. 36 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3377461
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Hypothalamus
Brain
Stimulation
Abstract
In acute experiments on 38 lightly anesthetized cats, the septal region of the forebrain and the hypothalamus were explored for loci whose activation by electrical stimulation produced, suppressed or failed to affect shivering. Shivering was consistently and repeatedly produced by stimulation of the dorso-medial region of the posterior hypothalamus, and sometimes by stimulation of the ventrolateral region of the septum. A greater intensity of stimulus was needed to produce more latent and less intense shivering during septal than during hypothalamic stimulation. Similarly, more intense stimulation was necessary to suppress shivering during ventromedial septal stimulation than during anterior, or ventrolateral posterior hypothalamic stimulation. The most effective stimulation frequency for both activation and suppression of shivering was 50 pulses/sec, i.e. fivefold the evoked or suppressed limb tremor frequency. On the basis of these results it was concluded that septa! influences on shivering are secondary to a primary hypothalamic modulation of this tremor. Such modulation appears to be more concerned with initiation and maintenance than with the rhythm of shivering.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-16
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[Bröms' drops--a home remedy for upset stomach and shivering (Swen Bröms)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57310
Source
Lakartidningen. 1987 Dec 16;84(51):4358-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1987
Source
Pages 231-238 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
insulation, an increased respiratory heat loss, an increased air or water movement over the body surface. and a pumping of air or water beneath the clothing. Shivering can generate heat at a rate of 10 to 15 kJ/min, but it impairs skilled performance, while the resultant glycogen depletion hastens the
  1 document  
Author
Shephard, R.J.
Goode, R.C.
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education and Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada
Source
Pages 231-238 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acclimatization
Cold adaptation
Energy balance
Fat loss
Glycogen loss
Heat production
Homeothermic system
Metabolism
Non-shivering thermogenesis
Shivering
Thermal equilibrium
Thermographic studies
Voluntary activity
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Cold-adaptive modifications in man induced by repeated short-term cold-exposures and during a 10-day and-night cold-exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293860
Source
Pflugers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology. 1976 May 12;363(2):125-33.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
Brück, K.
Baum, E.
Schwennicke, H.P.
Source
Pflugers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology. 1976 May 12;363(2):125-33.
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Adult
Basal Metabolism
Body Temperature Regulation
Female
Humans
Hypothermia/physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Shivering
Thermosensing
Time Factors
Abstract
Two types of cold exposures were carried out in humans. A. Fourteen subjects were exposed 4-7 times within 2 weeks to the following conditions: ambient temperature was decreased from 28 degrees C to between plus and minus 5 degrees C; the subjects wore a bathing suit and remained in a resting position during the exposure which lasted for 1h. B. Nine conscripts were studied before and after a 10-day exercise, during which they were exposed to moderately cold conditions during day and night. The exercise did not require increased physical activity. In two thirds of the subjects A, metabolic reactions and shivering threshold were shifted to a lower weighted mean body temperature as well as a lower esophageal temperature ("hypothermic" type of adaptation). This modification in the thermoregulatory system was linked with a reduction in thermal discomfort and cold sensation. No change was found in the resting metabolic rate nor was there any indication of the development of non-shivering thermogenesis. Similar modifications were found in 4 of the 9 soldiers (study B). These 4, however, had particularly high shivering thresholds before the 10-day exercise and the values found thereafter were no lower than those found in the remaining five and in the subjects of group A before the cold-exposure regimen.
PubMed ID
945546 View in PubMed
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Commentaries -- Biorhythms, cold physiology, and pathology

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94097
Source
Pages 71-77 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
exposed to cold at -20°c the rectal temperature did not de- crease at least for 100 min. Non-shivering thennogenesis was elevated, as indicated by less decrease in rectal tempera- ture when exposed to cold after curare treatment. However, the mechanism of non-shivering thennoqenesis in the adapted rats
  1 document  
Source
Pages 71-77 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Brown adipose tissue (BAT)
Cardiovascular response
Cold acclimation
Cold diuresis
Cortisol
Inguinal white fat (IWF)
Linoleic Acid
Linolenic acid
Muscular activity
Non-shivering thermogenesis
Norepinephrine infusion
Palmitic Acid
Palmitoleic acid
Perirenal white fat (PWF)
Rectal temperature
Renal response
Skin temperatures
Sleep pattern
Notes
"Renal response and lipid change during cold acclimation of rodents" (G.E. Folk, Jr. and J.J. Berberich)
"Physiological responses to cooling of the face" (J. LeBlanc)
"Adaptive changes in rats reared in cold for successive generations" (S. Itoh, K. Moriya, and H. Maekubo)
"Seasonal patterns of sleep stages and secretion of cortisol and growth hormone during 24-hour periods in northern Norway" (Elliot D. Weitzman, Andries S. deGraaf, Jon F. Sassin, Tormar Hansen, Ole B. Godtlibsen, and Leon Hellman)
"Protection against extreme cold - 10 clo of insulation?" (R.F. Goldman)
"Thermographic (infrared) evaluation of frostbite" (M.P. Hamlet)
"Circadian and seasonal hormone cycles in Caucasian males in the arctic and subarctic" (Betty Anne Philip and Donald E. Roberts)
"Biorhythmologic study of man's adaptation to the conditions of the Far North" (M.G. Kolpakov)
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Comparison in men of physiological responses to exercise of increasing intensity at low and moderate ambient temperatures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50293
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1991;62(5):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
B. Kruk
H. Pekkarinen
K. Manninen
O. Hänninen
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw.
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1991;62(5):353-7
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body temperature
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shivering - physiology
Sweating - physiology
Temperature
Abstract
In six male subjects the sweating thresholds, heart rate (fc), as well as the metabolic responses to exercise of different intensities [40%, 60% and 80% maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)], were compared at ambient temperatures (Ta) of 5 degrees C (LT) and 24 degrees C (MT). Each period of exercise was preceded by a rest period at the same temperature. In LT experiments, the subjects rested until shivering occurred and in MT experiments the rest period was made to be of exactly equivalent length. Oxygen uptake (VO2) at the end of each rest period was higher in LT than MT (P less than 0.05). During 20-min exercise at 40% VO2max performed in the cold no sweating was recorded, while at higher exercise intensities sweating occurred at similar rectal temperatures (Tre) but at lower mean skin (Tsk) and mean body temperatures (Tb) in LT than MT experiments (P less than 0.001). The exercise induced VO2 increase was greater only at the end of the light (40% VO2max) exercise in the cold in comparison with MT (P less than 0.001). Both fc and blood lactate concentration [1a]b were lower at the end of LT than MT for moderate (60% VO2max) and heavy (80% VO2max) exercises. It was concluded that the sweating threshold during exercise in the cold environment had shifted towards lower Tb and Tsk. It was also found that subjects exposed to cold possessed a potentially greater ability to exercise at moderate and high intensities than those at 24 degrees C since the increases in Tre, fc and [1a]b were lower at the lower Ta.
PubMed ID
1874242 View in PubMed
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The effect of induced hypoxia on thermoregulation and cardiopulmonary function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298678
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-19. 46 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
, neutral and cold environ- m. ments. Hypoxia acts differently to heat conservation (shivering) and heat dissipation (thermal panting) mech- I IV. anisms: the former is suppressed, while the latter is facilitated. It is also found that the suppression of IV. shivering is partly due to the hypocapnia
  1 document  
Author
Lim, T.P.K.
Luft, U.C.
Author Affiliation
Lovelace Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-19. 46 p.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3484881
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Dogs
Cold Temperature
Hypoxia
Heat production (biology)
Shivering
Exposure
Heart
Lungs
Abstract
The effect of induced hypoxia on body temperature regulation and cardiopulmonary function is assessed in anesthetized dogs under warm, neutral and cold environments. Hypoxia acts differently to heat conservation (shivering) and heat dissipation (thermal panting) mechanisms: the former is suppressed, while the latter is facilitated. It is also found that the suppression of shivering is partly due to the hypocapnia which is produced under hypoxia. The lethal threshold of acutely induced hypoxia is at the inspiratory O2 level of approximately 3 per cent in the neutral and cold environments, whereas it is at 5 per cent in the warm environment. Under hypoxia, the total ventilation is increased two- to threefold. The alveolar ventilation, however, is augmented to a lesser degree with a progressive increase in physiological dead space. Contrary to respiration, the cardiac output is only slightly increased (less than 30 per cent over the control value) under hypoxia.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-19
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Effects of anti- and pseudo- Parkinson drugs on shivering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298676
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-17.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
AAL-TDR-62-17 REF ALASKA RC 955 .U9 no . 62-17 1962 COPY 1 EFFECTS OF ANTl- AND PSEUDO-PARKINSON DRUGS ON SHIVERING TECHNICAL DOCU:tvfENTARY REPORT AAL-TDR-62-17 September 1962 ARCTIC AEROMEDICAL LABORATORY AEROSPACE MEDICAL DIVlSION AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND FORT WAINWRIGHT
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
George, R.
Freeman, W.J.
Hemingway, A.
Price, W.M.
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-17.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1624751
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Atropine
Reserpine
Abstract
Effects of atropine, an anti-Parkinson agent, and reserpine, a pseudo-Parkinson agent, on the intensity of shivering in cats were determined. This intensity was measured by the ratio of shivering oxygen consumption rate (VO2) to resting VO2. At a dose level (5 mg/kg I. P.) in excess of that necessary to suppress Parkinson or experimentally-induced alternating tremor, atropine sulphate had no effect on the intensity of cold-induced shivering. At a dose level of O. 5 mg/kg I. V., reserpine suppressed shivering but evoked an alternating tremor with Parkinson characteristics.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-17
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Effects of anti- and pseudo-Parkinson drugs on shivering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295210
Source
Experimental Neurology. 1961; 4:106-114.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1961
EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY 4, 106-114 (1961) Effects of Anti- and Pseudo-Parkinson Drugs on Shivering D. G. STUART, R. GEORGE, W. J. FREEMAN, A. HEMINGWAY, AND W. M. PRICES Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, California
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
George, R.
Freeman, W.J.
Hemingway, A.
Price, W.M.
Source
Experimental Neurology. 1961; 4:106-114.
Date
1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
518154
Keywords
Atropine
Reserpine
Shivering
Parkinson tremor
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36 records – page 1 of 4.