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1522 records – page 1 of 153.

[1 years admission of young drug abusers in the psychiatric clinic of Greater Copenhagen--preliminary report].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109354
Source
Nord Med. 1970 Oct 29;83(44):1412-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-1970

The 2002 Canadian Contraception Study: Part 2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179234
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jul;26(7):646-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
William Fisher
Richard Boroditsky
Brian Morris
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jul;26(7):646-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Contraception
Contraception Behavior - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The 2002 Canadian Contraception Study investigated the contraception and sexual health-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices of a representative sample of Canadian women of childbearing age. In Part 2 of the report of this research, the authors focus on the contraceptive attitudes and practices of adolescent women and women in their later reproductive years, provide data on sexual and reproductive health indicators of Canadian women, describe 2-decade trends in the awareness, opinion, and utilization of contraceptive methods among Canadian women, and describe contraception counselling strategies that may be used to improve patient choice and adherence to method. This report closes with an overall discussion of the findings of the 2002 Canadian Contraception Study.
PubMed ID
15248934 View in PubMed
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Abnormal Papanicolaou smear. A population-based study of risk factors in Greenlandic and Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25362
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S K Kjaer
P. Poll
H. Jensen
G. Engholm
B J Haugaard
C. Teisen
R B Christensen
K A Möller
B F Vestergaard
E M de Villiers
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Contraception Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Greenland
Herpes Genitalis - complications
Humans
Papillomavirus
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Smoking
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - diagnosis - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Possible risk factors for abnormal Papanicolaou smear were investigated in a population-based cross-sectional study. From Nuuk (Greenland) and Nykøbing Falster (Denmark), random samples of 800 women aged 20-39 years were drawn. Totals of 586 and 661 women were included in Greenland and Denmark, respectively. All women went through a personal interview, and had a gynecologic examination including a PAP smear and cervical swab for HPV analysis. A blood sample was taken for analysis of HSV type specific antibodies. Multiple sexual partners was the most important risk factor for abnormal cervical cytology (OR = 4.2). An infectious etiology was also indirectly supported by a relatively protective effect of barrier contraceptive methods (OR = 0.6). The simultaneous finding of HPV 16/18 as a significant risk factor (OR = 2.4) cannot be taken uncritically as support for a causal effect of this HPV type, since such a relationship between cytological changes of the cervix and HPV infection could also emerge if the positive PAP smear was not just a measure of intra-epithelial neoplasia but also an expression of the infection itself on the cervix.
PubMed ID
2161172 View in PubMed
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Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
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Academic performance and mental health in university students. A two-year follow-up study of a sample of first-year students at the University of Uppsala 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66502
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1973;239:7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

Access to primary health care among homeless adults in Toronto, Canada: results from the Street Health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131318
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Erika Khandor
Kate Mason
Catharine Chambers
Kate Rossiter
Laura Cowan
Stephen W Hwang
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Communication Barriers
Cost of Illness
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite experiencing a disproportionate burden of acute and chronic health issues, many homeless people face barriers to primary health care. Most studies on health care access among homeless populations have been conducted in the United States, and relatively few are available from countries such as Canada that have a system of universal health insurance. We investigated access to primary health care among a representative sample of homeless adults in Toronto, Canada.
Homeless adults were recruited from shelter and meal programs in downtown Toronto between November 2006 and February 2007. Cross-sectional data were collected on demographic characteristics, health status, health determinants and access to health care. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between having a family doctor as the usual source of health care (an indicator of access to primary care) and health status, proof of health insurance, and substance use after adjustment for demographic characteristics.
Of the 366 participants included in our study, 156 (43%) reported having a family doctor. After adjustment for potential confounders and covariates, we found that the odds of having a family doctor significantly decreased with every additional year spent homeless in the participant's lifetime (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86-0.97). Having a family doctor was significantly associated with being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered (adjusted OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.04-7.00), having a health card (proof of health insurance coverage in the province of Ontario) (adjusted OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.61-4.89) and having a chronic medical condition (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.03-3.53).
Less than half of the homeless people in Toronto who participated in our study reported having a family doctor. Not having a family doctor was associated with key indicators of health care access and health status, including increasing duration of homelessness, lack of proof of health insurance coverage and having a chronic medical condition. Increased efforts are needed to address the barriers to appropriate health care and good health that persist in this population despite the provision of health insurance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21915240 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
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1522 records – page 1 of 153.