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[Abortion rate among students are increasing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170849
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(21):2253-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Elise Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Tampereen yliopiston lääketieteen laitos. elise.kosunen@uta.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(21):2253-4
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Contraception - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Sex Education - organization & administration
Notes
Comment In: Duodecim. 2006;122(1):104; author reply 10416509197
PubMed ID
16457103 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138796
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
  1 document  
Author
Venla Lehti
Andre Sourander
Anat Klomek
Solja Niemelä
Lauri Sillanmäki
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Itäinen Pitkäkatu 1 / Varia, 20014, Turku, Finland. venla.lehti@utu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
240491
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth rate
Bullying - psychology
Child
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - psychology
Research Report
Risk factors
Sex Education - organization & administration
Social Support
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study is to examine the association between bullying behaviour at the age of 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20. This birth cohort study included 2,867 Finnish girls at baseline in 1989. Register-based follow-up data on births was collected until the end of 2001. Information, both on the main exposure and outcome, was available for 2,507 girls. Both bullies and victims had an increased risk of becoming a teenage mother independent of family-related risk factors. When controlled for childhood psychopathology, however, the association remained significant for bullies (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) and bully-victims (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.05-3.2), but not for pure victims. Reports of bullying and victimisation from the girls themselves, their parents and their teachers were all associated with becoming a teenage mother independent of each other. There is a predictive association between being a bully in childhood and becoming a mother in adolescence. It may be useful to target bullies for teenage pregnancy prevention.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2011 Aug;14(3):6421764863
PubMed ID
21136277 View in PubMed
Documents

PEER_stage2_10.1007_s00787-010-0147-z.pdf

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Community-based, culturally sensitive HIV/AIDS education for Aboriginal adolescents: implications for nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181598
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jan;15(1):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Basanti B Majumdar
Tracey L Chambers
Jacqueline Roberts
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit (SLRU), Community-Linked Evaluation AIDS Resource Unit (CLEAR), McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jan;15(1):69-73
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Educational Measurement
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Safe Sex - ethnology
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
Research is an essential component of effective, evidence-based nursing practice. Limited scientific data have been published on Canadian Aboriginals, and even less information is available on HIV prevention efforts aimed at Aboriginal youth. The need for more research on HIV and AIDS among Aboriginals, and especially Aboriginal youth, is highlighted throughout the article as a means to improving prevention interventions for this vulnerable population. At the same time, insights gained from a culture-sensitive, HIV/AIDS educational program that targeted a group of Aboriginal adolescents from a local First Nations community in Ontario are discussed. Implications for future HIV/AIDS peer-based prevention efforts using the train-the-trainer technique are also considered.
PubMed ID
14768418 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of HIV prevention in Ontario, Canada: a multilevel comparison of bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179423
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Chad A Leaver
Dan Allman
Ted Meyers
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1181-5
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bisexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Data Collection - methods
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Men - education - psychology
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario - epidemiology
Program Evaluation
Public Health Practice
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Safe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Partners
Abstract
We examined the effectiveness of community-level HIV prevention programming for men who have sex with men.
We used multilevel methods to examine unprotected intercourse by bisexual men (n = 1016) with male and female partners in geographic regions with and without HIV prevention programming.
Men living in geographic regions with HIV prevention programming had significantly less frequent unprotected homosexual intercourse with both casual and regular partners. In contrast, no differences were observed for unprotected heterosexual intercourse.
This study provides evidence supporting the effectiveness of community-level HIV prevention programming and the need for its broader implementation. The study also demonstrates the suitability of multilevel methods for examining the effectiveness of community-level public health programs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15226140 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a social network HIV prevention intervention program for young men who have sex with men in Russia and Bulgaria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184449
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 2003 Jun;15(3):205-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Yuri A Amirkhanian
Jeffrey A Kelly
Elena Kabakchieva
Timothy L McAuliffe
Sylvia Vassileva
Author Affiliation
Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2017 N Summit Avenue, Milwaukee 53202, USA. yuri@mcw.edu
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 2003 Jun;15(3):205-20
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulgaria
Condoms - utilization
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Planning - methods
Homosexuality, Male - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leadership
Male
Program Evaluation
Risk Reduction Behavior
Russia
Safe Sex - statistics & numerical data
Sex Education - organization & administration
Social Support
Sociometric Techniques
Abstract
HIV prevention, by intervening within social networks, is potentially important but highly understudied. Approaches that systematically identify, train, and enlist known social influence leaders to advise members of their own networks in risk reduction constitute ways to reach hidden population segments, persons who are distrustful of authorities but trust their peers, and those who cannot be reached through traditional professionally delivered counseling. This article illustrates and provides evaluation data on a program that recruited 14 intact social networks of young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Sofia, Bulgaria. Sociometric measures were used to identify the social leader of each network, and baseline risk assessment measures were administered to all members of each social network. The sociometrically determined leaders then attended a six-session group program that provided training and guidance in how to carry out theory-based and tailored HIV prevention conversations with members of their own social networks. Four months after leaders completed the program, all network members were readministered risk assessment measures. Pre- to postintervention data revealed that the program produced: (1) increases in the level and comfort with which network members talked about AIDS prevention topics in their daily conversations; (2) increased network-level AIDS risk reduction knowledge and improved risk reduction norm perceptions, attitudes, behavioral intentions, and self-efficacy; and (3) increased condom use levels among network members. Although not a controlled, randomized trial, these program evaluation findings strongly support the feasibility of social network-level HIV prevention approaches.
PubMed ID
12866833 View in PubMed
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Health professionals' views on sexual information following MI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100396
Source
Br J Nurs. 2010 Sep 9-22;19(16):1052-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bodil Ivarsson
Bengt Fridlund
Trygve Sjöberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoacic Surgery, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nurs. 2010 Sep 9-22;19(16):1052-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coronary Care Units
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior
Sweden
Teaching Materials
Abstract
Following myocardial infarction (MI), patients often have unanswered questions about resuming sexual activity. Coronary care nurses can play an important role in counselling. However, this sensitive area is frequently neglected in nursing practice. This article discusses patient and nurse perceptions of such discussions and explores ways to increase nurses' awareness, so that they might offer sexual counselling to patients post-MI. Health professionals representing 18 Swedish coronary care units answered two open-ended questions, and their answers were analysed and categorized by content. Two main categories were identified: 'Difficulties and challenges' and 'Future needs'. These two categories were further divided into sub-categories respectively: 'Information flow', 'Patients' responsibility', 'Information to partners' and 'Cooperating with other experts'; and 'Preparing information tools' and 'Highlighting sexual issues'. It was found that when sexual concerns arise, contact with medical social workers, urologists and gynaecologists is scarce. It was also found that the current written information is insufficient. Responsibility currently falls on patients to ensure that both they and their partners have been adequately informed regarding any sexual concerns. It is essential that health professionals are well-educated and have the necessary skills to inform patients and their partners about sexual issues following MI.
PubMed ID
20852469 View in PubMed
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Substance use and sexual risk behaviors among american Indian and alaska native high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105766
Source
J Sch Health. 2014 Jan;84(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Lori de Ravello
Sherry Everett Jones
Scott Tulloch
Melanie Taylor
Sonal Doshi
Author Affiliation
Public Health Advisor, (leb8@cdc.gov), Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, MS F-74, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717.
Source
J Sch Health. 2014 Jan;84(1):25-32
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Students - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Abstract
We describe the prevalence of behaviors that put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) high school students at risk for teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the relationships among race/ethnicity and these behaviors.
We analyzed merged 2007 and 2009 data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a biennial, self-administered, school-based survey of US students in grades 9-12 (N = 27,912). Prevalence estimates and logistic regression, controlling for sex and grade, were used to examine the associations between race/ethnicity, and substance use, and sexual risk behaviors.
Of the 26 variables studied, the adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were higher among AI/AN than White students for 18 variables (ranging from 1.4 to 2.3), higher among AI/AN than Black students for 13 variables (ranging from 1.4 to 4.2), and higher among AI/AN than Hispanic students for 5 variables (ranging from 1.4 to 1.5). Odds were lower among AI/AN than Black students for many of the sexual risk-related behaviors.
The data suggest it is necessary to develop targeted, adolescent-specific interventions aimed at reducing behaviors that put AI/AN high school students at risk for teen pregnancy, STI/HIV, and other health conditions.
PubMed ID
24320149 View in PubMed
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Teen sexuality. Reaching out in the malls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190783
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):47-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheila J Evans
Bonnie L Wright
Lauren Goodbrand
Jeff P Kilbreath
Jennifer Young
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario. evans@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):47-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adult
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Family Planning Services
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
Urban Population
Abstract
Existing sexual health programs have not significantly reduced teen pregnancies or sexually transmitted diseases. A more creative approach is needed.
An assessment of 539 teens in one Ontario city was conducted to identify knowledge about and use of birth control, comfort in discussing sexual health, and preferred sites, providers and methods of service delivery.
Knowledge of, and comfort discussing, birth control was not associated with frequency of use but was associated with grade. Adolescents were less comfortable discussing sexual health with teachers than health professionals. Over time, comfort increased with health professionals, but not teachers. Sexually active teens reported willingness to attend mall-based clinics.
Using birth control appears to be maturational given its association with grade. Since teens were consistently less comfortable with teachers, providing sexual health services in schools is likely ineffective. Teens may respond to clinics in creative settings such as malls.
PubMed ID
11925700 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.