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Acceptability of home-use of misoprostol in medical abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63306
Source
Contraception. 2004 Nov;70(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Christian Fiala
Beverly Winikoff
Lotti Helström
Margareta Hellborg
Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Division for Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Contraception. 2004 Nov;70(5):387-92
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Administration
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Home-use of misoprostol would reduce the number of visits and improve access to medical abortion. We evaluated acceptance of home-use of misoprostol among women and their partners. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred women with up to 49 days of amenorrhea were given mifepristone, followed by misoprostol taken at home. RESULTS: Women chose home-use of misoprostol because it felt more natural, private and allowed the presence of a partner/friend. Two women had a vacuum aspiration due to incomplete abortion. Five unscheduled visits occurred. Ninety-six women were satisfied with their choice of home-use. The male partners were generally satisfied with their partner's choice of home-use and felt that their presence and support had been valuable. DISCUSSION: Our study shows a high acceptability among women and their partners and confirms the safety and efficacy of home-use of misoprostol. Women should be offered this choice to allow more flexibility and privacy in their abortions.
PubMed ID
15504378 View in PubMed
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Adjustment among mothers reporting same-gender sexual partners: a study of a representative population sample from Quebec Province (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162178
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Danielle Julien
Emilie Jouvin
Emilie Jodoin
Alexandre L'archevêque
Elise Chartrand
Author Affiliation
Département de psychologie, University of Quebec at Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Centreville, Montreal, QC, Canada. julien.danielle@uqam.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bisexuality - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parenting - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We examined the well-being of mothers and non-mothers reporting exclusive opposite-gender sexual partners (OG), same-gender sexual partners (SG), or both (BI) in a representative sample of 20,773 participants (11,034 women) 15-years-old or older from the population of Quebec province in Canada. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire and SG and BI women (n = 179) were matched to a sample of OG women (n = 179) based on age, income, geographical area, and children (having at least one 18-year-old or younger biological or adopted child at home). We assessed social milieu variables, risk factors for health disorders, mental health, and quality of mothers' relationship with children. The findings indicated a sexual orientation main effect: Mothers and non-mothers in the SG and BI group, as compared to their OG controls, were significantly less likely to live in a couple relationship, had significantly lower levels of social support, higher prevalence of early negative life events, substance abuse, suicide ideation, and higher levels of psychological distress. There were no Sexual Orientation X Parenthood status effects. The results further indicated that sexual orientation did not account for unique variance in women's psychological distress beyond that afforded by their social milieu, health risk factors, and parenthood status. No significant differences were found for the quality of mothers' relationship with children. SG-BI and OG mothers with low levels of social integration were significantly more likely to report problems with children than parents with high levels of social integration. We need to understand how marginal sexualities and their associated social stigma, as risk indicators for mothers, interact with other factors to impact family life, parenting skills, and children's adjustment.
PubMed ID
17665300 View in PubMed
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Age at first alcoholic drink as predictor of current HIV sexual risk behaviors among a sample of injection drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs who are sexual partners of IDUs, in St. Petersburg, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132619
Source
AIDS Behav. 2012 Aug;16(6):1597-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Nadia Abdala
Nathan B Hansen
Olga V Toussova
Tatiana V Krasnoselskikh
Andrei P Kozlov
Robert Heimer
Author Affiliation
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. nadia.abdala@yale.edu
Source
AIDS Behav. 2012 Aug;16(6):1597-604
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Drug users
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigates whether age at first alcoholic drink is associated with sexual risk behaviors among injection drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs who are sexual partners of IDUs in St. Petersburg, Russia. A path analysis was used to test a model of age at first drink, age at sexual debut, age at first drug use, current substance use patterns and current sexual risk behaviors among 558 participants. Results revealed that age at first drink had an effect on multiple sex partners through age at sexual debut and injection drug use, but no effect on unprotected sex. Age at first drug use was not related to sexual risk behaviors. Investigation of age of drinking onset may provide useful information for programs to reduce sexual risk behaviors and injection drug use. Different paths leading to unprotected sex and multiple sexual partners call for different approaches to reduce sexual risk behaviors among this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21800183 View in PubMed
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Age at first intercourse, number of partners and sexually transmitted infection prevalence among Danish, Norwegian and Swedish women: estimates and trends from nationally representative cross-sectional surveys of more than 100 000 women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308984
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2020 02; 99(2):175-185
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2020
Author
Bo T Hansen
Susanne K Kjaer
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Kai-Li Liaw
Kirsten E Juul
Louise T Thomsen
Kirsten Frederiksen
K Miriam Elfström
Christian Munk
Mari Nygård
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2020 02; 99(2):175-185
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sexual behavior at the population level impacts on public health. Recent representative sexual behavior data are lacking.
Cross-sectional surveys in 2005 and 2012 on women age 18-45 years randomly selected from the general population in Denmark (n = 40 804), Norway (n = 30 331) and Sweden (n = 32 114).
Median (interquartile range) age at first intercourse was 16 (15-18) years in Denmark, 17 (16-18) years in Norway, and 17 (15-18) years in Sweden. Women in the most recent birth cohort had sexual debut at the lowest age, and were most likely to have sexual debut before the legal age of consent. Proportions with debut age =14 years among women born 1989-1994 vs 1971-1976, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) were: 18.4% vs 10.9%, 1.95 (1.74-2.18) in Denmark, 12.9% vs 6.3%, 2.38 (2.01-2.82) in Norway, 17.8% vs 11.4%, 1.75 (1.55-1.98) in Sweden. Median (interquartile range) number of lifetime sexual partners was 6 (3-10) in Denmark, 5 (2-10) in Norway, and 6 (3-11) in Sweden. The proportion of women reporting >10 sexual partners was also highest in the most recent survey. The percentage with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) in 2012 vs 2005 surveys were: 24.9% vs 22.8%, 1.13 (1.07-1.18) for Denmark; 23.8% vs 19.8%, 1.27 (1.19-1.34) for Norway; and 28.3% vs 23.8%, 1.31 (1.24-1.38) for Sweden. Similarly, the proportion of women reporting ever having had a sexually transmitted infection among women age
PubMed ID
31529491 View in PubMed
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Agreement in Swedish childless couples' reproductive intentions in relation to age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268612
Source
Midwifery. 2014 Mar;30(3):e43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
E. Schytt
Source
Midwifery. 2014 Mar;30(3):e43-8
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infertility - psychology
Male
Sexual Partners
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
to investigate the agreement in Swedish childless couples' reproductive intentions, in terms of (1) expecting to have children or not, (2) time point for a first child, and (3) number of children, in relation to age.
cross-sectional data from the Swedish Young Adult Panel Study in 2009.
Sweden.
216 childless couples (216 women and 216 men)
questionnaire data on reproductive intentions. Descriptive analyses including Cohen's kappa were conducted for all couples, both for younger and older couples, where the woman was below or above the mean age for having the first child in Sweden, namely = 28 years (younger) and = 29 years (older).
agreement in the partners' expectations whether to have children or not was substantial but far from perfect (?=0.69), and it was higher in older couples (?=0.70) than in younger ones (?=0.51). Compared with younger couples, a higher proportion of older couples agreed not to have children or were uncertain (32% versus 5%; p
PubMed ID
24252710 View in PubMed
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The AIDS epidemic among Scandinavian women: 1980-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7988
Source
AIDS. 1994 May;8(5):689-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
E. Smith
V. Hasseltvedt
M. Böttiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
AIDS. 1994 May;8(5):689-92
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - epidemiology
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Female
HIV Infections - transmission
Humans
Life tables
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe trends and patterns in the AIDS epidemic among Scandinavian women with AIDS. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All women with AIDS reported to national surveillance units in Denmark, Norway and Sweden in 1980-1990 were included for analyses. RESULTS: The number of heterosexually infected female AIDS cases increased over time. AIDS-defining diseases varied with transmission categories, a variation similar to that found among heterosexual Danish male AIDS cases. Heterosexually infected women were more frequently diagnosed with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia than with oesophagus candidiasis compared with intravenous drug using women. Twenty-five out of 56 heterosexually infected women reported having a male partner who was bisexual or from a Pattern II country, while one in four did not recognize any risk in their sex partner(s). Survival time increased between 1980 and 1990 and did not differ from survival in male AIDS cases. In a proportional hazards model, age, year of diagnosis and the duration of known HIV-positivity before development of AIDS had an independent impact on survival. The number of women known to be HIV-positive for more than 1 year before diagnosis of AIDS increased over time, although the number of women tested for HIV close to the development of AIDS was especially high among heterosexually infected women. CONCLUSION: Increasing numbers of heterosexually infected women are being diagnosed with AIDS in Scandinavia.
PubMed ID
8060549 View in PubMed
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AIDS in Canada: incidence among women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232479
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1988 Sep 3;14(35):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-3-1988
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1988 Sep 3;14(35):157-60
Date
Sep-3-1988
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
Canada
Female
Humans
Sexual Partners
PubMed ID
3228887 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDS optimism, condom fatigue, or self-esteem? Explaining unsafe sex among gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173573
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Barry D Adam
Winston Husbands
James Murray
John Maxwell
Author Affiliation
University of Windsor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. adam@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
Adult
Bisexuality - psychology
Condoms - utilization
Depression - psychology
Erectile Dysfunction - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interview, Psychological
Intuition
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Unsafe Sex - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines leading explanations for unsafe sex in light of in-depth interviews with 102 high-risk gay and bisexual men in Toronto to see how well they engage with the social circumstances and reasoning processes of men in their sexual relationships. We argue that there is an inadequate fit between some of the leading explanations and the discursive accounts provided by high risk men themselves. Their accounts focus on unsafe sex occurring as a resolution to condom and erectile difficulties, through momentary lapses and trade offs, out of personal turmoil and depression, and as a byproduct of strategies of disclosure and intuiting safety. This study examines, in particular the circumstances and rationales associated with men who identify their practices as "barebacking." We conclude with recommendations for communicating prevention messages to those most at risk based on the self-understandings of gay and bisexual men who most frequently practice unprotected sex.
PubMed ID
19817037 View in PubMed
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Aids-related knowledge and practices in migrant populations: the case of Montrealers of Haitian origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219237
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1994;42(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Adrien
J F Boivin
C. Hankins
V. Leaune
Y. Tousignant
J. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Centre for AIDS Studies, Public Health Unit, Montreal General Hospital, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1994;42(1):50-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - psychology - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Sexual Partners
Abstract
The objectives of the study were to determine knowledge levels regarding AIDS and its modes of transmission, and to describe sexual behaviour of Montrealers of Haitian origin. A serial cross-sectional study was conducted in three phases between 1987 and 1990. A questionnaire was administered in a face-to-face interview with the exception of the section concerning sexual practices which was self-administered for those respondents who were literate in French. The study was conducted among 775 men and women residing in the metropolitan Montreal region. These individuals were aged 15 to 39, were born in Haiti or had at least one parent born in Haiti. Knowledge levels were high except for misconceptions about HIV transmission through casual contact and mosquito bites. There was a significant association between high risk sexual behaviour and marital status with the odds of having had multiple partners significantly raised for previously married individuals (OR = 5.96, 95% CI = 3.09; 11.50). High risk behaviour was also associated with being under 25 years of age (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.40; 5.74), knowing someone with HIV/AIDS (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.05; 3.37), being male (OR = 6.81, 95% CI = 3.99; 11.60) and earlier year of interview. Montrealers of Haitian origin, with their specific AIDS-related socio-cultural characteristics, constitute a community which is intermediate between their country of origin, Haiti, and their host country, Canada.
PubMed ID
8134666 View in PubMed
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523 records – page 1 of 53.