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An online platform for rapid oil outflow assessment from grounded tankers for pollution response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296513
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:963-976
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Kristjan Tabri
Martin Heinvee
Janek Laanearu
Monika Kollo
Floris Goerlandt
Author Affiliation
Tallinn University of Technology, School of Engineering, Tallinn, Estonia. Electronic address: kristjan.tabri@ttu.ee.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:963-976
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidents
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Petroleum Pollution
Ships
Software
Abstract
The risk of oil spills is an ongoing societal concern. Whereas several decision support systems exist for predicting the fate and drift of spilled oil, there is a lack of accurate models for assessing the amount of oil spilled and its temporal evolution. In order to close this gap, this paper presents an online platform for the fast assessment of tanker grounding accidents in terms of structural damage and time-dependent amount of spilled cargo oil. The simulation platform consists of the definition of accidental scenarios; the assessment of the grounding damage and the prediction of the time-dependent oil spill size. The performance of this integrated online simulation environment is exemplified through illustrative case studies representing two plausible accidental grounding scenarios in the Gulf of Finland: one resulting in oil spill of about 50?t, while in the other the inner hull remained intact and no spill occurred.
PubMed ID
30301122 View in PubMed
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[A private hospital listened to the relatives and survivors from the ship Estonia. The Ersta hospital voluntarily took over from the crisis intervention groups].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203570
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Dec 2;95(49):5609-11, 5614-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-1998
Author
S. Nordfeldt
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Dec 2;95(49):5609-11, 5614-6
Date
Dec-2-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Crisis Intervention
Disasters
Family - psychology
Finland
Forensic Medicine
Hospitals, Private
Humans
Ships
Survivors
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 3;96(5):44710064924
PubMed ID
9863298 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian network for assessing the collision induced risk of an oil accident in the Gulf of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268276
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5301-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-2015
Author
Annukka Lehikoinen
Maria Hänninen
Jenni Storgård
Emilia Luoma
Samu Mäntyniemi
Sakari Kuikka
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5301-9
Date
May-5-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Bayes Theorem
Estonia
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Russia
Ships
Abstract
The growth of maritime oil transportation in the Gulf of Finland (GoF), North-Eastern Baltic Sea, increases environmental risks by increasing the probability of oil accidents. By integrating the work of a multidisciplinary research team and information from several sources, we have developed a probabilistic risk assessment application that considers the likely future development of maritime traffic and oil transportation in the area and the resulting risk of environmental pollution. This metamodel is used to compare the effects of two preventative management actions on the tanker collision probabilities and the consequent risk. The resulting risk is evaluated from four different perspectives. Bayesian networks enable large amounts of information about causalities to be integrated and utilized in probabilistic inference. Compared with the baseline period of 2007-2008, the worst-case scenario is that the risk level increases 4-fold by the year 2015. The management measures are evaluated and found to decrease the risk by 4-13%, but the utility gained by their joint implementation would be less than the sum of their independent effects. In addition to the results concerning the varying risk levels, the application provides interesting information about the relationships between the different elements of the system.
PubMed ID
25780862 View in PubMed
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Behavior of aluminum in aluminum welders and manufacturers of aluminum sulfate--impact on biological monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153218
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):451-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Vesa Riihimäki
Sinikka Valkonen
Bernt Engström
Antti Tossavainen
Pertti Mutanen
Antero Aitio
Author Affiliation
Good Practices and Competence, Statistical Services, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. vesa.riihimaki@ttl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):451-62
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - blood - urine
Alum Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Aluminum - analysis - blood - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ships
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Welding
X-Ray Diffraction
Abstract
The suitability of determining aluminum in serum or urine as a form of biological monitoring was critically assessed.
Airborne and internal aluminum exposure was assessed for 12 aluminum welders in a shipyard and 5 manufacturers of aluminum sulfate. Particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Aluminum in air and biological samples was analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Basic toxicokinetic features were inferred from the data.
The mean 8-hour time-weighted average concentration of aluminum was 1.1 (range 0.008-6.1) mg/m(3) for the shipyard and 0.13 (range 0.02-0.5) mg/m(3) for the aluminum sulfate plant. Welding fume contained aluminum oxide particles
PubMed ID
19137207 View in PubMed
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Critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) in a shipping company.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197393
Source
Int Marit Health. 1999;50(1-4):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
H. Saarni
S. Saari
U. Häkkinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Center of Maritime Medicine, Turku. Heikki.saarni@occuphealth.fi
Source
Int Marit Health. 1999;50(1-4):49-56
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crisis Intervention
Disasters
Finland
Humans
Naval Medicine - methods - organization & administration
Occupational Diseases - therapy
Occupational Medicine - methods - organization & administration
Ships
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - therapy
Abstract
Critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) is a method used successfully to reduce suffering from stress-related ailments such as insomnia, depression, anger, headaches etc. The resources of the shipping company are very limited and, thus, networking with existing organizations and specialists is necessary to carry out CISD effectively. The present company model has been adopted to take into account various situations and levels of disaster. The model has been adopted at three levels of events:Level 1. Serious accidents on shore, sudden deaths, severe events and threats. Events involving one or only few persons. Level 2. Life-threatening occupational accidents on board ship, suicide of a workmate, sudden death and fire on board ship. Events involving one person or limited group of persons. Level 3. Disasters at sea. Severe events involving all or nearly all persons on board ship. Actions at different levels: Level 1: A leaflet describing CISD, situations where it would be appropriate and where it is available, is given to each sailor. The victim is encouraged to seek CISD from public health care centres, most of which have their own services in Finland. Level 2. Training of about 8 hours is carried out by an experienced crisis psychologist for supervisors and officers on board ship. After the training they are able to identify stressful situations. At each harbour, the shipping company has made agreements with experienced crisis psychologists to act as specialists and contact persons on shore. These nominated psychologists will initiate CISD actions when necessary. If they need extra manpower they will turn to other psychologists. Level 3. In such serious accidents, the company's own resources alone are insufficient to provide effective CISD. All available public and private resources will he needed (health care organizations, Red Cross, Church etc.).
PubMed ID
10970271 View in PubMed
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Effects of impulse noise and continuous steady state noise on hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240880
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1984 Feb;41(1):122-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984
Author
S. Mäntysalo
J. Vuori
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1984 Feb;41(1):122-32
Date
Feb-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Auditory Threshold
Electrolysis
Finland
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - etiology
Humans
Male
Noise - adverse effects
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Reference Values
Ships
Time Factors
Welding
Abstract
In this study the effects on hearing induced by occupational exposure to impulse noise were compared with those induced by exposure to continuous steady state noise. Three groups exposed to impulse noise, one group exposed to continuous steady state noise, and an unexposed control group were studied. The hearing thresholds of the groups were measured by a puretone audiometer three times in two workdays. None of the groups showed significant differences between the hearing thresholds measured in the morning, at midday, and in the afternoon. Group 1 with the shortest duration of exposure and group 2 with the intermediate duration of exposure to impulse noise had the highest thresholds at 6000 Hz in both ears. Group 3 with the longest duration of exposure to impulse noise had the highest thresholds asymmetrically, at 4000 Hz in the left ear and at 6000 Hz in the right ear. The group exposed to continuous steady state noise also had the highest thresholds asymmetrically, in the left ear at 6000 Hz. It was concluded that the longer the duration of exposure to impulse noise the wider the region of the frequencies that showed raised threshold shifts in both ears. Impulse noise seemed to produce permanent threshold shifts at 4000 and 6000 Hz after a shorter duration of exposure than continuous steady state noise.
Notes
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 1970 Aug;48(2):524-305528412
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1978 Apr;39(4):301-11645558
Cites: Acta Otolaryngol. 1979 Mar-Apr;87(3-4):255-63443006
Cites: Acta Otolaryngol. 1979 Mar-Apr;87(3-4):264-6443007
Cites: Audiology. 1979 May-Jun;18(3):181-96464892
Cites: Audiology. 1979;18(4):320-34475664
Cites: Scand Audiol Suppl. 1980 Aug;(Suppl 12):204-116939090
Cites: Scand Audiol Suppl. 1980 Aug;(Suppl 12):249-566939094
Cites: Scand Audiol Suppl. 1980 Aug;(Suppl 12):339-486939106
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1964 May-Jun;25:237-4514168421
PubMed ID
6691929 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tob Control. 2003 Dec;12(4):344
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
David Simpson
Source
Tob Control. 2003 Dec;12(4):344
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - methods
Finland
Health education
Humans
Ships
Smoking - prevention & control
PubMed ID
14660759 View in PubMed
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Finnish international twin- and friendship-hospital work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224559
Source
Med War. 1992 Jan-Mar;8(1):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Taipale
A R Jyrkinen
Author Affiliation
Kellokoski Psychiatric Hospital, Finland.
Source
Med War. 1992 Jan-Mar;8(1):31-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Community-Institutional Relations - economics
Developing Countries
Finland
Foster Home Care - organization & administration
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Ships
Abstract
This article describes co-operation between three psychiatric hospitals in different parts of the world. Twin- and friendship-hospital work is a way to increase the status of psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric patients in society. Direct contacts between hospital workers of these hospitals is now part of everyday life. It has been an innovative addition to 'normal' psychiatric work.
PubMed ID
9132540 View in PubMed
Less detail

Free-time activities among seafarers on board Finnish cargo ships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213107
Source
Bull Inst Marit Trop Med Gdynia. 1996;47(1-4):33-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
H. Saarni
J. Pentti
Author Affiliation
Turku Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
Source
Bull Inst Marit Trop Med Gdynia. 1996;47(1-4):33-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Ships
Socialization
Abstract
Seafarers' free time activities on board ship and on shore were investigated by means of a questionnaire sent to 507 seafarers working on 35 ships. All the seafarers were Finnish citizens and all the ships in Finnish ownership. The questionnaire was returned by 245 seafarers (22 of them were women) from a total of 34 ships. Reading was the most popular way of spending free time while on board ship. Next came watching television or listening to the radio; then chatting with friends and sleeping/keeping to oneself. About one in four put physical exercise and sauna baths among the three most common ways of spending free time. The most common ways of spending free time on shore were meeting friends and acquaintances and watching TV or listening to the radio. In third place were "other ways of spending leisure time", most of which included being out of door, hunting, going to the summer cottage and gardening. Physical exercise activity was greater on shore than on board ship. The respondents were grouped into four categories: A) reader/student/hobbyist: B) sociable: C) exercise enthusiast D) TV watcher/radio listener Group A considered the ship's atmosphere and the spirit of solidarity on board better than the others. Group B had more often a good friend on board ship and less often suffered from anxiety or depression. Group C more often considered their health and working capacity good. Group D had no positive differences over the other groups. More attention should be paid to developing the ways in which free time is spent not only on board but also during the compensatory free time on shore.
PubMed ID
9101050 View in PubMed
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Health promotion in the Finnish shipping industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191744
Source
Int Marit Health. 2001;52(1-4):44-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H. Saarni
M. Laine
L. Niemi
J. Pentti
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku. heikki.saarni@occuphealth.fi
Source
Int Marit Health. 2001;52(1-4):44-58
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naval Medicine
Occupational Health Services - organization & administration
Physical Examination
Physical Fitness
Questionnaires
Ships
Travel
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In autumn 1997 a pilot project was started in Finland to develop methods for promoting the health of sailors. Four Finnish shipping companies, (4 cargo ships and 2 passenger-cruise ferries), with altogether 730 sailors participated in the project. Special attention was paid to individuals with health problems and those who generally did not take care of their own health or fitness. Three-quarters of the respondents saw their health as good and one fifth as fair. Thirty-four persons responded that their working capacity was poor. 154 sailors were selected into further physical fitness evaluations. The main task of the project team was to activate sailors to take care of their own health and well-being. The health-promoting activities were directed especially at those persons who needed it. Information lectures concerning healthier eating habits and meals were given. Anti-smoking and anti-alcohol drinking information was given. On board one cruise ferry a project was started on how to react as early as possible to alcohol abuse among seafarers. Courses on shore for sailors were arranged to improve their physical fitness and to increase their resting benefit between working periods at sea. The intervention time was one year. Information about smoking and alcohol led to reduced alcohol consumption. The sailors had started to exercise more often both on board ship and on shore. Those who had increased their physical exercise during free time more often found their own health and working ability to have improved than those who had not changed their exercise habits. It appeared that health intervention projects are really needed especially by older sailors. The results also showed that positive effects could be achieved in the fitness of sailors. Better fitness was good for their health and also increased the work safety.
PubMed ID
11817841 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.