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Source
International Affairs 85: 6 (2009) 1215–1232.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Arctic rendered increasingly accessible by the melting of ice as a result of rising global temperatures should not be underestimated. As the region opens to increased human activity such as traffic from commercial shipping, tourism, and oil and gas exploration, soot emitted by maritime vessels and
  1 document  
Author
Ebinger, Charles K.
Zambetakis, Evie
Source
International Affairs 85: 6 (2009) 1215–1232.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1152919
Keywords
Arctic
Enviroment
Indigenous peoples
Sea ice
Melting
Shipping
Governance
Arctic Council
Documents

11_arctic_melt_ebinger_zambetakis.pdf

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Review first six years aboard M.S. Hygiene: Health Department's pioneer "floating health center".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature903
Source
Alaska's Health. 9:6-7.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1951
Author
Gair, C.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health
Source
Alaska's Health. 9:6-7.
Date
1951
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Health ship
Public health nursing
Health status
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1573.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 357.
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The sea ice never stops : Circumpolar Inuit reflections on sea ice use and shipping in Inuit Nunaat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294759
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Canada. v, 56 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
Arctic Council Open Access Repository The Sea Ice Never Stops. Circumpolar Inuit Reflections on Sea Ice Use and Shipping in Inuit Nunaat. 2014-12 Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) http://hdl.handle.net/11374/1478 Disclaimer: This document may not be
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Canada. v, 56 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5045114
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional diet
Climate change
Land and sea harvests
Marine shipping
Commercial fishing
Abstract
From Executive Summary:
This report investigates Inuit use of sea ice. It looks at existing sources of information regarding land use and occupancy to understand sea ice use, augmenting this with responses from interviews with Inuit hunters from Canada, Alaska, Greenland, and Chukotka (Russia) to provide a pan-Inuit perspective. It includes general predictions about the future in light of climate change and reduced sea ice based on the experience and traditional knowledge of Inuit hunters. The central thread running through this study is that Inuit are a maritime people: our entire culture and identity is based on free movement over the sea and sea ice. We rely on free movement, first and foremost, in order to eat, since so much of our diet is derived from hunting. This mobility is also essential in trade, communication, in obtaining supplies for traditional clothing and art, as well as to maintain pride in our rich cultural heritage. In order to take advantage of the sea ice our communities are predominantly coastal and, in some cases, travel by sea is the only means of moving in or out of our homes. Inuit share a common culture based on similar hunting, fishing, and whaling patterns. There are regional variations because certain communities have easier access to various species, however, the centrality of sea ice to our culture and physical survival is something that we hold in common. Because the goal of this report is to give voice to Inuit perspectives and concerns regarding the impact of changes in the Arctic, the text includes many direct quotations from Inuit residents of the North. Many interviewed for this report emphasize the importance of the sea to their everyday lives, and are very concerned that their voices be heard by the people whose decisions will affect their culture and livelihoods. The use of direct quotations is our means of presenting their concerns to a wider public. Please pay close attention to the words of the Inuit hunters. Inuit have lived in the Arctic for thousands of years and intend to live there for thousands more.
Documents

SDWG_INUITAMSA_Doc1_Circumpolar_Inuit_Reflections_Sea_Ice_Shipping_AC_SAO_CA04.pdf

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Special report 'On public health services to isolated areas by using mobile health units.'

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87
Source
1 vol.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
[1953]
Author
[Alaska Dept. of Health].
Source
1 vol.
Date
[1953]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Health services
Transportation
Health ship
X-rays
Immunizations
Health status
Isolation
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1567.
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