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[The health self-assessment of personnel of water transport].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116671
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;(4):28-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Vagin
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;(4):28-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - standards
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Self-Assessment
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2010 a medical sociologic survey was organized to assess related to health quality of life of 350 sailors aged 20-72 years of Sakhalinskaya oblast. The questionnaire Euro Qul = 5D was applied. The study revealed that in approximately 5% of shipboard personnel are detected such deviations in quality of life as pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression primarily in persons of middle age. Besides, during last year health improvement was mentioned by 15% of respondents independently of age. The 100 points scale was proposed to respondents to assess their health conditions. The average value was 90 points. The survey results demonstrated high assessment of quality of life as related to health of sailors passed the professional selection. This technique can be applied as an additional indicator of sailors' health.
PubMed ID
23373339 View in PubMed
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Dorothea Dix and her two missions of mercy in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229557
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;35(2):139-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
D L Goldman
Author Affiliation
C. F. Menninger Memorial Hospital, Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas 66601-0829.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;35(2):139-43
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Deinstitutionalization
Disaster Planning - history
History, 19th Century
Hospital Design and Construction - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospitals, Psychiatric - history
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Nova Scotia
Patient Advocacy - history
Ships
United States
Abstract
Dorothea Lynde Dix, 19th century defender of the rights of the mentally ill to hospital care, holds a significant place in the history of Nova Scotia. Her two major accomplishments in this province include laying the groundwork for its first psychiatric hospital and the outfitting of treacherous Sable Island with rescue equipment to aid ships stranded off its shore. The techniques that Miss Dix employed in these missions parallel those she successfully used in the establishment of psychiatric hospitals in a number of American states. It will be argued that her influence has been a positive one on the treatment of the mentally ill particularly in light of the failures of the deinstitutionalization movement.
PubMed ID
2180553 View in PubMed
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Hospital admissions before and after shipyard closure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229668
Source
BMJ. 1989 Dec 9;299(6713):1467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1989
Author
P. Sainsbury
Source
BMJ. 1989 Dec 9;299(6713):1467-8
Date
Dec-9-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Hospitalization
Humans
Morbidity
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Ships
Unemployment
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Oct 28;299(6707):1073-62511968
Comment On: BMJ. 1989 Oct 28;299(6707):1073-62511968
PubMed ID
2514852 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of Fumigants and Hazardous Off-gassing Chemicals in Shipping Containers Arriving in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287504
Source
Ann Work Expo Health. 2017 03 01;61(2):195-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-01-2017
Author
Urban Svedberg
Gunnar Johanson
Source
Ann Work Expo Health. 2017 03 01;61(2):195-206
Date
03-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fumigation - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ships - methods
Sweden
Threshold Limit Values
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
Containerized cargo shipment makes up the backbone of international trade. The principal aim of this cross-sectional study was to establish a qualitative and quantitative description of gaseous fumigants and volatile off-gassing substances facing workers tasked with entering shipping containers. A total of 372 packed and 119 empty shipping containers were sampled in six ports and two distribution centers in Sweden. Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and photoionization detection (PID) were the analytical methods applied to the bulk of samples. A small number of adsorbent samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results were compared to Swedish occupational exposure limits (OELs), the closest parallel to relevant work situations. Based on the FTIR analyses, 30 of 249 (12%) containers arrived with concentrations of fumigants and off-gassing substances above the 8-h OELs and close to 7% were above the short-term exposure limits. Eight detected chemicals were classified as carcinogens and 4% of the containers arrived with levels of carcinogens above the OELs, at a maximum 30 times the 8-h OEL. Considerable differences were observed between ports, ranging from 0 to 33% of containers arriving with concentrations above the OELs. It is believed that all observation results, apart from a single instance of a confirmed fumigant, phosphine, at 3 p.p.m., and possibly three instances of carbon dioxide, can be attributed to off-gassing substances. The FTIR methodology proved useful for quick preliminary checks and in-depth screening and identification. The PID method produced both false-negative and false-positive results where only 48% matched the FTIR observations. Adsorbent sampling with GC-MS analysis was useful for confirming volatile organic compounds but was deemed too slow for day-to-day screening. The high frequency of contaminated containers, the detection of several carcinogens, and the sporadic occurrences of high levels of fumigants are serious concerns that need to be properly recognized in order to protect the workers at risk.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Entomol. 2002;47:331-5911729078
Cites: Talanta. 1988 Oct;35(10):775-8218964613
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2010 Mar;67(3):207-1219858536
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2013 Nov;57(9):1128-3723825354
PubMed ID
28395344 View in PubMed
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Referring cruise ship patients to specialists in Norway--a welfare state with a national health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271755
Source
Int Marit Health. 2015;66(2):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Eilif Dahl
Source
Int Marit Health. 2015;66(2):67-71
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergencies
Humans
Medicine
National Health Programs
Naval Medicine - organization & administration
Norway
Referral and Consultation
Ships
Abstract
Northern Europe is a popular cruise destination, but many non-Scandinavian cruise ship's doctors who are used to enthusiastic service from specialists ashore, get frustrated when referring passengers or crew to out-patient medical evaluation. Norway's national health care system is described and used as an example of medical conditions in a welfare state with a relatively well-functioning national health care system: Emergency cases are usually promptly admitted. Out-patient specialist consultations are available in public polyclinics, but waiting time can be considerable, also for patients from ships. Private specialists are fully booked weeks in advance and do not work from Friday to Monday and during holidays. Public and private medical service capacity is significantly reduced during the summer months. Hence, most specialists ashore are not eager to see demanding ship patients. Ship's doctors should limit referral to conditions that require specific procedures that are not available on the vessel but are necessary for the patient to be able to continue cruising or working aboard. Crewmembers who are unfit for work aboard, should instead be signed off and repatriated for diagnostic work-up and follow-up at home. In cases of hospitalisation or necessary referral ashore, the ship's doctor should always confer in advance with the company's ship's port agents and make necessary shore-side arrangements through them.
PubMed ID
26119674 View in PubMed
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A risk analysis of winter navigation in Finnish sea areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268259
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2015 Jun;79:100-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Osiris A Valdez Banda
Floris Goerlandt
Jakub Montewka
Pentti Kujala
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2015 Jun;79:100-16
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Cold Climate
Finland
Models, Theoretical
North Sea
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Safety - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Ships - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
Winter navigation is a complex but common operation in north-European sea areas. In Finnish waters, the smooth flow of maritime traffic and safety of vessel navigation during the winter period are managed through the Finnish-Swedish winter navigation system (FSWNS). This article focuses on accident risks in winter navigation operations, beginning with a brief outline of the FSWNS. The study analyses a hazard identification model of winter navigation and reviews accident data extracted from four winter periods. These are adopted as a basis for visualizing the risks in winter navigation operations. The results reveal that experts consider ship independent navigation in ice conditions the most complex navigational operation, which is confirmed by accident data analysis showing that the operation constitutes the type of navigation with the highest number of accidents reported. The severity of the accidents during winter navigation is mainly categorized as less serious. Collision is the most typical accident in ice navigation and general cargo the type of vessel most frequently involved in these accidents. Consolidated ice, ice ridges and ice thickness between 15 and 40cm represent the most common ice conditions in which accidents occur. Thus, the analysis presented in this article establishes the key elements for identifying the operation types which would benefit most from further safety engineering and safety or risk management development.
PubMed ID
25819212 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian network for assessing the collision induced risk of an oil accident in the Gulf of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268276
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5301-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-2015
Author
Annukka Lehikoinen
Maria Hänninen
Jenni Storgård
Emilia Luoma
Samu Mäntyniemi
Sakari Kuikka
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5301-9
Date
May-5-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Bayes Theorem
Estonia
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Russia
Ships
Abstract
The growth of maritime oil transportation in the Gulf of Finland (GoF), North-Eastern Baltic Sea, increases environmental risks by increasing the probability of oil accidents. By integrating the work of a multidisciplinary research team and information from several sources, we have developed a probabilistic risk assessment application that considers the likely future development of maritime traffic and oil transportation in the area and the resulting risk of environmental pollution. This metamodel is used to compare the effects of two preventative management actions on the tanker collision probabilities and the consequent risk. The resulting risk is evaluated from four different perspectives. Bayesian networks enable large amounts of information about causalities to be integrated and utilized in probabilistic inference. Compared with the baseline period of 2007-2008, the worst-case scenario is that the risk level increases 4-fold by the year 2015. The management measures are evaluated and found to decrease the risk by 4-13%, but the utility gained by their joint implementation would be less than the sum of their independent effects. In addition to the results concerning the varying risk levels, the application provides interesting information about the relationships between the different elements of the system.
PubMed ID
25780862 View in PubMed
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Human impact on the fish diversity in the four largest lakes of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191172
Source
Ambio. 2001 Dec;30(8):522-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
E. Degerman
J. Hammar
P. Nyberg
G. Svärdson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Freshwater Research, SE-178 93 Drottningholm, Sweden.
Source
Ambio. 2001 Dec;30(8):522-8
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Environment
Eutrophication
Fishes
Fresh Water
Humans
Sanitary Engineering - methods
Ships
Sweden
Water Movements
Water Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The four largest Swedish lakes, Vänern, Vättern, Mälaren, Hjälmaren, host important commercial fisheries for char, salmon, trout, whitefish, vendace (cisco), perch, pike-perch, pike and eel, i.e. highly diverse biological resources. Case studies illustrate physical, chemical and biological impacts on some of these commercial species caused by constructions of dams and ship canals, eutrophication, and overexploitation. Although some original species have been lost and a few new species have been added, the recent human interference has basically caused major shifts in dominance of the fish community structures because of eutrophication, alterations in the abundance of eel or crayfish, and due to overfishing. The latter is in some cases caused by the Great Lake Fishery Paradox--in an environment with several predators and competitors, but with ample food resources, especially salmonid fish but also species like pike-perch may adapt a life history favoring growth over sexual maturation. If harvested at a conventional size these populations will decline rapidly due to too small spawning stocks.
PubMed ID
11878026 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric transport of radioactive debris to Norway in case of a hypothetical accident related to the recovery of the Russian submarine K-27.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276214
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:404-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Jerzy Bartnicki
Ingar Amundsen
Justin Brown
Ali Hosseini
Øystein Hov
Hilde Haakenstad
Heiko Klein
Ole Christian Lind
Brit Salbu
Cato C Szacinski Wendel
Martin Album Ytre-Eide
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:404-16
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Norway
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radioisotopes - analysis
Russia
Ships
Abstract
The Russian nuclear submarine K-27 suffered a loss of coolant accident in 1968 and with nuclear fuel in both reactors it was scuttled in 1981 in the outer part of Stepovogo Bay located on the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya. The inventory of spent nuclear fuel on board the submarine is of concern because it represents a potential source of radioactive contamination of the Kara Sea and a criticality accident with potential for long-range atmospheric transport of radioactive particles cannot be ruled out. To address these concerns and to provide a better basis for evaluating possible radiological impacts of potential releases in case a salvage operation is initiated, we assessed the atmospheric transport of radionuclides and deposition in Norway from a hypothetical criticality accident on board the K-27. To achieve this, a long term (33 years) meteorological database has been prepared and used for selection of the worst case meteorological scenarios for each of three selected locations of the potential accident. Next, the dispersion model SNAP was run with the source term for the worst-case accident scenario and selected meteorological scenarios. The results showed predictions to be very sensitive to the estimation of the source term for the worst-case accident and especially to the sizes and densities of released radioactive particles. The results indicated that a large area of Norway could be affected, but that the deposition in Northern Norway would be considerably higher than in other areas of the country. The simulations showed that deposition from the worst-case scenario of a hypothetical K-27 accident would be at least two orders of magnitude lower than the deposition observed in Norway following the Chernobyl accident.
PubMed ID
25804322 View in PubMed
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Main results of the 2012 joint Norwegian-Russian expedition to the dumping sites of the nuclear submarine K-27 and solid radioactive waste in Stepovogo Fjord, Novaya Zemlya.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276218
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:417-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Aleksander Nikitin
Viacheslav Shershakov
Hilde Elise Heldal
Bjørn Lind
Hans-Christian Teien
Ole Christian Lind
Rajdeep Singh Sidhu
Gunnar Bakke
Alexey Kazennov
Denis Grishin
Anastasia Fedorova
Oxana Blinova
Ingrid Sværen
Penny Lee Liebig
Brit Salbu
Cato Christian Wendell
Elisabeth Strålberg
Nailja Valetova
Galina Petrenko
Ivan Katrich
Igor Logoyda
Iolanda Osvath
Isabelle Levy
Jean Bartocci
Mai Khanh Pham
Adam Sam
Hartmut Nies
Anne Liv Rudjord
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:417-26
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Expeditions
Norway
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Russia
Ships
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper reports the main results of the 2012 joint Norwegian-Russian expedition to investigate the radioecological situation of the Stepovogo Fjord on the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya, where the nuclear submarine K-27 and solid radioactive waste was dumped. Based on in situ gamma measurements and the analysis of seawater and sediment samples taken around the submarine, there was no indication of any leakage from the reactor units of K-27. With regard to the radioecological status of Stepovogo Fjord, activity concentrations of all radionuclides in seawater, sediment and biota in 2012 were in general lower than reported from the previous investigations in the 1990s. However in 2012, the activity concentrations of (137)Cs and, to a lesser extent, those of (90)Sr remained elevated in bottom water from the inner part of Stepovogo Fjord compared with surface water and the outer part of Stepovogo Fjord. Deviations from expected (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu activity ratios and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in some sediment samples from the inner part of Stepovogo Fjord observed in this study and earlier studies may indicate the possibility of leakages from dumped waste from different nuclear sources. Although the current environmental levels of radionuclides in Stepovogo Fjord are not of immediate cause for concern, further monitoring of the situation is warranted.
PubMed ID
25716076 View in PubMed
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387 records – page 1 of 39.