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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Commercial fishing deaths - United States, 2000-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96344
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-2010
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Date
Jul-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality - prevention & control
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Commerce
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Ships
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States. During 1992-2008, an annual average of 58 reported deaths occurred (128 deaths per 100,000 workers), compared with an average of 5,894 deaths (four per 100,000 workers) among all U.S. workers. During the 1990s, safety interventions addressing specific hazards identified in Alaska resulted in a significant decline in the state's commercial fishing fatality rate. During 2007-2010, CDC expanded surveillance of commercial fishing fatalities to the rest of the country's fishing areas. To review the hazards and risk factors for occupational mortality in the U.S. commercial fishing industry, and to explore how hazards and risk factors differ among fisheries and locations, CDC collected and analyzed data on each fatality reported during 2000-2009. This report summarizes the results, which showed that, among the 504 U.S. commercial fishing deaths, the majority occurred after a vessel disaster (261 deaths, 52%) or a fall overboard (155 deaths, 31%). By region, 133 (26%) deaths occurred off the coast of Alaska, 124 (25%) in the Northeast, 116 (23%) in the Gulf of Mexico, 83 (16%) off the West Coast, and 41 (8%) in the Mid- and South Atlantic. Type of fishing was known in 478 deaths; shellfish (226, 47%) was the most common, followed by groundfish (144, 30%) and pelagic fish (97, 20%). To reduce fatalities in this industry, additional prevention measures tailored to specific high-risk fisheries and focusing on prevention of vessel disasters and falls overboard are needed.
PubMed ID
20631673 View in PubMed
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Finnish international twin- and friendship-hospital work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224559
Source
Med War. 1992 Jan-Mar;8(1):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Taipale
A R Jyrkinen
Author Affiliation
Kellokoski Psychiatric Hospital, Finland.
Source
Med War. 1992 Jan-Mar;8(1):31-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Community-Institutional Relations - economics
Developing Countries
Finland
Foster Home Care - organization & administration
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Ships
Abstract
This article describes co-operation between three psychiatric hospitals in different parts of the world. Twin- and friendship-hospital work is a way to increase the status of psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric patients in society. Direct contacts between hospital workers of these hospitals is now part of everyday life. It has been an innovative addition to 'normal' psychiatric work.
PubMed ID
9132540 View in PubMed
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The Halifax disaster of 1917 and the birth of North American pediatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195573
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2001 Mar;36(3):405-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
M L Nance
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2001 Mar;36(3):405-8
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Boston
Child
Explosions - history
General Surgery - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
International Cooperation - history
Nova Scotia
Pediatrics - history
Relief Work - history
Ships - history
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr Surg. 2001 Oct;36(10):160611584422
PubMed ID
11226984 View in PubMed
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[Is it expedient to construct a commercial port near Anapa--a health resort for children?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161195
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2007 Jul-Aug;(4):43-6
Publication Type
Article

Laboratory-based respiratory virus surveillance pilot project on select cruise ships in Alaska, 2013-15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289899
Source
J Travel Med. 2017 Sep 01; 24(6):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Kimberly B Rogers
Shahrokh Roohi
Timothy M Uyeki
David Montgomery
Jayme Parker
Nisha H Fowler
Xiyan Xu
Deandra J Ingram
Donna Fearey
Steve M Williams
Grant Tarling
Clive M Brown
Nicole J Cohen
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Source
J Travel Med. 2017 Sep 01; 24(6):
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Nose - virology
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance
Ships
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Influenza outbreaks can occur among passengers and crews during the Alaska summertime cruise season. Ill travellers represent a potential source for introduction of novel or antigenically drifted influenza virus strains to the United States. From May to September 2013-2015, the Alaska Division of Public Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and two cruise lines implemented a laboratory-based public health surveillance project to detect influenza and other respiratory viruses among ill crew members and passengers on select cruise ships in Alaska.
Cruise ship medical staff collected 2-3 nasopharyngeal swab specimens per week from passengers and crew members presenting to the ship infirmary with acute respiratory illness (ARI). Specimens were tested for respiratory viruses at the Alaska State Virology Laboratory (ASVL); a subset of specimens positive for influenza virus were sent to CDC for further antigenic characterization.
Of 410 nasopharyngeal specimens, 83% tested positive for at least one respiratory virus; 71% tested positive for influenza A or B virus. Antigenic characterization of pilot project specimens identified strains matching predominant circulating seasonal influenza virus strains, which were included in the northern or southern hemisphere influenza vaccines during those years. Results were relatively consistent across age groups, recent travel history, and influenza vaccination status. Onset dates of illness relative to date of boarding differed between northbound (occurring later in the voyage) and southbound (occurring within the first days of the voyage) cruises.
The high yield of positive results indicated that influenza was common among passengers and crews sampled with ARI. This finding reinforces the need to bolster influenza prevention and control activities on cruise ships. Laboratory-based influenza surveillance on cruise ships may augment inland influenza surveillance and inform control activities. However, these benefits should be weighed against the costs and operational limitations of instituting laboratory-based surveillance programs on ships.
Notes
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2003 May 1;36(9):1095-102 PMID 12715302
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Aug;31(2):433-8 PMID 10987701
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Nov;16(11):1731-7 PMID 21029531
Cites: J Travel Med. 2015 Sep-Oct;22(5):306-11 PMID 26031322
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1987 Oct 30;36(42):697-8, 704 PMID 3118162
Cites: J Virol. 2009 Oct;83(19):10309-13 PMID 19605485
Cites: Int Marit Health. 2010;62(4):241-5 PMID 21348018
PubMed ID
29088487 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pattern of passenger injury and illness on expedition cruise ships to Antarctica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260834
Source
J Travel Med. 2014 Jul-Aug;21(4):228-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lusana Schutz
Dan Zak
James F Holmes
Source
J Travel Med. 2014 Jul-Aug;21(4):228-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions
Child
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Motion Sickness - epidemiology - therapy
Risk factors
Ships - statistics & numerical data
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Expedition ships to Antarctica travel to remote areas with limited medical support.
This study determines the rate and patterns of passenger illness and injuries among those traveling on expedition ships to Antarctica. We hypothesize that severe medical conditions are encountered that require physicians serving on these ships to be skilled enough to care for critically ill or injured patients.
We performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records of all passengers who were provided medical care on 26 Antarctica voyages from October 2010 to March 2011 (four different expedition ships). A structured system was used to categorize the diagnoses from each patient encounter. The pattern of traumatic injuries was noted, including location of occurrence. Treatments rendered including patient evacuations were documented. The population is described with incidence rates.
A total of 2,366 passengers traveled on 26 trips, for a total of 34,501 person-days. In all, 680 physician visits were done, including 150 consultations for motion sickness preventive care, leaving 530 visits (15.4 visits per 1,000 person-days) for active medical care. Median age was 50 (range 10-90) years and 51% were females. Incidence rates per 1,000 person-days for the most common processes include motion sickness (4.2), infections (3.5), and injury (2.0). Injuries were more likely to occur on the ship (66%, 95% CI: 54-77%) compared to off the ship (34%, 95% CI: 23-46%). Four subjects (0.12/1,000 person-days) were evacuated (three due to traumatic conditions and one due to medical complications) and one person died (medical complication).
Passengers on expedition ships to Antarctica may experience significant illness and injury. Ship physicians should be aware of the patterns of injuries and illnesses that occur on expedition ships and should have appropriate training to treat various medical and traumatic conditions including life-threatening illnesses.
Notes
Comment In: J Travel Med. 2014 Jul-Aug;21(4):223-424980124
PubMed ID
24831067 View in PubMed
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Routes of M. tuberculosis transmission among merchant seafarers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80472
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):882-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hansen Henrik L
Henrik Andersen Peter
Lillebaek Troels
Author Affiliation
Medical Office of Health, Vejle County, Denmark. hlhansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):882-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
DNA Fingerprinting
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics - isolation & purification
Occupational Exposure
Risk factors
Ships
Travel
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - transmission
Abstract
For centuries, tuberculosis has been identified as a burden to seafarers. In this study, we assessed the magnitude of tuberculosis among merchant seafarers today. Furthermore, we identified the most likely routes of M. tuberculosis transmission by the use of DNA fingerprinting. A database containing all culture-positive tuberculosis cases in Denmark in 1992-2003 was combined with a register on all seafarers and their employment periods aboard Danish ships. All strains of M. tuberculosis were analysed using DNA-subtyping. 64 cases of culture positive tuberculosis among seafarers were identified. The risk of tuberculosis among males was 1.51 (1.10-2.01) compared with the general population. Two of the 64 cases were likely to be shipping-related, 5 were possibly shipping-related, and 10 were less likely to be shipping-related. The remaining 47 cases were very unlikely to be shipping related. Including the 2 first categories, the incidence was 0.09 cases per 1000 y at sea. The excess risk of tuberculosis among active and former Danish seafarers is most probably due to infections acquired in Denmark. Despite multi-cultural crews aboard, including many from high-incidence countries, our study indicates that only limited transmission of M. tuberculosis takes place among crew aboard modern ships or during shore leaves.
PubMed ID
17008232 View in PubMed
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The "Scandinavian Star" ferry disaster 1990--a challenge to forensic odontology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36888
Source
Int J Legal Med. 1992;104(6):339-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
T. Solheim
M. Lorentsen
P K Sundnes
G. Bang
L. Bremnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Pathology, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Legal Med. 1992;104(6):339-45
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autopsy - legislation & jurisprudence
Child
Disaster Planning - legislation & jurisprudence
Disasters
Documentation - methods
Female
Fires - legislation & jurisprudence
Firesetting Behavior - pathology
Forensic Dentistry - methods
Humans
Male
Microcomputers
Middle Aged
Norway
Ships
Software
Abstract
With 158 victims, the fire on board the "Scandinavian Star" was one of the world's worst ferry disasters. A team of identification experts, including dentists, were employed to secure evidence for identification and to remove the victims from the ferry. Four parallel teams, each with 2 dentists, examined and autopsied the victims at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Oslo. Using the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification forms and aided by computers, all victims were identified within 17 days. Dental identity could be established in 107 cases (68%).
PubMed ID
1515361 View in PubMed
Less detail

Telemedical advice to long-distance passenger ferries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29389
Source
J Travel Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;12(5):254-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Olaf C Jensen
Niels Bo Bøggild
Søren Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Maritime Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
J Travel Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;12(5):254-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Critical Illness
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Ships
Telemedicine - statistics & numerical data
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Radio medical (RM) advice for seafarers and traveling passengers is important and can be crucial for the optimal medical treatment on board ships. The aim of this study was to analyze the data from consultations with passenger ferries to identify areas for possible improvements. METHODS: Data from the journals for 1 year from Radio Medical Denmark consultations with the medical officers on passenger ferries were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Two hundred fourteen RM records, 73% pertaining to passengers and 27% for crew members, were analyzed. Passenger patients were generally older and more seriously ill than patients among the crew. A high number of potential and life-threatening medical conditions such as angina pectoris was seen among the passengers, and nine of these patients were evacuated by helicopter. Sixty-three percent (n = 135) of the calls related to pain complaints, and more than half of these involved severe or considerable pain. Only acetaminophen (paracetamol) and opioids were in the ferry medicine chest. At least 77 patients would have benefited from use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The paramedical assistance and the medicine chest contents were considered insufficient in several cases. Passengers and crew members with chronic illnesses should be thoroughly prepared and advised before their travels.
PubMed ID
16256048 View in PubMed
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[The Palme murder, the Estonia shipwreck, the Anna Lindh murder, the tsunami disaster...What makes an event a national trauma?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29212
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Jan 11-17;103(1-2):54-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tom Lundin
Author Affiliation
Katastrofpsykiatri, Kunskapscentrum för katastrofpsykiatri, Uppsala universitet. tom.lundin@akademiska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Jan 11-17;103(1-2):54-5
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Child
Crisis Intervention
Disaster planning
Disasters - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Homicide - history
Humans
Natural Disasters - history
Ships
Sweden
PubMed ID
16465848 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.