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Abortion ethics--women's post abortion assessments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64698
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Jul;73(6):492-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
K. Holmgren
N. Uddenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Jul;73(6):492-6
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Ethics
Female
Guilt
Humans
Interviews
Maternal-Fetal Relations
Moral Development
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Qualitative Research
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Induced abortion is often discussed in terms of ethics. The aim of the present report is to describe the abortion ethics as it was expressed by women undergoing a legal abortion. OBJECTIVE. Moral considerations expressed during semistructured interviews by 128 women two weeks after a first trimester abortion in Stockholm 1987-90 are reported. RESULT. The women had faced a choice between abortion and parenthood. At the time of the abortion many of them were living under conditions that meant they were unable to offer a child the security they regarded as a child's right. The conflict the women spontaneously described as their main moral dilemma was not a conflict between the woman and the fetus, but a conflict between several close relationships, also concerning the prospective father. The ethics that the women applied to the problems of abortion was founded on a long-term responsibility to care for persons in their relationships. CONCLUSION. The women interviewed had three levels of moral reasoning simultaneously present. 1. A theoretical level--most of all concerning other women--a liberal view of rights: abortion should be a freely obtainable option. 2. A theoretical level--above all, concerning themselves--a restrictive deontological view: the extinction of life is morally wrong and should be avoided. 3. A practical level--when the problem was a reality: a consequentialist ethics of care. According to this ethics of care it was important that the abortion could be performed as early as possible during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
8042463 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in middle-aged women: narrations from the patients and their partners during rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54063
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2000 Aug;16(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M. Svedlund
I. Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund. Marianne.Svedlund@hvs.mh.se
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2000 Aug;16(4):256-65
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Denial (Psychology)
Emotions
Fear
Female
Freedom
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shame
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of lived experiences after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and being a partner to an afflicted woman, as it is narrated during rehabilitation. Nine women and their partners narrated their experiences three and twelve months after AMI. The interview texts were transcribed and then interpreted, using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The result showed that their experiences of the illness contained two themes: 'rehabilitation needed' and 'loss of freedom' which contains eight sub-themes; 'adapting to it', 'struggling against it', 'living as normally as possible', 'having insight into how it can be', 'feeling guilty and ashamed about being weak', 'withholding feelings', 'feeling useless', and 'feeling fatigued and losing strength'. After further interpretation, the themes gave a deeper meaning of living with AMI and how it affects women and their partners. The women conceded that they felt distressed and vulnerable but struggled against the fear the illness means. The partner's role appears to be one of trying to adapt to the women's experiences of the illness. That the women withheld their feelings and did not talk about them indicates a lack of communication between the couples. As coronary care nurses often come very close both to the afflicted persons and the relatives they fill an important function in each patient's recovery. The nurses could help and prepare the patients and their relatives to understand better such feelings and reactions as could appear after discharge from hospital.
PubMed ID
10922190 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
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"A fool to keep staying": battered women labeling themselves stupid as an expression of gendered shame.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98680
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Jan;16(1):5-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Viveka Enander
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. aqut@hotmail.com
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Jan;16(1):5-31
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
Domestic Violence - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Intelligence
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Self Concept
Shame
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In this qualitative study with women who have left abusive heterosexual relationships, the informants labeling themselves stupid is investigated. Several different meanings ascribed to stupidity were found, with feeling stupid for allowing oneself to be mistreated and for staying in the abusive relationship as main themes. Four frames for interpreting the findings are presented: abusive relationship dynamics, gendered shame, the gender-equality-oriented Nordic context, and leaving processes. It is proposed that feeling- and labeling oneself-stupid is an expression of gendered shame or, more explicitly, of battered shame.
PubMed ID
19949227 View in PubMed
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An interactional perspective on the relationship of immigration to intimate partner violence in a representative sample of help-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100662
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Oct;25(10):1815-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Solveig Karin Bø Vatnar
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway. solveig.vatnar@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Oct;25(10):1815-35
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Guilt
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Questionnaires
Sexual Partners
Shame
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
This article reports a study of the possible impact of immigration on interactional aspects of intimate partner violence (IPV) among help-seeking women. Are there differences concerning (a) IPV categories, (b) IPV severity, frequency, duration, regularity, and predictability, (c) guilt and shame, (d) partners' ethnicity, and (e) children being exposed to interparental IPV, adjusted for sociodemographic variables? A representative sample of IPV help-seeking women (N = 157) recruited from family counseling, police, and shelters in Norway were interviewed. Multivariate analyses showed that immigrant women had lower income, were less likely to use alcohol and had increased likelihood of having an immigrant partner. No differences were found concerning IPV severity, frequency, guilt, shame, or victimization pertaining to different IPV categories. Immigrant women were better at predicting physical IPV but had an increased risk of physical injury related to sexual IPV. Children's risk of being exposed to interparental IPV increased if parents were immigrants. Psychosocial consequences of being an immigrant such as having a lower sociodemographic rank rather than IPV aspects constituted the main difference between ethnic Norwegian and immigrant help-seeking women.
PubMed ID
20040712 View in PubMed
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Are improvements in shame and self-compassion early in eating disorders treatment associated with better patient outcomes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106757
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2014 Jan;47(1):54-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Allison C Kelly
Jacqueline C Carter
Sahar Borairi
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada.
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2014 Jan;47(1):54-64
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Eating Disorders - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory
Predictive value of tests
Psychotherapy - methods
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Shame
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Compassion-focused therapy (CFT; Gilbert, 2005, 2009) is a transdiagnostic treatment approach focused on building self-compassion and reducing shame. It is based on the theory that feelings of shame contribute to the maintenance of psychopathology, whereas self-compassion contributes to the alleviation of shame and psychopathology. We sought to test this theory in a transdiagnostic sample of eating disorder patients by examining whether larger improvements in shame and self-compassion early in treatment would facilitate faster eating disorder symptom remission over 12 weeks. Participants were 97 patients with an eating disorder admitted to specialized day hospital or inpatient treatment. They completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Experiences of Shame Scale, and Self-Compassion Scale at intake, and again after weeks 3, 6, 9, and 12. Multilevel modeling revealed that patients who experienced greater decreases in their level of shame in the first 4 weeks of treatment had faster decreases in their eating disorder symptoms over 12 weeks of treatment. In addition, patients who had greater increases in their level of self-compassion early in treatment had faster decreases in their feelings of shame over 12 weeks, even when controlling for their early change in eating disorder symptoms. These results suggest that CFT theory may help to explain the maintenance of eating disorders. Clinically, findings suggest that intervening with shame early in treatment, perhaps by building patients' self-compassion, may promote better eating disorders treatment response.
PubMed ID
24115289 View in PubMed
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Assessment of self-conscious emotions: a Swedish psychometric and structure evaluation of the Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92164
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2009 Feb;50(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Strömsten Lotta M J
Henningsson Mikael
Holm Ulla
Sundbom Elisabet
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lotta.stromsten@psy.umu.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2009 Feb;50(1):71-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Guilt
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
The Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA) is a well-established scenario-based questionnaire assessing self-conscious emotions, such as shame and guilt, which have been shown to be differentially associated with a variety of functional, motivational, behavioral and health outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and internal structure of a Swedish version of TOSCA in a sample of 361 healthy adults. The psychometric properties and internal consistency of the Swedish version were at level with the original US TOSCA version for shame, guilt and detachment. The internal structure of the Swedish version was acceptable for shame, guilt and detachment but contained shortcomings in assessment of externalization.
PubMed ID
18771478 View in PubMed
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Body-related state shame and guilt in women: do causal attributions mediate the influence of physical self-concept and shame and guilt proneness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107259
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Peter R E Crocker
Sara M Brune
Kent C Kowalski
Diane E Mack
Philip M Wilson
Catherine M Sabiston
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: peter.crocker@ubc.ca.
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):19-26
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Image - psychology
Canada
Emotions - physiology
Female
Guilt
Humans
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Shame
Students - psychology
Women - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Guided by the process model of self-conscious emotions, this study examined whether physical self-concept (PSC) and shame and guilt proneness were associated with body-related self-conscious emotions of state shame and guilt and if these relationships were mediated by attributions of stability, globality, and controllability. Female participants (N=284; Mean age=20.6±1.9 years) completed measures of PSC and shame and guilt proneness before reading a hypothetical scenario. Participants completed measures of attributions and state shame and guilt in response to the scenario. Significant relationships were noted between state shame and attributions of globality and controllability, and shame proneness, guilt proneness, and PSC. Similar relationships, with the additional predictor of stability, were found for state guilt. Mediation analysis partially supported the process model hypotheses for shame. Results indicate PSC and shame proneness are important in predicting body-related emotions, but the role of specific attributions are still unclear.
PubMed ID
24035310 View in PubMed
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Breast-feeding still faces many roadblocks, national survey finds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211880
Source
CMAJ. 1996 May 15;154(10):1569-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1996
Author
P. Sullivan
Source
CMAJ. 1996 May 15;154(10):1569-70
Date
May-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding
Canada
Fathers - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mothers - education - psychology
Pregnancy
Shame
Abstract
Although breast-feeding receives strong support from physicians, recent focus groups conducted for Health Canada found that it still faces roadblocks because some new mothers find it too embarrassing. In some cases, their male partners oppose breast-feeding. The solution appears to be more and better education provided very early in pregnancy. There is also a need to "spell out explicitly" the role male partners can play in supporting breast-feeding.
PubMed ID
8625012 View in PubMed
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Broken and guilty since it happened: A population study of trauma-related shame and guilt after violence and sexual abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286929
Source
J Affect Disord. 2016 Nov 01;204:16-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-01-2016
Author
Helene Flood Aakvaag
Siri Thoresen
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
Grete Dyb
Espen Røysamb
Miranda Olff
Source
J Affect Disord. 2016 Nov 01;204:16-23
Date
Nov-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - diagnosis - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Guilt
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychological Trauma - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Sex Offenses - psychology
Shame
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - psychology
Violence - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
There is increasing interest in trauma-related shame and guilt. However, much remains unknown in terms of how these emotions relate to the type of event, gender and mental health. We investigated shame and guilt in men and women following various types of severe violence and their relation to mental health.
Telephone interviews were conducted with a Norwegian general population sample (n=4529; age=18-75; response rate=42.9%). Measures included child sexual abuse, child and adult rape, severe physical violence from/between parents, severe violence from a partner and non-partners, less severe violence and non-violent trauma, the new Shame and Guilt After Trauma Scale, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Analyses included t-tests and linear regressions.
All types of severe violence were significantly associated with trauma-related shame and guilt (coefficients from 0.11 to 0.38, p-values
PubMed ID
27318595 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.