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Analysis of the blood of American black bears

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293108
Source
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 1966 Vol 19, 285-289
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966
Author
Hock, R.J
Author Affiliation
Northrop Space Lab Hawthorne CA
Source
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 1966 Vol 19, 285-289
Date
1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ursus americanus
Analysis
Blood
blood chemistry
blood plasma
blood serum proteins
Abstract
Blood was obtained from 4 captive black bears, Ursus americanus, 9 to 10 months of age. Values are reported for erythrocyte count, haematocrit, sp. gr., sedimentation rate, Hb value, plasma proteins and viscosity of blood and plasma.
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Commentaries -- Nutrition and metabolism

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94108
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Indians from six regions across In the country and 366 Eski111:>s from four major settlementsĀ· d . b erve , children and adolescents some weight deficits were 0 5 particularly among Esk:i.Joos. Protein intakes were not fullY adequate aioong all children, but serum protein levels ~ere
  1 document  
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aleuts
Diabetes mellitus
Direct photon absorptiometry
Disadaptive changes
Eskimos
Folate
Glucose tolerance
Indians
Iodine deficiency
Iron deficiency
Lactic Acid
Metabolic disease
Nganasans
Novosibirsk
Obesity
Phospholipids
Pribilof Islands
Pyruvic Acid
Rickets
Serum protein
Tlingits
Vitamin A
Notes
"Nutritional status of Indians and Eskimos as revealed by Nutrition Canada" (A.L. Forbes)
"Metabolic disease in arctic populations" (Edward M. Scott)
"Glucose tolerance among Aleuts on the Pribilof Islands" (S.E. Dippe, P.H. Bennett, D.W. Dippe, T. Humphry, J. Burks, and M. Miller)
"Biochemical mechanisms of human adaptation to the extreme factors of the north" (L. Panin)
"Bone mineral content of north Alaskan Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren Mather)
"Bone mineral content in Canadian Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren E. Mather)
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The effect of inositol and rapid rewarming upon acute cold injury in the rabbit. I. Electrophoretic studies of serum and edema fluid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297272
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-29.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
studies of serum protein distri- bution were performed; the two groups not treated with inositol, and the group treated with inositol alone, showed no significant changes in serum protein distribution subsequent to the experimental conditions. Serum protein distributions in the two groups which had
  1 document  
Author
Sullivan, Bernard J.
Fimian, Walter J.
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, Boston College, Massachusetts
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-29.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1088207
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rabbits
Serum protein
Edema
Inositol
Cold Temperature
Rewarming
Abstract
Rabbits were subjected to local acute cold injury by freezing one leg for ten minutes. The experiment was divided into five parts, with a separate group of rabbits being tested under each of the following series:
( 1) Cold injury and gradual rewarming, (2) Cold injury and rapid rewarming, (3) Inositol treatment, cold injury, and gradual rewarming, (4) Inositol treatment, cold injury, and rapid rewarming, (5) Inositol treatment alone.
Observations indicated that the two groups treated with inositol prior to cold injury developed less edema than the two comparable groups subjected to cold injury without inositol. Electrophoretic studies of serum protein distribution were performed; the two groups not treated with inositol, and the group treated with inositol alone, showed no significant changes in serum protein distribution subsequent to the experimental conditions. Serum protein distributions in the two groups which had received inositol prior to cold injury revealed a significant decrease in serum albumin in both groups, with an increase in either alpha, beta or gamma globulin. It is suggested that inositol may affect the capillary walls so that they are less permeable to alpha, beta and gamma globulins under the conditions of cold injury.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-29
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