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Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of actuarial procedures for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk may vary across ethnicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30268
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):107-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Niklas Långström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 23000, S-104 35 Stockholm, Sweden. niklas.langstrom@cns.ki.se
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):107-20
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Analysis of Variance
Asia - ethnology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence - prevention & control
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about whether the accuracy of tools for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk holds across ethnic minority offenders. I investigated the predictive validity across ethnicity for the RRASOR and the Static-99 actuarial risk assessment procedures in a national cohort of all adult male sex offenders released from prison in Sweden 1993-1997. Subjects ordered out of Sweden upon release from prison were excluded and remaining subjects (N = 1303) divided into three subgroups based on citizenship. Eighty-three percent of the subjects were of Nordic ethnicity, and non-Nordic citizens were either of non-Nordic European (n = 49, hereafter called European) or African Asian descent (n = 128). The two tools were equally accurate among Nordic and European sexual offenders for the prediction of any sexual and any violent nonsexual recidivism. In contrast, neither measure could differentiate African Asian sexual or violent recidivists from nonrecidivists. Compared to European offenders, AfricanAsian offenders had more often sexually victimized a nonrelative or stranger, had higher Static-99 scores, were younger, more often single, and more often homeless. The results require replication, but suggest that the promising predictive validity seen with some risk assessment tools may not generalize across offender ethnicity or migration status. More speculatively, different risk factors or causal chains might be involved in the development or persistence of offending among minority or immigrant sexual abusers.
PubMed ID
15208896 View in PubMed
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Age of first sexual intercourse and acculturation: effects on adult sexual responding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159354
Source
J Sex Med. 2008 Mar;5(3):571-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Jane S T Woo
Lori A Brotto
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia-Psychology, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Sex Med. 2008 Mar;5(3):571-82
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Age Factors
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - ethnology
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological - ethnology
Social Values
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although age of first intercourse and the emotional aspects of that experience are often a target in assessment because they are thought to contribute to later sexual functioning, research to date on how sexual debut relates to adult sexual functioning has been limited and contradictory.
The goal of this study was to explore the association between age of first intercourse and adult sexual function in a sample of Euro-Canadian and Asian Canadian university students. In addition, culture-based comparisons of sexual complaints were made to clarify the role of culture in sexual response.
Euro-Canadian (N = 299) and Asian Canadian (N = 329) university students completed the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction and the Vancouver Index of Acculturation.
Self-reported sexual problems and bidimensional acculturation.
Ethnic group comparisons revealed that Asians reported more sexual complaints including sexual avoidance, dissatisfaction and non-sensuality. Among the women, Asians reported higher scores on the Vaginismus and Anorgasmia subscales whereas the ethnic groups did not differ on the male-specific measures of sexual complaints. In the overall sample, older age of first intercourse was associated with more sexual problems as an adult, including more sexual infrequency, sexual avoidance, and non-sensuality. Among the Asian Canadians, less identification with Western culture was predictive of more sexual complaints overall, more sexual noncommunication, more sexual avoidance, and more non-sensuality. For Asian women, acculturation interacted with age of first intercourse to predict Vaginismus scores.
Overall, these data replicate prior research that found that a university sample of individuals of Asian descent have higher rates of sexual problems and that this effect can be explained by acculturation. Earlier sexual debut was associated with fewer sexual complaints in adulthood.
PubMed ID
18194176 View in PubMed
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Aids-related knowledge and practices in migrant populations: the case of Montrealers of Haitian origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219237
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1994;42(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Adrien
J F Boivin
C. Hankins
V. Leaune
Y. Tousignant
J. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Centre for AIDS Studies, Public Health Unit, Montreal General Hospital, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1994;42(1):50-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - psychology - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Sexual Partners
Abstract
The objectives of the study were to determine knowledge levels regarding AIDS and its modes of transmission, and to describe sexual behaviour of Montrealers of Haitian origin. A serial cross-sectional study was conducted in three phases between 1987 and 1990. A questionnaire was administered in a face-to-face interview with the exception of the section concerning sexual practices which was self-administered for those respondents who were literate in French. The study was conducted among 775 men and women residing in the metropolitan Montreal region. These individuals were aged 15 to 39, were born in Haiti or had at least one parent born in Haiti. Knowledge levels were high except for misconceptions about HIV transmission through casual contact and mosquito bites. There was a significant association between high risk sexual behaviour and marital status with the odds of having had multiple partners significantly raised for previously married individuals (OR = 5.96, 95% CI = 3.09; 11.50). High risk behaviour was also associated with being under 25 years of age (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.40; 5.74), knowing someone with HIV/AIDS (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.05; 3.37), being male (OR = 6.81, 95% CI = 3.99; 11.60) and earlier year of interview. Montrealers of Haitian origin, with their specific AIDS-related socio-cultural characteristics, constitute a community which is intermediate between their country of origin, Haiti, and their host country, Canada.
PubMed ID
8134666 View in PubMed
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American Indian--Alaska Native youth health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3576
Source
JAMA. 1992 Mar 25;267(12):1637-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1992
Author
R W Blum
B. Harmon
L. Harris
L. Bergeisen
M D Resnick
Author Affiliation
Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, University of Minnesota, Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
JAMA. 1992 Mar 25;267(12):1637-44
Date
Mar-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Child Abuse - ethnology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Smoking - ethnology
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Suicide, Attempted - ethnology
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To assess risk behaviors, health problems, worries and concerns, and resiliency-promoting factors among American Indian-Alaska Native adolescents. DESIGN--Survey. SETTING--Nonurban schools from eight Indian Health Service areas. PARTICIPANTS--A total of 13,454 seventh- through 12th-grade American Indian-Alaska Native youths. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--revised version of the Adolescent Health Survey, a comprehensive, anonymous, self-report questionnaire with 162 items addressing 10 dimensions of health. RESULTS--Poor physical health was reported by 2% of the study sample and was significantly correlated with social risk factors of physical and/or sexual abuse, suicide attempts, substance abuse, poor school performance, and nutritional inadequacies. Injury risk behaviors included never wearing seatbelts (44%), drinking and driving (37.9% of driving 10th through 12th graders), and riding with a driver who had been drinking (21.8%). Physical and sexual abuse prevalence was 10% and 13%, respectively, with 23.9% of females reporting physical abuse and 21.6% of females reporting sexual abuse by the 12th grade. Almost 6% of the entire sample endorsed signs of severe emotional distress. Eleven percent of the teens surveyed knew someone who had killed himself or herself, and 17% had attempted suicide themselves. Sixty-five percent of males and 56.8% of females reported having had intercourse by the 12th grade. Weekly or more frequent alcohol use rose from 8.2% of seventh graders to 14.1% by the 12th grade; for males, the survey noted an increase in regular alcohol use of 3% to 5% a year to 27.3% by the 12th grade. For each variable measured, rates are much higher for American Indian adolescents than those for rural white Minnesota youth, except for age at first intercourse and alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS--American Indian-Alaska Native adolescents reported high rates of health-compromising behaviors and risk factors related to unintentional injury, substance use, poor self-assessed health status, emotional distress, and suicide. Interventions must be culturally sensitive, acknowledge the heterogeneity of Indian populations, be grounded in cultural traditions that promote health, and be developed with full participation of the involved communities.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1992 Aug 19;268(7):8741640612
PubMed ID
1542173 View in PubMed
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BeLieving in Native Girls: characteristics from a baseline assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124562
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):15-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Deborah Scott
Aleisha Langhorne
Author Affiliation
Sage Associates, Inc., Houston, TX 77007, USA. dsscott@sageways.com
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):15-36
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Alaska
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Homeless Youth - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American
Juvenile Delinquency - ethnology - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BeLieving In Native Girls (BLING) is a juvenile delinquency and HIV intervention at a residential boarding school for American Indian/Alaska Native adolescent girls ages 12-20 years. In 2010, 115 participants completed baseline surveys to identify risk and protective factors. Initial findings are discussed regarding a variety of topics, including demographics and general characteristics, academic engagement, home neighborhood characteristics and safety, experience with and perceptions of gang involvement, problem-solving skills, self-esteem, depression, sexual experiences and risk-taking behaviors, substance abuse, and dating violence.
PubMed ID
22569723 View in PubMed
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Canadian Aboriginal people's experiences with HIV/AIDS as portrayed in selected English language Aboriginal media (1996-2000).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175886
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Juanne N Clarke
Daniela B Friedman
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology; Anthropology, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3C5. jclarke@wlu.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Bibliometrics
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Newspapers
Public Opinion
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Spirituality
Stereotyping
Abstract
This paper describes the portrayal of HIV/AIDS in 14 mass print newspapers directed towards the Canadian Aboriginal population and published between 1996 and 2000. Based on qualitative content analysis the research examines both manifest and latent meanings. Manifest results of this study indicate that women and youth are under represented as persons with HIV/AIDS. The latent results note the frequent references to Aboriginal culture, and the political and economic position of Aboriginal Canadians when discussing the disease, the person with the disease, the fear of the disease and the reaction of the community to the person with the disease. Unlike mainstream media where the medical frame is dominant, HIV/AIDS are here contextualized by culture, identity, spirituality and political-economic issues.
PubMed ID
15748666 View in PubMed
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Community-based, culturally sensitive HIV/AIDS education for Aboriginal adolescents: implications for nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181598
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jan;15(1):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Basanti B Majumdar
Tracey L Chambers
Jacqueline Roberts
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit (SLRU), Community-Linked Evaluation AIDS Resource Unit (CLEAR), McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jan;15(1):69-73
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Educational Measurement
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Safe Sex - ethnology
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
Research is an essential component of effective, evidence-based nursing practice. Limited scientific data have been published on Canadian Aboriginals, and even less information is available on HIV prevention efforts aimed at Aboriginal youth. The need for more research on HIV and AIDS among Aboriginals, and especially Aboriginal youth, is highlighted throughout the article as a means to improving prevention interventions for this vulnerable population. At the same time, insights gained from a culture-sensitive, HIV/AIDS educational program that targeted a group of Aboriginal adolescents from a local First Nations community in Ontario are discussed. Implications for future HIV/AIDS peer-based prevention efforts using the train-the-trainer technique are also considered.
PubMed ID
14768418 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.