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[Accidents with fatal outcome in Finnish leisure boating 1986-1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103579
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Penttilä
J. Pikkarainen
Author Affiliation
Institut für Rechtsmedizin, Universität Helsinki.
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Date
1990
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drowning - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leisure Activities
Risk factors
Ships - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
All 291 fatal accidents (510 persons on board, 318 drowned) in water traffic in Finland in 1986-1988 were investigated by specific teams. Only some data of this extensive investigation are presented in this study. Staggering and falling in boat because of drunkenness, falling over and sinking of boat were the main causes of getting into water of the people aboard. Only 3.5% of the drowned had used life jackets and 9.7% of them could not swim. The reduced ability to swim because of alcohol and the exhaustion were in about half of the drowned the actual cause and the cold water in one third the background factor for drowning. The results indicate that fatal accidents in water traffic are a major problem of males (95.9%) and give important information for countermeasures.
PubMed ID
2241787 View in PubMed
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Community patterns of psychiatric disorders after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3358
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Oct;150(10):1517-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
L A Palinkas
J S Petterson
J. Russell
M A Downs
Author Affiliation
Impact Assessment, Inc., La Jolla, Calif.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Oct;150(10):1517-23
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disasters
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Petroleum
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Ships
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationship between exposure to the Exxon Valdez oil spill and subsequent cleanup efforts and the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depressive symptoms in 13 Alaska communities. METHOD: A community survey of 599 men and women was conducted approximately 1 year after the spill occurred. Questions from the National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule were used to assess symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and PTSD. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale was used to assess levels of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The post-spill (i.e., 1-year) prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder and PTSD for the study communities with all degrees of exposure was 20.2% and 9.4%, respectively. The prevalence of respondents with CES-D Scale scores above 16 and 18 was 16.6% and 14.2%, respectively. When compared with the unexposed group, members of the high-exposure group were 3.6 times as likely to have generalized anxiety disorder, 2.9 times as likely to have PTSD, 1.8 times as likely to have a CES-D Scale score of 16 and above, and 2.1 times as likely to have a CES-D Scale score of 18 and above. Women exposed to this event were particularly vulnerable to these conditions, and Alaska Natives were particularly vulnerable to depressive symptoms after the oil spill. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the oil spill's impact on the psychosocial environment was as significant as its impact on the physical environment. The Exxon Valdez experience suggests a number of implications for the mental health needs of disaster victims, particularly in primary care settings.
PubMed ID
8379557 View in PubMed
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Crab allergen exposures aboard five crab-processing vessels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3818
Source
AIHA J (Fairfax, Va). 2002 Sep-Oct;63(5):605-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy Beaudet
C Andrew Brodkin
Bert Stover
Feroza Daroowalla
Joy Flack
Dan Doherty
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program, Departments of Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Washington, Box 359739, 325 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98104, USA.
Source
AIHA J (Fairfax, Va). 2002 Sep-Oct;63(5):605-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Allergens - adverse effects
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Shellfish - adverse effects
Ships
Abstract
Aerosolized crab allergens are suspected etiologic agents for asthma among crab-processing workers. The objectives of this study were to characterize crab allergen concentrations and respiratory symptom prevalence among processing workers aboard crab-processing vessels. A cross-sectional survey of five crab-processing vessels was conducted near Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Crab allergen concentrations were quantified during specific work activities with 25 personal air samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene filters and analyzed by a competitive IgE immunoassay technique. Two standardized respiratory questionnaires were used to assess respiratory symptoms suggestive of bronchitis or asthma in 82 workers. Aerosolized crab allergen concentrations ranged from 79 ng/m3 to 21,093 ng/m3 (mean = 2797 ng/m3, SD = 4576 ng/m3). The highest concentrations were measured at butchering/degilling work stations, which were combined on the smallest vessel. A significant percentage of workers reported development of respiratory symptoms during the crab-processing season. Cough developed in 28% of workers, phlegm in 11% of workers, and wheeze and other asthma-like symptoms developed in 4% of workers. Despite variations in crab allergen levels, respiratory symptom prevalence was similar across all job categories. Substantial concentrations of crab allergen exposure were measured, as well as the potential for wide variability in exposure during crab processing aboard vessels. The high prevalence of reported respiratory symptoms across all job categories suggests potential adverse respiratory effects that should be further characterized by prospective studies using pulmonary function and serology testing, and rigorous exposure characterization.
PubMed ID
12529915 View in PubMed
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[Health status of redundant ship employees. Results of a cross-sectional study in a 3-year prospective study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75228
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 Nov 4;147(45):3629-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1985

Hearing loss in the royal Norwegian Navy: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270060
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):641-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Kaja Irgens-Hansen
Erlend Sunde
Magne Bråtveit
Valborg Baste
Gunnhild Oftedal
Vilhelm Koefoed
Ola Lind
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):641-9
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Ships
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prior studies have indicated a high prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among Navy personnel; however, it is not clear whether this is caused by work on board. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of hearing loss among Navy personnel in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN), and to investigate whether there is an association between work on board RNoN vessels and occurrence of hearing loss.
Navy personnel currently working on board RNoN vessels were recruited to complete a questionnaire on noise exposure and health followed by pure tone audiometry. Hearing loss was defined as hearing threshold levels =25 dB in either ear at the frequencies 3,000, 4,000 or 6,000 Hz. Hearing thresholds were adjusted for age and gender using ISO 7029.
The prevalence of hearing loss among Navy personnel was 31.4 %. The work exposure variables: years of work in the Navy, years on vessel(s) in the Navy and years of sailing in the Navy were associated with reduced hearing after adjusting for age, gender and otitis as an adult. Among the work exposure variables, years of sailing in the Navy was the strongest predictor of reduced hearing, and significantly reduced hearing was found at the frequencies 1,000, 3,000 and 4,000 Hz.
Our results indicate that time spent on board vessels in the RNoN is a predictor of reduced hearing.
Notes
Cites: Ear Hear. 1995 Aug;16(4):382-918549894
Cites: Noise Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;14(56):21-722387709
Cites: Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 1999 Mar;14(3):186-9110453633
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2005 Dec;48(6):446-5816299704
Cites: Int J Audiol. 2006 May;45(5):309-1716717022
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2006 Aug;49(8):624-3316732555
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 Apr;172(4):426-3017484318
Cites: Noise Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;10(39):41-518580037
Cites: Int Marit Health. 2008;59(1-4):35-4419227736
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 May;36(3):250-720024522
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2001 Jan;58(1):46-5111119634
Cites: Mil Med. 2002 Jan;167(1):48-5211799813
Cites: Mil Med. 2002 Feb;167(2):132-511873535
Cites: Mil Med. 1995 May;160(5):219-227659208
Cites: Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Oct;124(8):946-5215513532
Cites: Scand Audiol. 1989;18(3):161-52814330
Cites: Mil Med. 2004 Jun;169(6):429-3215281670
PubMed ID
25287192 View in PubMed
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High prevalence of asthma in Danish elite canoe- and kayak athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125707
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Apr;59(4):A4405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Charlotte Suppli Ulrik
Claus Svenningsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark.. csulrik@dadlnet.dk
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Apr;59(4):A4405
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diuretics, Osmotic
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mannitol
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Ships
Sports Medicine
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma is common in elite athletes, but our knowledge of asthma in elite canoe and kayak athletes is limited. The aim of the present prospective cross-sectional study was therefore to investigate the prevalence of asthma, including asthma-like symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and airway reactivity to mannitol in Danish elite canoe and kayak athletes
The study group consisted of 29 (of 33 eligible) elite athletes aged 17-43 years, and the examination programme consisted of questionnaires, including the Asthma Control Questionnaire, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), spirometry and airway reactivity to mannitol. Asthma was defined as a history of doctor-diagnosed asthma and/or elevated FENO and airway reactivity.
Seven of the elite athletes (24.1%) were found to have asthma, including four subjects with previously doctor-diagnosed asthma. Of the four athletes (all treated with inhaled corticosteroids) with doctor-diagnosed asthma, all reported asthma-symptoms and two had elevated FENO, but none had airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to mannitol. All three athletes with previously undiagnosed asthma had elevated FENO and AHR to mannitol, but reported no asthma-like symptoms.
Asthma is common in elite canoe and kayak athletes, and classical signs of asthmatic airway inflammation are also found in asymptomatic athletes.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
22459716 View in PubMed
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Non-fatal occupational fall and slip injuries among commercial fishermen analyzed by use of the NOMESCO injury registration system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198698
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2000 Jun;37(6):637-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
O C Jensen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Maritime Medicine, at the University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. ocj@esb.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2000 Jun;37(6):637-44
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Ships - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Fall injuries constitute a significant problem in commercial fishing and such injuries have hitherto not been the subject of closer analysis.
The distribution and the characteristics of 582 occupational injuries among commercial fishermen are described by using data from an emergency department for the period 1990-1997, recorded in a special registration system.
Consistent with other investigations, injuries from falls made up 25% of all injuries; they were the cause of 28% of all contusions, 32% of all fractures, 61% of all sprains and strains, 40% of all injuries to lower extremities, and 62% of all injuries to the chest. The proportion of fall injuries in different age groups was U-shaped and constitutes around 40% for men both under 20 years and over 50 years of age, and around 20% for those between these ages. Frequent types of injury mechanisms other than falls and slips were: getting caught (22%), contact with objects or persons (28%), foreign body (9%), and cuts (9%).
Use of proportionate data gave a detailed description of injuries from falls and slips, showing important areas for prevention. To avoid a possible misclassification of fall injuries in future studies, it is recommended to include an extra specific variable: whether falling or slipping preceded the crash phase of the injury or not.
PubMed ID
10797507 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of Fumigants and Hazardous Off-gassing Chemicals in Shipping Containers Arriving in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287504
Source
Ann Work Expo Health. 2017 03 01;61(2):195-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-01-2017
Author
Urban Svedberg
Gunnar Johanson
Source
Ann Work Expo Health. 2017 03 01;61(2):195-206
Date
03-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fumigation - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ships - methods
Sweden
Threshold Limit Values
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
Containerized cargo shipment makes up the backbone of international trade. The principal aim of this cross-sectional study was to establish a qualitative and quantitative description of gaseous fumigants and volatile off-gassing substances facing workers tasked with entering shipping containers. A total of 372 packed and 119 empty shipping containers were sampled in six ports and two distribution centers in Sweden. Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and photoionization detection (PID) were the analytical methods applied to the bulk of samples. A small number of adsorbent samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results were compared to Swedish occupational exposure limits (OELs), the closest parallel to relevant work situations. Based on the FTIR analyses, 30 of 249 (12%) containers arrived with concentrations of fumigants and off-gassing substances above the 8-h OELs and close to 7% were above the short-term exposure limits. Eight detected chemicals were classified as carcinogens and 4% of the containers arrived with levels of carcinogens above the OELs, at a maximum 30 times the 8-h OEL. Considerable differences were observed between ports, ranging from 0 to 33% of containers arriving with concentrations above the OELs. It is believed that all observation results, apart from a single instance of a confirmed fumigant, phosphine, at 3 p.p.m., and possibly three instances of carbon dioxide, can be attributed to off-gassing substances. The FTIR methodology proved useful for quick preliminary checks and in-depth screening and identification. The PID method produced both false-negative and false-positive results where only 48% matched the FTIR observations. Adsorbent sampling with GC-MS analysis was useful for confirming volatile organic compounds but was deemed too slow for day-to-day screening. The high frequency of contaminated containers, the detection of several carcinogens, and the sporadic occurrences of high levels of fumigants are serious concerns that need to be properly recognized in order to protect the workers at risk.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Entomol. 2002;47:331-5911729078
Cites: Talanta. 1988 Oct;35(10):775-8218964613
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2010 Mar;67(3):207-1219858536
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2013 Nov;57(9):1128-3723825354
PubMed ID
28395344 View in PubMed
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Pleural plaques and exposure to asbestos: a mathematical model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222624
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Dec;21(6):1180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgren's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Dec;21(6):1180-4
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Pleura - pathology
Risk factors
Ships
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to find a model to describe the relationship between the occurrence of pleural plaques and exposure to asbestos. A simple model based on the cumulative exposure was postulated and empirically tested on shipyard workers occupationally exposed to asbestos. Exposure time was used to approximate the cumulative dose. It was found that the incidence of pleural plaques could be described as K(t-w)a where 't' is time since onset of exposure; 'K' is a constant that would depend on the level of asbestos exposure; 'w' is a latency period and was around 13 years; 'a' is a constant that was 0.4. In subgroups of the workers, i.e. plumbers, fitters and platers, 'a' was 0.4, 0.6 and 0.2 respectively.
PubMed ID
1483825 View in PubMed
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Radiographic abnormalities among Finnish construction, shipyard and asbestos industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205371
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Apr;24(2):109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
K. Koskinen
A. Zitting
A. Tossavainen
J P Rinne
P. Roto
J. Kivekäs
K. Reijula
M S Huuskonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki. Kari.Koskinen@occuphealth.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Apr;24(2):109-17
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - radiography
Cohort Studies
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Pleura - radiography
Risk
Ships
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The prevalence of asbestos-related radiographic abnormalities was surveyed among Finnish construction, shipyard, and asbestos industry workers.
The radiographic screening focused on active and retired workers who were under the age of 70 years and had been employed for at least 10 years in construction or for at least 1 year in shipyards or in the asbestos industry. In 1990-1992, 18,943 people participated in an X-ray examination of the lungs and an interview on work history and exposure. The criteria for a positive radiological finding were (i) small irregular lung opacities clearly consistent with interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (ILO 1/1 or higher), (ii) lung opacities indicating mild pulmonary fibrosis (ILO 1/0) with unilateral or bilateral pleural plaques, (iii) marked adhesions with or without thickening of the visceral pleura, or (iv) findings consistent with bilateral pleural plaques.
Fulfilling the criteria were 4133 workers (22%) (22% from construction, 16% from shipyards, and 24% from the asbestos industry). The radiological findings included signs of pulmonary fibrosis (3%), changes in the visceral pleura (7%), bilateral plaques (17%), and unilateral plaques (10%). Occupational disease was diagnosed according to the Finnish insurance regulations for three-fourths of those referred for further examinations, 96% being abnormalities in the pleura and 4% being asbestosis.
Exposure to asbestos dust has been common in ordinary construction work, and, consequently, radiographic abnormalities (mostly pleural) occur frequently among active and retired construction workers.
PubMed ID
9630058 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.