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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Diesel exhaust exposure and smoking: a case-referent study of lung cancer among Swedish dock workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24063
Source
Epidemiology. 1993 May;4(3):237-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A. Emmelin
L. Nyström
S. Wall
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Environmental Studies, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 1993 May;4(3):237-44
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Petroleum
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Ships
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
We studied 50 lung cancer cases and 154 matched referents, all dock workers, for whom we obtained smoking information and employment histories. We assessed exposures from information on annual diesel fuel consumption from each of the 15 ports included. We used a smoker/nonsmoker term and three exposure variables (machine time, cumulative fuel, and exposed time with fuel consumption above a minimum cutpoint) in the analyses, with three categories for each exposure variable. Odds ratios (ORs) for medium and high exposure groups are consistently higher than reference (low), with an increasing exposure-response trend that is most marked for the exposed time variable (ORs: low = 1.0; medium = 1.6; high = 2.8). When smoking and that exposure variable are simultaneously included in the analyses, odds ratios for the medium (OR = 2.7) and high (OR = 6.8) levels of exposure increase, as does the odds ratio for smoking. Separating smokers and nonsmokers, with the low exposed nonsmokers as the common reference category, the odds ratios are 1.6 (medium) and 2.9 (high) for the nonsmokers, and 10.7 (medium) and 28.9 (high) for smokers. These results indicate an independent effect of diesel exhaust exposure and a strong interaction between smoking and diesel exhaust.
PubMed ID
7685637 View in PubMed
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Infections onboard ship--analysis of 1290 advice calls to the Radio Medical (RM) doctor in Sweden. Results from 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127842
Source
Int Marit Health. 2011;62(3):191-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karin Westlund
Author Affiliation
Radio Medical Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. radiomedical@medic.qu.ukl
Source
Int Marit Health. 2011;62(3):191-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Female
Humans
Infection - epidemiology
Male
Naval Medicine - methods - organization & administration
Oceans and Seas
Online Systems
Physicians - organization & administration
Radio
Ships
Sweden - epidemiology
Telemedicine - methods - organization & administration
World Health
Abstract
Results from a descriptive study on Swedish Telemedical Advice Services (TMAS) from 1997, 2002, 2007, and the first six months of 2009 on infectious conditions are presented. These findings concern symptoms, actions taken, number of evacuations, means of communication, and use of digital photos. They show that infectious conditions are a significant contributor to calls to the service and that they can be more frequently treated on board than can other conditions.
PubMed ID
22258846 View in PubMed
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Occupational injuries among fishermen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213108
Source
Bull Inst Marit Trop Med Gdynia. 1996;47(1-4):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
O C Jensen
S. Christensen
S. Larsen
L. Soerensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Maritime Medicine, University Centre of South Jutland, Esbjerg.
Source
Bull Inst Marit Trop Med Gdynia. 1996;47(1-4):11-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents, Occupational - classification - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Naval Medicine
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - classification - epidemiology - prevention & control
Poland - epidemiology
Ships
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - classification - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A sample of 187 medically treated injuries among fishermen was the basis for this study. Nearly half the injuries occurred while shooting or hauling fishing gear. The most common injuries were in the upper extremities (48.7%). Twenty-two percent of the injuries occurred while working with winches ropes and wires and about 30% were caused by falls or slips. Seventy-five percent of accidents occurred on trawlers, where the trawl doors (other boards) are a special hazard. Medical treatment ashore was delayed for more than 24 hours in 35% of the injuries, showing the need for providing optimal treatment facilities on board. Prevention measures should include technical improvements, safety training courses and efforts to enhance the motivation for safe work. The fishermen's proposals for prevention seem to be most useful and should be used to the full extent.
PubMed ID
9101047 View in PubMed
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Pleural plaques and exposure to asbestos: a mathematical model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222624
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Dec;21(6):1180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgren's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Dec;21(6):1180-4
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Pleura - pathology
Risk factors
Ships
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to find a model to describe the relationship between the occurrence of pleural plaques and exposure to asbestos. A simple model based on the cumulative exposure was postulated and empirically tested on shipyard workers occupationally exposed to asbestos. Exposure time was used to approximate the cumulative dose. It was found that the incidence of pleural plaques could be described as K(t-w)a where 't' is time since onset of exposure; 'K' is a constant that would depend on the level of asbestos exposure; 'w' is a latency period and was around 13 years; 'a' is a constant that was 0.4. In subgroups of the workers, i.e. plumbers, fitters and platers, 'a' was 0.4, 0.6 and 0.2 respectively.
PubMed ID
1483825 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of shoulder pain in Swedish flatwater kayakers and its relation to range of motion and scapula stability of the shoulder joint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278573
Source
J Sports Sci. 2016;34(10):951-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Anette Johansson
Ulla Svantesson
Jörgen Tannerstedt
Marie Alricsson
Source
J Sports Sci. 2016;34(10):951-8
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Movement
Range of Motion, Articular
Rotation
Scapula
Ships
Shoulder - pathology
Shoulder Joint
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology
Sports
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Water
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have investigated the incidence of injuries in kayakers. The aim was to study the prevalence of shoulder pain in competitive flatwater kayakers and to evaluate any differences in range of motion or scapula stability of the shoulder joint among kayakers with or without the history of shoulder pain. Thirty-one kayakers were participated in the study, and a questionnaire including background data was used. Shoulder range of motion was measured with a goniometer, and the participants were observed for scapula dyskinesis in flexion and abduction. Of the participating kayakers, 54.8% (n = 17) had experienced shoulder pain. Kayakers who had experienced shoulder pain showed a significantly lower degree of internal rotational range of motion versus kayakers with no reported shoulder pain, with a mean degree of internal rotation in the right shoulder 49.3 vs. 60.0 (P = 0.017) and the left shoulder 51.9 vs. 66.0 (P = 0.000). Kayakers who had experienced shoulder pain were also observed with a scapular dyskinesis (n = 15 of 17 kayakers) to a significantly higher degree (P = 0.001) than kayakers with no reported shoulder pain. Findings suggest that screening for scapular dyskinesis and testing for rotational range of motion in the shoulder joint is essential in order to treat and maybe prevent shoulder pain in kayakers.
PubMed ID
26301322 View in PubMed
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Radiomedical services for seafarers in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68877
Source
Int Marit Health. 2002;53(1-4):59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Karin Westlund
Hakan Svard
Author Affiliation
Radio Medical Department, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg. radiomedical@medic.gu.se
Source
Int Marit Health. 2002;53(1-4):59-66
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Naval Medicine - methods
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Radio
Remote Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Ships - manpower
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
12608589 View in PubMed
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The risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma after cessation of asbestos exposure: a prospective cohort study of shipyard workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24501
Source
Eur Respir J. 1992 Mar;5(3):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
A. Sandén
B. Järvholm
S. Larsson
G. Thiringer
Author Affiliation
Dept of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgren Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1992 Mar;5(3):281-5
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Naval Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Ships
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
A prospective cohort study of 3,893 shipyard workers, mainly exposed to chrysotile, indicated no increased risk of lung cancer 7-15 yrs after exposure to asbestos had ceased. The shipyard workers, however, had an increased risk of pleural mesotheliomas with 11 observed cases versus 1.5 expected. An explanation for these observations may be that asbestos may have different carcinogenic mechanisms in causing lung cancer and mesothelioma. A non-increased risk of lung cancer some years after exposure to asbestos has stopped is in accordance with asbestos acting as a promotor. The high risk of mesothelioma, on the other hand, may indicate that asbestos acts as a complete carcinogen in developing this disease.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 1992 Oct;5(9):1161-21426229
PubMed ID
1572439 View in PubMed
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A study of possible predictors of mesothelioma in shipyard workers exposed to asbestos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24805
Source
J Occup Med. 1991 Jul;33(7):770-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
A. Sandén
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgren Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Occup Med. 1991 Jul;33(7):770-3
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mesothelioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Ships
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Abstract
In a prospective cohort study of 3893 shipyard workers, we estimated the value of medical monitoring, including chest radiograph, spirometry, and questions about smoking habits, asbestos exposure, and respiratory symptoms, as predictors of the risk of developing mesothelioma. There was no strong association between different exposure parameters and risk of mesothelioma. Impaired lung function and smoking were not predictors of risk of mesothelioma. Pleural plaque was not found to be associated with an increased risk of mesothelioma. Respiratory symptoms were of low value as predictors of risk of mesothelioma. Thus, traditional methods in health monitoring seem to be of low value in identifying persons with a high risk of mesothelioma in populations exposed to asbestos.
PubMed ID
1890486 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.