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382 records – page 1 of 39.

24-hour dental service for foreign seamen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247141
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1979 Jun;45(6):272
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1979 Jun;45(6):272
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Health Services
Emergency medical services
Humans
Naval Medicine
Ships
PubMed ID
383217 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental exposure to electromagnetic fields from the radar of a naval ship: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256376
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente E Moen
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Nils Bull
Gunnhild Oftedal
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. bente.moen@isf.uib.no.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adult
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radar
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
Part of a crew on a Norwegian naval ship was exposed to the radar waves for approximately 7 min from an American destroyer during an incident at sea in August 2012. Information about the exposure was not given by the navy. This is a description of what happened with the crew on board after this event. 14 persons had been on the ship bridge or outside on the deck during the exposure and the rest of the crew had been inside the ship. 27 persons were examined at a hospital 6-8 months after the event, as they had developeda large number of symptoms from different organ systems. They were very worried about all types of possible adverse health effects due to the incident. All were examined by an occupational physician and anophthalmologist, by an interview, clinical examinations and blood tests at the hospital. The interview of the personnel revealed that they had not experienced any major heating during the episode. Their symptoms developed days or weeks after the radar exposure. They had no objective signs of adverse health effects at the examination related to the incident. Long-term health effect from the exposure is highly unlikely. The development of different symptoms after the incident was probably due to the fear of possible health consequences. Better routines for such incidents at sea should be developed to avoid this type of anxiety.
PubMed ID
24408137 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents with fatal outcome in Finnish leisure boating 1986-1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103579
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Penttilä
J. Pikkarainen
Author Affiliation
Institut für Rechtsmedizin, Universität Helsinki.
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Date
1990
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drowning - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leisure Activities
Risk factors
Ships - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
All 291 fatal accidents (510 persons on board, 318 drowned) in water traffic in Finland in 1986-1988 were investigated by specific teams. Only some data of this extensive investigation are presented in this study. Staggering and falling in boat because of drunkenness, falling over and sinking of boat were the main causes of getting into water of the people aboard. Only 3.5% of the drowned had used life jackets and 9.7% of them could not swim. The reduced ability to swim because of alcohol and the exhaustion were in about half of the drowned the actual cause and the cold water in one third the background factor for drowning. The results indicate that fatal accidents in water traffic are a major problem of males (95.9%) and give important information for countermeasures.
PubMed ID
2241787 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative study of health and liing standard requirements for crew quarters on Italian and other merchant marine ships].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111791
Source
Ann Sanita Pubblica. 1966 Jul-Aug;27(4):803-35
Publication Type
Article

[A comparison of hearing losses in the workers of a shipyard and in loggers in relation to individual risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103534
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J. Pekkarinen
J. Starck
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ear Protective Devices
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Risk factors
Ships
Wood
Abstract
It is suggested that, within the same energy level, an impulse noise is more hazardous to hearing than a permanent noise. To justify this hypothesis, a study was performed with groups of wood-cutters and shipyard workers to investigate different characteristics of noise load (noise levels, noise impulsivity from the outside and under the ear-flaps, noise emission levels with regard to the length of work and using ear-flaps), and hearing losses (both real and forecasted on the Robinson model). To avoid individual factors, a computerized assessment of 38 pairs of workers from both teams was performed (with regard to similar noise emission levels, diastolic pressures, smoking habits, their military service backgrounds as to the service in heavy artillery units, absence of otic diseases, low consumption of salicylates). The results showed that, within the same energy level, the noise in the shipyard was three times as impulsive and more otic disorders inducing than the noise in the wood-cutters' working conditions.
PubMed ID
2276660 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Action on the body of the gassing of the synthetic polymeric materials used on board ships].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254253
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1973 Nov;17(11):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1973

The aftermath of an industrial disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209965
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1997;392:1-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A. Elklit
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1997;392:1-25
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia - psychology
Blast Injuries - psychology
Burns - psychology
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Explosions
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Relief Work
Ships
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
An explosion in a Danish supertanker under construction in 1994 caused the death of six workers and injured 15. Six months later 270 workers took part in this study, which analyses the relationships between objective stressors, the workers' own feelings and the reactions of their families after the explosion together with training, attitude to the workplace, general out-look, and received crisis help. Traumatisation, coping style and crisis support was assessed via the Impact of Event Scale (IES), the Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ) and the Crisis Support Scale (CSS). Emotionally, workers and their families were strongly affected by the explosion. The IES-score was 17.6 and the invasion score 9.1. The degree of traumatisation was higher in the group who had an 'audience position' than in the group who was directly hit by the explosion. Training in rescue work did not protect against adverse effects. Rescue work had a strong impact on the involved. Social support was a significant factor, that seems to buffer negative effects. High level of social integration, effective leadership in the situation, and professional crisis intervention characterised the disaster situation. All the same, 41 per cent of the workers reached the caseness criteria by Horowitz (IES > or = 19).
PubMed ID
9284976 View in PubMed
Less detail

[After ship's accident--physician on duty made wrong decision about ambulance]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54414
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1998 Jan 30;98(5):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1998
Author
J. Berg
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1998 Jan 30;98(5):6-7
Date
Jan-30-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Ambulances
Denmark
Emergency medical services
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Male
Ships
PubMed ID
9528599 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaskan oil spill: health risks uncovered.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4160
Source
Science. 1989 Aug 4;245(4917):463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-4-1989

Alcohol consumption among laid-off workers before and after closure of a Danish ship-yard: a 2-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12684
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(1):107-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
L. Iversen
H. Klausen
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(1):107-9
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - etiology
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Ships
Unemployment
Abstract
The daily consumption of alcohol in a study of a population of Danish ship-yard workers laid off in relation to unexpected closure, was measured in 1976 (7 months before being laid off) and in 1978 (1 1/2 year after being laid off). The study population (N = 88) consisted mostly of skilled male workers. Data in 1976 and 1978 were collected in exactly the same manner. The main findings were that the unemployed workers were more likely to reduce their alcohol consumption than the reemployed workers in the same population-controlling for age. The study brings no evidence which could support the popular belief of a causal relation between unemployed and use of alcohol.
PubMed ID
3952525 View in PubMed
Less detail

382 records – page 1 of 39.