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5469 records – page 1 of 547.

Source
Neurology. 1989 Nov;39(11):1556-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
L M Brass
W N Kernan
Source
Neurology. 1989 Nov;39(11):1556-8
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - physiopathology
Consciousness
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
PubMed ID
2812344 View in PubMed
Less detail

Housing for people with serious mental illness: A comparison of values and research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162847
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2007 Sep;40(1-2):125-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Sylvestre, J
Nelson, G
Sabloff, A
Peddle, S
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, 125 University Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada. jsylvest@uottawa.ca
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2007 Sep;40(1-2):125-37
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Housing
Humans
Mental disorders
Ontario
Research
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This article contrasts values associated with the delivery of housing programs for people with serious mental illness with the typical topics pertaining to housing that are studied by researchers. Six values were identified through a search and content analysis of the literature on housing for people with serious mental illness. A second review of the literature was conducted to identify research on housing for this population. A comparison of findings from the two reviews suggested that whereas values concerned with the therapeutic benefits of housing had received considerable research attention, those concerned with a citizenship dimension had received relatively little. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the delivery of housing services and for housing research.
PubMed ID
17587174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case mix management--management tool of the future?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238135
Source
Can Nurse. 1985 Nov;81(10):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
M. Hodgson
C. Ormerod
Source
Can Nurse. 1985 Nov;81(10):17-20
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Hospital Administration
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
PubMed ID
3935308 View in PubMed
Less detail

Entering a world with no future: a phenomenological study describing the embodied experience of time when living with severe incurable disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123346
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):165-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Sidsel Ellingsen
Åsa Roxberg
Kjell Kristoffersen
Jan Henrik Rosland
Herdis Alvsvåg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Care, Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Bergen, Norway. sidsel.ellingsen@haraldsplass.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):165-74
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Humans
Norway
Palliative Care
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This article presents findings from a phenomenological study exploring experience of time by patients living close to death. The empirical data consist of 26 open-ended interviews from 23 patients living with severe incurable disease receiving palliative care in Norway. Three aspects of experience of time were revealed as prominent: (i) Entering a world with no future; living close to death alters perception of and relationship to time. (ii) Listening to the rhythm of my body, not looking at the clock; embodied with severe illness, it is the body not the clock that structures and controls the activities of the day. (iii). Receiving time, taking time; being offered - not asked for - help is like receiving time that confirms humanity, in contrast to having to ask for help which is like taking others time and thereby revealing own helplessness. Experience of time close to death is discussed as an embodied experience of inner, contextual, relational dimensions in harmony and disharmony with the rhythm of nature, environment and others. Rhythms in harmony provide relief, while rhythms in disharmony confer weakness and limit time.
PubMed ID
22708714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma in the emergency room in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145200
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nick R Anthonisen
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):13-4
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - therapy
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
Notes
Cites: Can Respir J. 2007 Sep;14(6):331-717885692
Cites: J Emerg Med. 1998 May-Jun;16(3):507-119610988
Cites: Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):25-3020186368
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2008 Aug;15(8):709-1718637082
Comment On: Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):25-3020186368
PubMed ID
20186366 View in PubMed
Less detail

[How to recognize burnout and treat it?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132966
Source
Duodecim. 2011;127(11):1139-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Arja Tuunainen
Akila Ritva
Kirsi Räisänen
Author Affiliation
Työterveyslaitos, Inhimillinen työ -osaamiskeskus, kognitiivinen toimintakyky ja työ -tiimi, Helsinki.
Source
Duodecim. 2011;127(11):1139-46
Date
2011
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burnout, Professional - diagnosis - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Differential
Finland
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Burnout is a common problem of psychic well-being associated with work also in Finland. Mild burnout of a strongly work-oriented person may cause temporary symptoms, from which recovery may take place rapidly. Severe burnout is mostly a condition of long duration, and the symptoms can vary in their degree of severity. In clinical practice it is important for a doctor to recognize burnout and be able to distinguish it from other causes yielding similar symptoms. Treatment of burnout involves measures to prevent and treat symptoms, in combination with rehabilitating procedures.
PubMed ID
21755805 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Surgical classification of the diabetic foot syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47149
Source
Klin Khir. 2004 Sep;(9):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
P O Herasymchuk
Source
Klin Khir. 2004 Sep;(9):37-9
Date
Sep-2004
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetic Foot - classification - surgery
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Severity of Illness Index
Syndrome
Abstract
Surgical classification of the diabetic foot syndrome was proposed, permitting to formulate pathogenetic diagnosis with working out in detail the foot pathologic process depth and expansion, taking into account the microflora presence in the purulent-necrotic affection zone, basing on own experience of treatment of 490 patients. This permits to formulate tactic and volume of necessary pathogenetic surgical and conservative treatment.
PubMed ID
15560600 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neuromotor profiles: what are they and what can we learn from them?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198198
Source
Brain Cogn. 2000 Jun-Aug;43(1-3):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Beuter
R. Edwards
D. Lamoureux
Author Affiliation
Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Quebec at Montreal.
Source
Brain Cogn. 2000 Jun-Aug;43(1-3):39-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Eye Movements - physiology
Humans
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis
Severity of Illness Index
Tremor - diagnosis
Abstract
Eye movements, alternating movements, rapid pointing movements, and various tremors were measured on patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 21), on Cree subjects exposed to methylmercury (n = 36), and on healthy control subjects (n = 30). Neuromotor profiles were created according to thirty characteristics extracted from test results of four subgroups matched for age and composed of six subjects each. Z scores were calculated with respect to the mean and standard deviation of the control group for each of the 30 characteristics. The subgroup with the lower methylmercury blood level had larger z scores than the control subgroup and with a few positive values above one standard deviation. The subgroup with the higher methylmercury blood level had several z scores above two standard deviations. Interestingly, the abnormal values for the subgroup with Parkinson's disease were mostly limited to static tremor recorded with no visual feedback and reached up to 5 standard deviations. These results indicate that neuromotor profiles can be used to summarize information extracted from different neuromotor tests and to differentiate neurological conditions.
PubMed ID
10857659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Kingston General reviews the use of CMGs as a management tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235407
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1987 Apr;64(3):24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
A L Boadway
M E Brown
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1987 Apr;64(3):24-6
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Hospitals, General
Humans
Patients - classification
Severity of Illness Index
PubMed ID
3111920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of climatic change in children with atopic eczema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80020
Source
Allergy. 2006 Dec;61(12):1403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Byremo G.
Rød G.
Carlsen K H
Author Affiliation
Voksentoppen, Department of Paediatrics, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2006 Dec;61(12):1403-10
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate
Dermatitis, Atopic - physiopathology
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Climate and sunlight (ultraviolet radiation) influence activity of atopic eczema. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of moving from a subarctic/temperate climate to a sunny subtropical climate on children's atopic eczema. METHODS: Children, 4-13 years, with severe atopic eczema were randomized to stay 4 weeks in Gran Canary (index patients = 30) and home in Norway (controls = 26), with a follow up of 3 months. SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) was primary variable, and secondary were Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI), Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization and pharmacological skin treatment. RESULTS: SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis decreased from 37.2 (29.4-44.9) to 12.2 (9.0-15.4) [mean (95% confidence intervals)] after 4 weeks and 21.2 (17.2-25.1) 3 months thereafter in index patients (P
PubMed ID
17073869 View in PubMed
Less detail

5469 records – page 1 of 547.