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2D:4D finger length ratio in the Chuvashian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114154
Source
Homo. 2013 Jun;64(3):233-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
L. Kalichman
D. Zorina
V. Batsevich
E. Kobyliansky
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel. kleonid@bgu.ac.il
Source
Homo. 2013 Jun;64(3):233-40
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anthropometry
Female
Finger Phalanges - anatomy & histology
Fingers - anatomy & histology
Humans
Male
Metacarpal Bones - anatomy & histology
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Russia
Sex Characteristics
Young Adult
Abstract
In a sample of Chuvashians (803 males and 738 females) we evaluated the mean values of index finger to ring finger (2D:4D) ratio, the contributions of phalanges and metacarpals to the 2D:4D ratio, and the symmetry between right and left 2D:4D ratios. Age, sex, anthropometric data and radiographs of both hands were collected. Each hand was visually classified on a radiograph as either Type 1 - index finger was longer than ring finger; Type 2 - equal; or Type 3 - index shorter than the ring finger. The following measurements (1) from the mid-point of the base of the proximal phalanx to the mid-point of the tip of the distal phalanx; and (2) from the mid-point of the base to the mid-point of the tip of the metacarpal were obtained from the index and ring fingers. Visual classification was significantly associated with the measured 2D:4D length ratio. Women had a higher prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2, but lower prevalence of Type 3 ratio in both hands. Men had smaller measured 2D:4D phalangeal, metacarpal and ray (combined) ratios than women. Symmetry between the right and left hand measured 2D:4D ratios were significant in phalangeal (r=0.657, p
PubMed ID
23642797 View in PubMed
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The 6-min walk test: responses in healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130789
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Kylie Hill
Lisa M Wickerson
Lynda J Woon
Afshin Heidar Abady
Tom J Overend
Roger S Goldstein
Dina Brooks
Author Affiliation
Department of Respirology, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Exercise Test
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Respiratory Rate
Sex Characteristics
Tidal Volume
Time Factors
Walking
Abstract
We sought to describe responses to the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in healthy Canadian adults in order to facilitate interpretation of its results in patient populations. Seventy-seven healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years (65 ± 11 years, 40 females) completed this study. During a single visit, three 6MWTs were undertaken. The main outcome measure was 6-min walk distance (6MWD). Age, gender, height, and weight were recorded. In 61 (79%) participants, cardiorespiratory variables were collected during the third 6MWT using a calibrated portable gas analysis system. The 6MWD increased between the first and second test (615 ± 96 to 639 ± 98 m; p
PubMed ID
21967531 View in PubMed
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A 26-year follow-up study of heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood and adult disadvantage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115198
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Noora Berg
Olli Kiviruusu
Sakari Karvonen
Laura Kestilä
Tomi Lintonen
Ossi Rahkonen
Taina Huurre
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. noora.berg@thl.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify heavy drinking trajectories from age 16 to 42 years and to examine their associations with health, social, employment and economic disadvantage in mid-adulthood.
Finnish cohort study's participants who were 16 years old in 1983 were followed up at age 22, 32 and 42 (n = 1334). Heavy drinking was assessed at every study phase and based on these measurements trajectories of heavy drinking were identified. The trajectory groups were then examined as predictors of disadvantage at age 42.
Five distinct heavy drinking trajectories were identified: moderate (35%), steady low (22%), decreasing (9%), increasing (11%) and steady high (23%). Frequencies of the trajectory groups differed by gender. Using the moderate trajectory as a reference category, women in the steady high trajectory had an increased risk of experiencing almost all disadvantages at age 42. In men, increasing and steady high groups had an increased risk for experiencing health and economic disadvantage.
Steady high female drinkers and steady high and increasing male drinkers had the highest risk for disadvantage in mid-adulthood. By identifying heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood we can better predict long-term consequences of heavy alcohol use and plan prevention and intervention programmes.
PubMed ID
23531717 View in PubMed
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Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue cellularity in men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294588
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2017 10; 41(10):1564-1569
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
D P Andersson
E Arner
D E Hogling
M Rydén
P Arner
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2017 10; 41(10):1564-1569
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipocytes - cytology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Characteristics
Subcutaneous Fat, Abdominal - cytology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Differences in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) fat cell size and number (cellularity) are linked to insulin resistance. Men are generally more insulin resistant than women but it is unknown whether there is a gender dimorphism in SAT cellularity. The objective was to determine SAT cellularity and its relationship to insulin sensitivity in men and women.
In a cohort study performed at an outpatient academic clinic in Sweden, 798 women and 306 men were included. Estimated SAT mass (ESAT) was derived from measures of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and a formula. SAT biopsies were obtained to measure mean fat cell size; SAT adipocyte number was obtained by dividing ESAT with mean fat cell weight. Fat cell size was also compared with level of insulin sensitivity in vivo.
Over the entire range of body mass index (BMI) both fat cell size and number correlated positively with ESAT in either sex. On average, fat cell size was larger in men than in women, which was driven by significantly larger fat cells in non-obese men compared with non-obese women; no gender effect on fat cell size was seen in obese subjects. For all subjects fat cell number was larger in women than men, which was driven by a gender effect among non-obese individuals (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28630459 View in PubMed
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Academic performance of opposite-sex and same-sex twins in adolescence: A Danish national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265765
Source
Horm Behav. 2015 Mar;69:123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Linda Ahrenfeldt
Inge Petersen
Wendy Johnson
Kaare Christensen
Source
Horm Behav. 2015 Mar;69:123-31
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Androgens - blood
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Measurement - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Perception - physiology
Psychology, Adolescent
Sex Characteristics
Testosterone - blood
Twins - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Testosterone is an important hormone in the sexual differentiation of the brain, contributing to differences in cognitive abilities between males and females. For instance, studies in clinical populations such as females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) who are exposed to high levels of androgens in utero support arguments for prenatal testosterone effects on characteristics such as visuospatial cognition and behaviour. The comparison of opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) twin pairs can be used to help establish the role of prenatal testosterone. However, although some twin studies confirm a masculinizing effect of a male co-twin regarding for instance perception and cognition it remains unclear whether intra-uterine hormone transfer exists in humans. Our aim was to test the potential influences of testosterone on academic performance in OS twins. We compared ninth-grade test scores and teacher ratings of OS (n=1812) and SS (n=4054) twins as well as of twins and singletons (n=13,900) in mathematics, physics/chemistry, Danish, and English. We found that males had significantly higher test scores in mathematics than females (.06-.15 SD), whereas females performed better in Danish (.33-.49 SD), English (.20 SD), and neatness (.45-.64 SD). However, we did not find that OS females performed better in mathematics than SS and singleton females, nor did they perform worse either in Danish or English. Scores for OS and SS males were similar in all topics. In conclusion, this study did not provide evidence for a masculinization of female twins with male co-twins with regard to academic performance in adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25655669 View in PubMed
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[Acceleration of development, intragroup distribution and state of health of the school-chidren in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252911
Source
Pediatriia. 1974 Dec;(12):50-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1974

[Accounting for sexual dimorphism in neonatology]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58810
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Sep;(6):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
T M Klymenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Sep;(6):73-5
Date
Sep-1999
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Central Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Fetal Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fetus - physiopathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neurosecretory Systems - embryology - physiopathology
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Results are submitted of the study into the role of sex features of reactivity and adaptivity in the organization and compensation of structural and functional changes in the central nervous system in newborn babies having suffered intrauterine hypoxia and born in asphyxia. The identified sex dimorphism of the neuroendocrine system attests to the need for taking account of sex resistance in neonatology and permits the awareness of better adaptation of newborn girls with cerebral disorders of hypoxic genesis. Further study of sex dimorphism will, we believe, help in working out informative-and-quest systems of clinical, instrumental, biochemical, and morphological diagnosis in neonatology.
PubMed ID
10626449 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of health disorders as a systemic measure of aging: Findings from the NLTCS data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80645
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2006 Nov;127(11):840-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Kulminski Alexander
Yashin Anatoli
Ukraintseva Svetlana
Akushevich Igor
Arbeev Konstantin
Land Kenneth
Manton Kenneth
Author Affiliation
Center for Demographic Studies, Duke University, 2117 Campus Drive, Box 90408, Durham, NC 27708, USA. Alexander.Kulminski@duke.edu
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2006 Nov;127(11):840-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Disease
Epidemiology
Female
Humans
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An index of age-associated health/well-being disorders (deficits), called the "frailty index" (FI), appears to be a promising characteristic to capture dynamic variability in aging manifestations among age-peers. In this study we provide further support toward this view focusing on the analysis of the FI age patterns in the participants of the National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS). METHODS: The NLTCS assessed health and functioning of the U.S. elderly in 1982, 1984, 1989, 1994, and 1999. Detailed information for our sample was assessed from about 26,700 interviews. The individual FI is defined as a proportion of health deficits for a given person. RESULTS: The FI in the NLTCS exhibits accelerated age patterns. The acceleration is larger for elderly who, at younger ages, had a lower FI (low FI group) than for those who showed a higher FI at younger ages (high FI group). Age-patterns for low and high FI groups tend to converge at advanced ages. The rate of deficit accumulation is sex-sensitive. CONCLUSIONS: The accelerated FI age patterns suggest that FI can be considered as a systemic measure of aging process. Convergence of the (sex-specific) FI age patterns for low and high FI groups by extreme ages might reflect the limit of the FI-specific (or systemic) age as well as the limit of adaptation capacity in aging individuals.
PubMed ID
16978683 View in PubMed
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[A course in gynecology makes the gender perspective more obvious]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52596
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 17;96(7):753-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-1999
Author
E. Hultcrantz
C. Muhr
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för öron-, näs- och halssjukdomar, Uppsala universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 17;96(7):753-6
Date
Feb-17-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Sweden
Women's health
PubMed ID
10087780 View in PubMed
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Activated and total coagulation factor VII, and fibrinogen in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54392
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Danielsen
P T Onundarson
H. Thors
B. Vidarsson
J H Morrissey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspítalinn, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - metabolism
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - metabolism - surgery
Coronary Thrombosis - metabolism
Disease Progression
Factor VII - biosynthesis
Factor VIIa - biosynthesis
Female
Fibrinogen - biosynthesis
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen (FBG) and total coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) concentrations are higher in those patients with coronary artery disease who are at increased future risk of acute ischemic events. The relationship between activated factor VII (FVIIa) and cardiovascular events, however, has not been intensively studied. Data were collected from 401 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Conventional risk factors FVIIc, FVIIa and FBG were assessed in relation to the severity of coronary artery disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, and previous clinical events. A strong positive correlation was found between FVIIa and FVIIc (p
PubMed ID
9636964 View in PubMed
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966 records – page 1 of 97.