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2004 Canadian sexually transmitted infections surveillance report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162588
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2007 May;33 Suppl 1:1-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007

Acquisition and persistence of human papillomavirus infection in younger men: a prospective follow-up study among Danish soldiers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67165
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jun;14(6):1528-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Susanne Krüger Kjaer
Christian Munk
Jeanette Falck Winther
Hans Ole Jørgensen
Chris J L M Meijer
Adriaan J C van den Brule
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. susanne@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jun;14(6):1528-33
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus Infections - classification - epidemiology - transmission
Risk factors
Serotyping
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
No data is yet available on incidence or persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men. We enrolled 374 younger male conscripts (18-29 years) in a prospective study, and they were examined twice with an interval of 6 to 8 months. Data collection included a questionnaire and a sample of cells from the penis for HPV detection using PCR. In addition, the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis DNA was assessed in urine samples by means of PCR.The HPV prevalence at the first and second examinations was 33.8% and 31.9%, respectively. The acquisition rate of HPV (overall) during follow-up was 13.8%, and nearly one fourth of the participants were HPV positive at both examinations. Number of sex partners during follow-up was the most important risk factor for acquiring HPV (odds ratio, 17.2; 95% confidence interval, 4.6-64.7, for > or = 3 partners versus
PubMed ID
15941967 View in PubMed
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Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Oct;78(5):352-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
K. Edgardh
Author Affiliation
Department of Venhälsan, Karolinska Institute, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.edgardh@ulleval.no
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Oct;78(5):352-6
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child Abuse, Sexual - statistics & numerical data
Contraception - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex
Sex Education - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Sweden, society's attitudes towards teenage sexual relationships are liberal, and sexual and reproductive health issues are given high priority. Family and sex education has been taught in schools since the 1950s. The age of sexual consent is 15 years. Since 1975, abortion has been free on demand. Contraceptive counselling is free, easily available at family planning and youth health clinics. Screening for genital chlamydial infection is performed at these clinics, thus providing a "one stop shop" service. Condoms and oral contraception are available at low cost, emergency contraception is sold over the counter. Teenage childbearing is uncommon. However, sexual and reproductive health problems are on the increase among young people. During the 1990s, a period of economic stagnation in Sweden, schools have suffered budget cut backs. Sex education is taught less. Social segregation, school non-attendance, smoking, and drug use have increased. Teenage abortion rates have gone up, from 17/1000 in 1995 to 22.5/1000 in 2001. Genital chlamydial infections have increased from 14,000 cases in 1994 to 22,263 cases in 2001, 60% occurring among young people, and with the steepest increase among teenagers. Thus, a question of major concern is whether and how adolescent sexual behaviour has shifted towards more risky practices during the late 1990s.
PubMed ID
12407239 View in PubMed
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Age of sexual debut related to life-style and reproductive health factors in a group of Swedish teenage girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11242
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 May;75(5):484-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
A. Andersson-Ellström
L. Forssman
I. Milsom
Author Affiliation
Center for Public Health Research, Karstad, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 May;75(5):484-9
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Adolescent
Age Factors
Coitus
Contraception Behavior
Female
Humans
Life Style
Motivation
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM. To compare life-style and reproductive health care factors in girls with a coitus debut or = 15 years and 17 girls (19.3%) had not had their sexual debut on completion of this study. Girls with an early sexual debut had a greater number of sexually transmitted diseases (p two brothers and/or sisters (p
PubMed ID
8677776 View in PubMed
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AIDS related changes in pattern of sexually transmitted disease (STD) in an STD clinic in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8592
Source
Genitourin Med. 1988 Aug;64(4):270-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
C S Petersen
J. Søndergaard
G L Wantzin
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatovenereology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Genitourin Med. 1988 Aug;64(4):270-2
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Herpes Genitalis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Syphilis - epidemiology
Abstract
Testing for antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was introduced in 1984 in this major sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Copenhagen, which is attended by about 10,000 new patients each year. From 1984 to 1987 the proportion of patients examined for antibodies to HIV rose from 6% to 32%. The overall incidence of HIV antibody positivity decreased from 30% in 1984 to 3% in 1987, the combined result of decreased positivity in high risk patients tested and increased screening in low risk patients. HIV antibody positivity has been confined largely to homosexual men and drug addicts. Since 1985, however, 21 out of 2623 (0.8%) heterosexuals who were not drug addicts were found to be HIV antibody positive. During 1984-6 the incidence of STDs most often encountered in high risk groups (syphilis and gonorrhoea) decreased by 64% and 41% respectively, whereas the incidence of diseases most often diagnosed in low risk groups (condylomata acuminata and genital herpes) increased by 70% and 34% respectively in the same period. The addition of HIV infection to the list of STDs requires the allocation of more resources to the STD clinics to enable these clinics to handle this new problem. Screening for all patients attending an STD clinic for antibodies to HIV must be considered, and in our area it would be cost effective.
PubMed ID
3169758 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and HIV Risk Among Russian Women of Childbearing Age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290279
Source
AIDS Behav. 2017 Jul; 21(7):1857-1867
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Tatiana Balachova
Alla Shaboltas
Andrey Nasledov
Mark Chaffin
Julia Batluk
Som Bohora
Barbara Bonner
Kendall Bryant
Larissa Tsvetkova
Elena Volkova
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 940 N.E. 13th Street, Nicholson Tower, Suite 4900, Oklahoma City, OK, 73104, USA. Tatiana-Balachova@ouhsc.edu.
Source
AIDS Behav. 2017 Jul; 21(7):1857-1867
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Unsafe Sex - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Russia has one of the fastest rising rates of HIV among women in the world. This study sought to identify key factors in HIV transmission among women in Russia. Data were collected as part of a larger clinical trial to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP). Women at risk for an AEP were recruited at women's clinics; 708 women, aged 18-44 (M = 29.04 years), completed HIV risk surveys. Structural Equation Modeling was used to test the relationships between alcohol use and sex behavior constructs with HIV/STI risk. While the model indicated that multiple factors are involved in women's HIV/STI risk, the independent alcohol use variable explains 20 % of the variance in women's HIV/STI risk. The findings suggest that alcohol use directly and indirectly predicts HIV/STI risk among women, and its effect is mediated by alcohol use before sex.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27605367 View in PubMed
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[A method for studying the morbidity risk for sexually transmitted infections in youthful populations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214738
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1995 Jul-Aug;(4):82-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
O A Nikolaev
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1995 Jul-Aug;(4):82-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Algorithms
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
HIV-1
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The method, developed on the basis of disperse analysis, includes anonymous questioning by multicomponent questionnaires containing several blocks of questions which cover the social composition, level of knowledge, behavioral and sexual orientation, control of the reliability of answers, etc. The correlative dependence of individual blocks permits the evaluation of the level and dynamics of the formation of microsocial environment at an institution. The use of this method makes it possible to differentiate youth subpopulations by the epidemiological importance of their risk of infection and its elements in the structure of an individual institution, to find out behavioral "groups of risk" and, in accordance with the data thus obtained, to build the system of propaganda adapted to these individual subpopulations and to the whole institution.
PubMed ID
9381881 View in PubMed
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An argument for practice-based public health research on sexually transmitted infection management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133144
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2011 Jul-Aug;28(4):357-65
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patrick O'Byrne
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. pjobyrne@uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2011 Jul-Aug;28(4):357-65
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Evidence-Based Practice - methods
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Public Health Practice - statistics & numerical data
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - therapy - transmission
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Over the last few years, the rates of certain sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have again begun to rise in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Paradoxically, these increases are occurring at the same time that greater numbers of researchers are publishing reports about highly successful safer sex interventions. Research that investigates this phenomenon reveals that the majority of new STIs management initiatives never reach day-to-day practice after the research period has terminated. In reaction to this, it is suggested here that researchers should begin developing their STIs management interventions in practice-based settings, with a strong emphasis being placed on ensuring target group input from the outset. While such an approach may not be able to discern precise cause-and-effect relationships, it has the benefit of enhancing use after researchers have withdrawn their support. The benefits that arise from long-term and widespread use of this approach may therefore outweigh the advantages that can occur from developing highly efficacious, but unused, STIs management strategies.
PubMed ID
21736614 View in PubMed
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331 records – page 1 of 34.