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[A comparative study of health and liing standard requirements for crew quarters on Italian and other merchant marine ships].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111791
Source
Ann Sanita Pubblica. 1966 Jul-Aug;27(4):803-35
Publication Type
Article

Biofouling of leisure boats as a source of metal pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281338
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan;24(1):997-1006
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Maria Alexandra Bighiu
Ann-Kristin Eriksson-Wiklund
Britta Eklund
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan;24(1):997-1006
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biofouling - prevention & control
Copper - analysis
Disinfectants - chemistry
Leisure Activities
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Paint - analysis
Salinity
Ships - standards
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
The release of harmful metals from antifouling paints to water bodies is a well-known problem. In this study, we measured both the amount of biofouling growth on leisure boats during one season as well as the concentration of metals accumulated by the biofouling matrix. Furthermore, the efficiency of antifouling paints and mechanical boat cleaning as well as the effect of hull colour on biofouling were evaluated. Unlike paint residues, biofouling waste has never been regarded as a source of metal contamination and has previously been neglected in the scientific literature. Our results revealed that the biofouling waste contained very high concentrations of metals, up to 28,000 mg copper/kg dw and 171,000 mg zinc/kg dw, which exceeds the guidance values for least sensitive land use in Sweden by factors of 140 and 340, respectively. This observation is important because the contaminated biofouling waste is commonly disposed of in boatyard soils at the end of each season, thus increasing the levels of metal pollution. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the amount of biofouling if the boats were coated with copper or zinc containing paints or no paint at all, indicating that biocide paints might not be necessary in low-salinity areas such as the Stockholm archipelago. For boats that were not painted at all during the season, those washed on boat washers (mechanically) had on average half of the amount of biofouling compared to boats that were not cleaned mechanically. The results of the study indicate the importance of proper management of biofouling waste as well as the use of more environmentally friendly removal methods for biofouling such as boat washers.
Notes
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2013 Mar;32(3):487-923418041
Cites: Talanta. 2015 Jan;131:372-825281117
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2011 Oct;62(10):2137-4421820680
Cites: Biofouling. 2009 Oct;25(7):633-4420183122
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2014 Oct 1;494-495:313-925062307
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Cites: Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2012 Aug;82:80-422721843
Cites: Environ Int. 2008 Feb;34(2):292-30817959247
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2010 Feb;60(2):159-7120060546
Cites: Biofouling. 2010 Jan;26(1):47-5620390556
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Cites: Environ Pollut. 2001;111(1):117-2611202705
Cites: Exp Toxicol Pathol. 2012 Nov;64(7-8):861-621478002
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Cites: Environ Manage. 2014 May;53(5):930-4624563015
Cites: Chemosphere. 2005 Apr;59(5):585-9215792656
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Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2014 Nov;166:96-10425051304
Cites: Biofouling. 2006;22(5-6):425-917178575
PubMed ID
27766522 View in PubMed
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Improving safety in the Alaskan commercial fishing industry

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5923
Source
Pages 705-713 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
  1 document  
Author
Lincoln, J
Husberg, B
Conway, G
Author Affiliation
Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. jlincoln@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 705-713 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Drowning - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Fisheries - standards
Humans
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Population Surveillance
Ships - standards
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Over 90% of deaths in Alaska's commercial fishing industry were due to drowning, following vessel sinkings. In the early 1990's, the U.S. Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety Act required the implementation of safety measures for all fishing vessels. The purpose of our study was to examine the effectiveness of these measures in reducing the high fatality rate of Alaska's commercial fishermen. STUDY DESIGN: Alaska Occupational Injury Surveillance System and AlaskaTrauma Registry data were used to examine fishing fatalities and injuries. Demographic, risk factor, and incident data were analyzed for trend. RESULTS: During 1991-1998, there was a significant (p
PubMed ID
11768452 View in PubMed
Documents
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Safety-culture in a Norwegian shipping company.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171802
Source
J Safety Res. 2005;36(5):441-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jon Ivar Håvold
Author Affiliation
Alesund University College, N-6025 Alesund, Norway. jh@hials.no
Source
J Safety Res. 2005;36(5):441-58
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Commerce
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Oceans and Seas
Organizational Culture
Questionnaires
Risk Management
Safety
Self-Evaluation Programs
Ships - standards
Abstract
Although there has been considerable interest in safety culture and safety climate in many industries, little attention has been given to safety culture in one of the world's riskiest industries, shipping.
Using both self developed items and items from published research on safety culture, safety climate, and quality and management style, a 40-item safety culture questionnaire was developed. The questionnaire was distributed in a self-administered form to sailors onboard 20 vessels and to officers attending a seminar in Manila. A total of 349 questionnaires were collected (total response rate, 60%).
Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed 11 factors when the Kaiser eigenvalue rule was used and four factors when the scree test criterion was used. The factor structure in the material confirmed structures found in other industries. The relative importance of the factors from the factor analysis on "level of safety" measures was tested by canonical correlation analysis and regression analysis. The results confirmed previous research and showed that the most important factors were influential across industries. To determine weather differences existed between nationalities, occupations, and vessels the factors from the PCA was subjected to Multiple Discriminant Analysis. Significant differences between occupations, nations, and vessels were found on one or more of the factors from the PCA.
PubMed ID
16310804 View in PubMed
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The successful evolution of a voluntary vessel safety program in the USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165047
Source
Int Marit Health. 2006;57(1-4):85-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Leslie Hughes
Author Affiliation
North Pacific Fishing Vessel Owners' Association Vessel Safety Program, 1900 West Emerson Place, Suite 101, Seattle, WA 98119, USA. leslie@npfvoa.org
Source
Int Marit Health. 2006;57(1-4):85-93
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Fisheries - standards
Humans
Naval Medicine
Occupational Health
Safety
Ships - standards
United States
Voluntary Programs - organization & administration
Abstract
The North Pacific Fishing Vessel Owners' Association (NPFVOA) is a non-profit association dedicated to safety education and training for commercial fishermen and other mariners. Funding is provided primarily through member contributions and also through tuition fees and sales of materials. Members are primarily fishing vessel owners and fishing-related companies, from small salmon boats with single operators to large processing ships with crews of 150 or more. The Association also works together with insurance underwriters and brokers, maritime attorneys and fishing industry support businesses. It works closely with the United States Coast Guard, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the United States Department of Labor, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and many state agencies. There are three primary components of the NPFVOA Vessel Safety Program--a comprehensive safety manual, a series of safety and survival at sea videotapes, and a crew training program. The vessel safety manual includes 300 pages of text and illustrations covering subjects ranging from vessel familiarity for deckhands to stability for the owner and skipper. It is based on the experience of those who have fished the Bering Sea and the North Pacific. The manual calls for vessel owners and skippers to adopt safety practices specific to the vessel's characteristics and service, the waters fished, the season fished and the experience of the crew. The safety and survival videotape series is designed to complement hands-on training classes. The crew training program uses hands-on practice to dramatize and enliven the information presented in the manual and on the videotapes. Courses are designed to be portable and conducted in numerous ports and states. The NPFVOA also publishes a quarterly newsletter covering its safety program, other relevant safety information and reports of lessons learned from serious fishing vessel accidents.
PubMed ID
17312697 View in PubMed
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Toxicity of treated bilge water: The need for revised regulatory control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282069
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Jan 30;114(2):860-866
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2017
Author
Peter Tiselius
Kerstin Magnusson
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Jan 30;114(2):860-866
Date
Jan-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources - legislation & jurisprudence
Copepoda - drug effects
Oceans and Seas
Ships - standards
Surface-Active Agents - toxicity
Sweden
Toxicity Tests
Waste Water - chemistry - toxicity
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Purification - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - standards
Abstract
Water accumulating in the bottom of ships (bilge water), contains a mixture of oil, detergents and other compounds from on board activities. To evaluate ecological effects of released bilge water the chemical composition and toxicity of treated bilge water from seven passenger ships was analysed. The oil content was below 15mgL(-1), the threshold for legal discharge, in all but one ship. Still, significant reductions in feeding and reproduction of Acartia tonsa were found after 48h exposure in dilutions with 2.5-5% of bilge water. Mortality was significant at dilutions of 5-10% in 4 of the 5 bilge water samples. Surfactants were the most significant contributor to the toxicity on copepod vital rates and survival. Toxicity was also tested with Microtox where an EC50 was found at dilutions between 4.3% and 52%. The results show that ecological effects might occur also in diluted suspensions of bilge water.
PubMed ID
27855954 View in PubMed
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[Traumatism among the personnel of fishing boats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6309
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(7):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
K A Shapovalov
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(7):27-30
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Arctic Regions
English Abstract
Humans
Naval Medicine - standards - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Ships - standards
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyze accident rates on board the ships of the North Basin Fish Fleet along with the data on surgical interventions during a 10-year period. High accident rates among the members of the deck crew were caused by intensive working conditions characterized by cargo moving, monitoring operations, insufficient lighting of the deck and different mechanisms. Such kinds of work as maintenance and repair of the mechanisms in the machine room, trawling, fishing and fish processing were regarded as highly traumatic. Hand trauma is an occupational injury in sailors because of the great amount of manual labor on board the ships. It was pointed out that control of nonoccupational accidents and alcohol abuse among sailors was also of great importance.
PubMed ID
2529647 View in PubMed
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Where else? Assessing zones of alternate ballast water exchange in the Canadian eastern Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298860
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Feb; 139:74-90
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Jesica Goldsmit
Shannon Hope Nudds
D Bruce Stewart
Jeff Wayde Higdon
Charles Gordon Hannah
Kimberly Lynn Howland
Author Affiliation
Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Maurice Lamontagne Institute, 850 Route de la Mer, Sainte-Flavie, QC G0J 2L0, Canada. Electronic address: jesica.goldsmit@dfo-mpo.gc.ca.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Feb; 139:74-90
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Introduced species
Models, Theoretical
Ships - standards
Transportation
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Mid-ocean ballast water exchange (BWE) is recommended for international vessels to minimize the transfer of nonindigenous species (NIS). When this cannot be accomplished due to safety concerns, alternate ballast water exchange zones (ABWEZ) may be used. A coupled-ice-ocean model with meteorological forcing and particle tracking was used to evaluate the relative risks from BWE along primary shipping routes into Canada's eastern Arctic. Relative risk to receiving habitats from BWE was calculated from the product of likelihood of exposure, likelihood of establishment, and habitat sensitivity to potential NIS. Modelling results indicate that existing ABWEZs in and around Lancaster Sound and Hudson Strait are among the areas of highest relative risk for introductions of NIS via ballast water. The deeper offshore regions of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay should be considered as alternatives. However, further research is recommended to assess the risks of NIS associated with BWE in the Canadian Arctic.
PubMed ID
30686452 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.