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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Accidental exposure to electromagnetic fields from the radar of a naval ship: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256376
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente E Moen
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Nils Bull
Gunnhild Oftedal
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. bente.moen@isf.uib.no.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adult
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radar
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
Part of a crew on a Norwegian naval ship was exposed to the radar waves for approximately 7 min from an American destroyer during an incident at sea in August 2012. Information about the exposure was not given by the navy. This is a description of what happened with the crew on board after this event. 14 persons had been on the ship bridge or outside on the deck during the exposure and the rest of the crew had been inside the ship. 27 persons were examined at a hospital 6-8 months after the event, as they had developeda large number of symptoms from different organ systems. They were very worried about all types of possible adverse health effects due to the incident. All were examined by an occupational physician and anophthalmologist, by an interview, clinical examinations and blood tests at the hospital. The interview of the personnel revealed that they had not experienced any major heating during the episode. Their symptoms developed days or weeks after the radar exposure. They had no objective signs of adverse health effects at the examination related to the incident. Long-term health effect from the exposure is highly unlikely. The development of different symptoms after the incident was probably due to the fear of possible health consequences. Better routines for such incidents at sea should be developed to avoid this type of anxiety.
PubMed ID
24408137 View in PubMed
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The aftermath of an industrial disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209965
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1997;392:1-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A. Elklit
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1997;392:1-25
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia - psychology
Blast Injuries - psychology
Burns - psychology
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Explosions
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Relief Work
Ships
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
An explosion in a Danish supertanker under construction in 1994 caused the death of six workers and injured 15. Six months later 270 workers took part in this study, which analyses the relationships between objective stressors, the workers' own feelings and the reactions of their families after the explosion together with training, attitude to the workplace, general out-look, and received crisis help. Traumatisation, coping style and crisis support was assessed via the Impact of Event Scale (IES), the Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ) and the Crisis Support Scale (CSS). Emotionally, workers and their families were strongly affected by the explosion. The IES-score was 17.6 and the invasion score 9.1. The degree of traumatisation was higher in the group who had an 'audience position' than in the group who was directly hit by the explosion. Training in rescue work did not protect against adverse effects. Rescue work had a strong impact on the involved. Social support was a significant factor, that seems to buffer negative effects. High level of social integration, effective leadership in the situation, and professional crisis intervention characterised the disaster situation. All the same, 41 per cent of the workers reached the caseness criteria by Horowitz (IES > or = 19).
PubMed ID
9284976 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption among laid-off workers before and after closure of a Danish ship-yard: a 2-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12684
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(1):107-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
L. Iversen
H. Klausen
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(1):107-9
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - etiology
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Ships
Unemployment
Abstract
The daily consumption of alcohol in a study of a population of Danish ship-yard workers laid off in relation to unexpected closure, was measured in 1976 (7 months before being laid off) and in 1978 (1 1/2 year after being laid off). The study population (N = 88) consisted mostly of skilled male workers. Data in 1976 and 1978 were collected in exactly the same manner. The main findings were that the unemployed workers were more likely to reduce their alcohol consumption than the reemployed workers in the same population-controlling for age. The study brings no evidence which could support the popular belief of a causal relation between unemployed and use of alcohol.
PubMed ID
3952525 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the respiratory health status among seafarers in the Russian trawler and merchant fleets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133568
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Dec;54(12):971-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Olga Shiryaeva
Lisbeth Aasmoe
Bjørn Straume
Berit Elisabeth Bang
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe, Norway; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsoe, Norway. Olga.Shiryaeva@uit.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Dec;54(12):971-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Russia - epidemiology
Ships
Abstract
Trawler fishermen and merchant seafarers have tough working conditions. While workers in both occupations are exposed to a challenging environment, trawler fishermen are also engaged in onboard fish processing, which is considered to be additional exposure. The aim of the present study was to characterize respiratory health status in both groups of seamen.
In total 127 trawler fishermen and 118 merchant seafarers were enrolled during their regular medical health examinations. The study protocol comprised a standardized questionnaire, lung function test and measurements of fractional nitric oxide concentrations (FE(NO) ) in exhaled air.
Doctor-diagnosed asthma was reported only by trawler fishermen (3.9%, P?
PubMed ID
21692095 View in PubMed
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[Awareness and behavior in relation to occupational evironment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248601
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1978 May 8;140(19):1123-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1978
Author
H. Klausen
L. Iversen
A. Grunnet
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1978 May 8;140(19):1123-32
Date
May-8-1978
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awareness
Behavior
Cognition
Denmark
Environment
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Medicine
Ships
PubMed ID
653866 View in PubMed
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Behavior of aluminum in aluminum welders and manufacturers of aluminum sulfate--impact on biological monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153218
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):451-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Vesa Riihimäki
Sinikka Valkonen
Bernt Engström
Antti Tossavainen
Pertti Mutanen
Antero Aitio
Author Affiliation
Good Practices and Competence, Statistical Services, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. vesa.riihimaki@ttl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):451-62
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - blood - urine
Alum Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Aluminum - analysis - blood - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ships
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Welding
X-Ray Diffraction
Abstract
The suitability of determining aluminum in serum or urine as a form of biological monitoring was critically assessed.
Airborne and internal aluminum exposure was assessed for 12 aluminum welders in a shipyard and 5 manufacturers of aluminum sulfate. Particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Aluminum in air and biological samples was analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Basic toxicokinetic features were inferred from the data.
The mean 8-hour time-weighted average concentration of aluminum was 1.1 (range 0.008-6.1) mg/m(3) for the shipyard and 0.13 (range 0.02-0.5) mg/m(3) for the aluminum sulfate plant. Welding fume contained aluminum oxide particles
PubMed ID
19137207 View in PubMed
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[Biological age and physical work capacity in the prenosological diagnosis of the workers and employees in a ship-building enterprise]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50282
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 1991 May-Jun;17(3):150-7
Publication Type
Article

Blood alcohol concentrations in apprehended drivers of cars and boats suspected to be impaired by the police.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87049
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2008 Mar;9(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Khiabani Hassan Z
Opdal Mimi Stokke
Mørland Jørg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Forensic Toxicology and Drug Abuse, Oslo, Norway. hassan.khiabani@fhi.no
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2008 Mar;9(1):31-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Breath Tests
Confidence Intervals
Ethanol - blood
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway
Police - standards
Probability
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Ships
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: According to the Norwegian Road Traffic Act, car drivers are not allowed to operate a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) above 0.2 g/kg. Depending on the size of the boat or ship, boat drivers/captains/first mates are not allowed to conduct the boat with a BAC above 0.8 g/kg when driving small boats (length less than 15 m) and above 1.5 g/kg when running larger vessels/ships. The new Sea Act of June 2005 states that captains/first mates cannot conduct a ship if he/she has a BAC above 0.2 g/kg. Our aim was to determine the current median BAC in a large population of car and boat drivers in Norway. Our other aim was to study if median BAC was higher in boat drivers than in car drivers who were suspected by the police to be impaired. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate if the BAC levels were differently distributed by gender or age within and between these two groups. METHODS: The Norwegian Institute of Public Health analyzes blood samples from all car/boat drivers suspected of driving under the influence of alcohol and non-alcoholic drugs. In the present study, samples submitted between 01.05 and 01.09 in 2002-2004 were included. Drivers, who in addition tested positive for drugs or abuse substances other than ethanol were excluded. RESULTS: There were 321 boat drivers and 3,061 car drivers who were suspected to be under the influence of ethanol only. The median BAC in boat drivers (1.76 g/kg [range 0.02-3.54]) was significantly higher compared to that in car drivers (1.54 g/kg [range 0.00-4.27]). In the car driver group, the mean BAC did not differ significantly between men and women. The median level of BAC was significantly higher in men than in women in the boat driver group (1.77 g/kg with CI 1.69-1.85 vs. 1.27 g/kg with CI 0.78-1.76). CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol impairment of car drivers is known to be considered the most important contributing cause of car crash injuries. Driving a boat may demand the same degree of performance skills as driving a car. The median BAC in apprehended boat drivers was considerably high in the present study. The median BAC was also high in car drivers despite strict legislation. The population of drivers of cars in our study, however, is from previous studies known to contain a large proportion of heavy drinkers. Less is known about the drinking habits in boat drivers, and caution is needed in generalizing from our results. However, our results indicate the possible need for stricter legislation and more frequent police control that will hopefully prevent serious accidents caused by ethanol drinking at sea.
PubMed ID
18338292 View in PubMed
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[Cancer among captains and mates on Norwegian tankers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24840
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 May 10;111(12):1469-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1991
Author
B E Moen
T. Riise
A. Helseth
Author Affiliation
Institutt for arbeidsmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen, Haukeland sykehus.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 May 10;111(12):1469-72
Date
May-10-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naval Medicine
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ships
Abstract
1,687 registered captains and mates from a Norwegian census in 1970 were monitored up to 1987. By matching the data from the census with data from the Norwegian Cancer Registry we discovered 104 cases of cancer. A control group of 376 was chosen among those without cancer. A nested case-control study design was used. The material was analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Increased risk of developing cancer was found in the group of seamen who had been working on tankers, especially among seamen who had been working as mate on these tankers. Exposure to chemicals is the major factor distinguishing tankers from other ships. Mates are exposed to chemicals while captains are not. The study indicates the presence of carcinogenic agents on these tankers.
PubMed ID
2042176 View in PubMed
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108 records – page 1 of 11.