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390 records – page 1 of 39.

Sickness and injury in the Navy medical officer's report after Jutland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126632
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 2011;97(3):127-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

Should I stay or should I go? Motivational profiles of Danish seafaring officers and non-officers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134876
Source
Int Marit Health. 2011;62(1):20-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Miia Haka
Daniel F Borch
Chris Jensen
Anja Leppin
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2011;62(1):20-30
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Employment - classification
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Motivation
Naval Medicine
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Personnel Turnover
Ships - manpower
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Workload
Abstract
Other studies have shed light on specific types of seafarers' job stressors and job satisfaction. However, so far there have not been any systematic attempts to capture the motivational profile of seafarers when it comes to both work demands and work resources. The purpose of this study is to explore the motivational profiles of seafarers in the Danish merchant fleet by identifying factors which motivate or demotivate seafarers to stay in their specific profession. Furthermore, we examine if there is a difference in work motivators and demotivators between Danish seafaring officers and non-officers. Material and methods. A questionnaire was sent out to 560 Danish-speaking seafarers with a Danish postal address; 346 seafarers returned the questionnaire, equalling a 61% response rate.
The work motivators which were identified were: duration of home leave, level of responsibility, and level of challenge. The main demotivating factors that were identified were: being away from home, shipping company´s HRM, and regulatory requirements.
The results contribute to a deeper understanding of how seafarers perceive their occupation, and help to identify areas and aspects which might need change if employers want to retain their workforce in the long run. Overall, the results show that most of the job demands and job resources that seafarers perceive are psychosocial. When it comes to the best aspects of seafaring, over 70% of the answers were related to psychosocial factors rather than organizational or structural factors. In relation to the perceived worst aspects in seafaring, about 85% of the responses fell into psychosocial categories. The differences in the motivational profiles of officers and non-officers showed the importance of not only looking at the seafaring profession as a whole but also considering the different characteristics of various jobs onboard.
PubMed ID
21534222 View in PubMed
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"My husband usually makes those decisions": gender, behavior, and attitudes toward the marine environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134882
Source
Environ Manage. 2011 Jul;48(1):70-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Misse Wester
Britta Eklund
Author Affiliation
Division of Philosophy, The Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 78B, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden. misse.wester@abe.kth.se
Source
Environ Manage. 2011 Jul;48(1):70-80
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Oceans and Seas
Recreation - psychology
Scandinavia
Sewage - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Ships - statistics & numerical data
Social Responsibility
Water Pollution - prevention & control
Women - psychology
Abstract
Human behavior impacts the environment we live in. In order to better understand how one group, boat owners, in three Nordic countries adjacent to the Baltic Sea; Sweden, Finland and Denmark, viewed the relationship between the marine environment, leisure boats and issues of responsibility, a survey study was conducted (n = 1701). The results show that there are differences between gender in many areas and those women in general are more environmentally friendly than men in their views and behavior. Men and women seek information about boating by different channels and this knowledge may be used in future information campaigns. Both men and women ranked boat owners as having the lowest impact on the marine environment and perceived these to be responsible for addressing environmental issues caused by leisure boat activities. The results also show that it is important to prove the effectiveness of an environmentally safe product since this factor is ranked higher than price when considering buying a product. The results suggest that once environmentally friendly behavior is established, such as recycling, this behavior continues. One implication of this study is that small changes in human behavior are seen as acceptable but larger commitments are more difficult to achieve. If individuals do not feel responsible for causing environmental damage, this aspect needs to be addressed in information aimed at this group. Novel approaches on framing the information and new ways of disseminating information are needed.
PubMed ID
21533762 View in PubMed
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[The health self-assessment of personnel of water transport].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116671
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;(4):28-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Vagin
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;(4):28-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - standards
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Self-Assessment
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2010 a medical sociologic survey was organized to assess related to health quality of life of 350 sailors aged 20-72 years of Sakhalinskaya oblast. The questionnaire Euro Qul = 5D was applied. The study revealed that in approximately 5% of shipboard personnel are detected such deviations in quality of life as pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression primarily in persons of middle age. Besides, during last year health improvement was mentioned by 15% of respondents independently of age. The 100 points scale was proposed to respondents to assess their health conditions. The average value was 90 points. The survey results demonstrated high assessment of quality of life as related to health of sailors passed the professional selection. This technique can be applied as an additional indicator of sailors' health.
PubMed ID
23373339 View in PubMed
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Dorothea Dix and her two missions of mercy in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229557
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;35(2):139-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
D L Goldman
Author Affiliation
C. F. Menninger Memorial Hospital, Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas 66601-0829.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;35(2):139-43
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Deinstitutionalization
Disaster Planning - history
History, 19th Century
Hospital Design and Construction - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospitals, Psychiatric - history
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Nova Scotia
Patient Advocacy - history
Ships
United States
Abstract
Dorothea Lynde Dix, 19th century defender of the rights of the mentally ill to hospital care, holds a significant place in the history of Nova Scotia. Her two major accomplishments in this province include laying the groundwork for its first psychiatric hospital and the outfitting of treacherous Sable Island with rescue equipment to aid ships stranded off its shore. The techniques that Miss Dix employed in these missions parallel those she successfully used in the establishment of psychiatric hospitals in a number of American states. It will be argued that her influence has been a positive one on the treatment of the mentally ill particularly in light of the failures of the deinstitutionalization movement.
PubMed ID
2180553 View in PubMed
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Hospital admissions before and after shipyard closure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229668
Source
BMJ. 1989 Dec 9;299(6713):1467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1989
Author
P. Sainsbury
Source
BMJ. 1989 Dec 9;299(6713):1467-8
Date
Dec-9-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Hospitalization
Humans
Morbidity
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Ships
Unemployment
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Oct 28;299(6707):1073-62511968
Comment On: BMJ. 1989 Oct 28;299(6707):1073-62511968
PubMed ID
2514852 View in PubMed
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Referring cruise ship patients to specialists in Norway--a welfare state with a national health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271755
Source
Int Marit Health. 2015;66(2):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Eilif Dahl
Source
Int Marit Health. 2015;66(2):67-71
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergencies
Humans
Medicine
National Health Programs
Naval Medicine - organization & administration
Norway
Referral and Consultation
Ships
Abstract
Northern Europe is a popular cruise destination, but many non-Scandinavian cruise ship's doctors who are used to enthusiastic service from specialists ashore, get frustrated when referring passengers or crew to out-patient medical evaluation. Norway's national health care system is described and used as an example of medical conditions in a welfare state with a relatively well-functioning national health care system: Emergency cases are usually promptly admitted. Out-patient specialist consultations are available in public polyclinics, but waiting time can be considerable, also for patients from ships. Private specialists are fully booked weeks in advance and do not work from Friday to Monday and during holidays. Public and private medical service capacity is significantly reduced during the summer months. Hence, most specialists ashore are not eager to see demanding ship patients. Ship's doctors should limit referral to conditions that require specific procedures that are not available on the vessel but are necessary for the patient to be able to continue cruising or working aboard. Crewmembers who are unfit for work aboard, should instead be signed off and repatriated for diagnostic work-up and follow-up at home. In cases of hospitalisation or necessary referral ashore, the ship's doctor should always confer in advance with the company's ship's port agents and make necessary shore-side arrangements through them.
PubMed ID
26119674 View in PubMed
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ARCHAEOLOGY. Megaproject asks: What drove the Vikings?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272191
Source
Science. 2016 Apr 15;352(6283):280-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2016
Author
Andrew Lawler
Source
Science. 2016 Apr 15;352(6283):280-1
Date
Apr-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archaeology
Estonia
History, Ancient
Humans
Ships
Skeleton
Slavery - history
Sweden
PubMed ID
27081048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Commercial fishing deaths - United States, 2000-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96344
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-2010
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Date
Jul-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality - prevention & control
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Commerce
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Ships
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States. During 1992-2008, an annual average of 58 reported deaths occurred (128 deaths per 100,000 workers), compared with an average of 5,894 deaths (four per 100,000 workers) among all U.S. workers. During the 1990s, safety interventions addressing specific hazards identified in Alaska resulted in a significant decline in the state's commercial fishing fatality rate. During 2007-2010, CDC expanded surveillance of commercial fishing fatalities to the rest of the country's fishing areas. To review the hazards and risk factors for occupational mortality in the U.S. commercial fishing industry, and to explore how hazards and risk factors differ among fisheries and locations, CDC collected and analyzed data on each fatality reported during 2000-2009. This report summarizes the results, which showed that, among the 504 U.S. commercial fishing deaths, the majority occurred after a vessel disaster (261 deaths, 52%) or a fall overboard (155 deaths, 31%). By region, 133 (26%) deaths occurred off the coast of Alaska, 124 (25%) in the Northeast, 116 (23%) in the Gulf of Mexico, 83 (16%) off the West Coast, and 41 (8%) in the Mid- and South Atlantic. Type of fishing was known in 478 deaths; shellfish (226, 47%) was the most common, followed by groundfish (144, 30%) and pelagic fish (97, 20%). To reduce fatalities in this industry, additional prevention measures tailored to specific high-risk fisheries and focusing on prevention of vessel disasters and falls overboard are needed.
PubMed ID
20631673 View in PubMed
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Fatal occupational accidents in Danish fishing vessels 1989-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92749
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2008 Jun;15(2):109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Laursen Lise H
Hansen Henrik L
Jensen Olaf C
Author Affiliation
Centre of Maritime Health and Safety, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark. lisehl@dadlnet.dk
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2008 Jun;15(2):109-17
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Drowning - epidemiology
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ships - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to study the circumstances and incidence rates of fatal accidents in inspection obligated and non-inspection obligated Danish fishing vessels to identify areas for prevention. Information about the fatalities came from maritime authority reports, including vessel disaster reports, post mortem reports, maritime inquiries and police reports. The person- and vessel years at risk came from the Danish Directorate of Fisheries. During the period 1989-2005, 114 fatalities occurred. Sixty-one of the fatalities occurred in 36 vessel disasters mainly caused by foundering/capsizing due to stability changes in rough weather and collisions; 39 fatal occupational accidents mainly occurred on the larger inspection obligated trawlers during fishing. In the remaining 14 other fatal accidents, the main causal factors were difficult embarking/disembarking conditions by darkness in foreign ports and alcohol intoxication. In the period 1995-2005, the overall incidence rate was 10 per 10,000 fishermen per year with no down-going trend during that period. The fatal accident rates are still too high, despite the efforts to reduce the risk. Increased focus on regular and repeated safety training for all fishermen and improved safety measures are needed, especially in the underscored areas of sea disasters concerning small vessels and occupational accidents on big vessels. Better registration of time at risk for fishermen is needed to validate the effect of the safety measures.
PubMed ID
18642168 View in PubMed
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390 records – page 1 of 39.