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Analysis of electrocardiographic data following use of paroxetine in pediatric depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169881
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;45(4):422-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Stan Krulewicz
David J Carpenter
Regan Fong
Joseph P Horrigan
Alan Lipschitz
Philip Perera
Karen Dineen Wagner
Author Affiliation
GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA 19406-2772, USA. stan.krulewicz@gsk.com
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;45(4):422-30
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Humans
Male
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - drug therapy
Paroxetine - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
United States
Abstract
This retrospective analysis of electrocardiographic (ECG) data investigated the cardiovascular effects of paroxetine 10-50 mg/day in pediatric patients (7-18 years of age). Data were collected from three 8- to 10-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials of paroxetine in pediatric patients with major depressive disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were retrospectively retrieved from 63 study sites in the United States and Canada. Only patients with at least one screening and one on-treatment ECG were included. ECGs were analyzed for heart rate, QT interval corrected using Bazett's formula (QTcB) and Fridericia's formula (QTcF), at screening and while being treated. PR, R-R, and QRS intervals and the maximum change in QTcB and QTcF from screening to endpoint were determined. Clinically significant thresholds were defined a priori.
A total of 1,451 ECGs from 449 patients receiving placebo (n = 207), paroxetine (n = 200), or imipramine (n = 42) were analyzed. Treatment with paroxetine did not significantly increase QTcB or QTcF or any ECG parameters compared with placebo. Treatment with imipramine significantly increased heart rate and QTcB, R-R, and QRS intervals compared with either paroxetine or placebo.
Data from this retrospective study indicate that paroxetine (10-50 mg/day) is unlikely to be associated with significant ECG changes in medically healthy pediatric patients.
PubMed ID
16601647 View in PubMed
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An open study of the effectiveness of Internet treatment for panic disorder delivered in a psychiatric setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154399
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):44-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jan Bergström
Gerhard Andersson
Andreas Karlsson
Sergej Andréewitch
Christian Rück
Per Carlbring
Nils Lindefors
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Jan.O.Bergstrom@ki.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):44-50
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Self Care - psychology
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) is common and can be treated effectively with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication or cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). However, the lack of access to CBT services has motivated the development of self-help approaches requiring less therapist contact. A novel treatment modality in this field, showing efficacy in several randomized trials but until now not evaluated within the context of regular psychiatric care, is Internet-based treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Internet-based CBT for patients in a psychiatric setting. Twenty consecutively referred patients with PD were included in the study. A structured clinical interview with a psychiatrist was conducted for inclusion, as well as at post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. The treatment consisted of a 10-week CBT-based self-help programme, including minimal therapist support by e-mail. At post-treatment, 94% of patients no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PD (82% at 6-month follow-up). The within-group effect sizes (for the main outcome PDSS; Panic Disorder Severity Scale) were Cohen's d=2.5 (pre- to post-treatment) and 2.8 (pre-treatment to follow-up), respectively. The proportion of responders on the PDSS was 75% at post-treatment and 70% at 6-month follow-up. The results supports earlier efficacy data on Internet-based CBT for PD and indicates that it is effective also within a regular psychiatric setting. However, a larger randomized controlled trial should be conducted, directly comparing Internet-based CBT with traditionally administered CBT within such a setting.
PubMed ID
18985514 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medication and suicide in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46040
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Oct-Nov;10(6):525-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Carlsten
M. Waern
A. Ekedahl
J. Ranstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sweden. anders.carlsten@telia.com
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Oct-Nov;10(6):525-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore a possible temporal association between changes in antidepressant sales and suicide rates in different age groups. METHODS: A time series analysis using a two-slope model to compare suicide rates in Sweden before and after introduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs. RESULTS: Antidepressant sales increased between 1977-1979 and 1995-1997 in men from 4.2 defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants and day (DDD/t.i.d) to 21.8 and in women from 8.8 to 42.4. Antidepressant sales were twice as high in the elderly as in the 25-44-year-olds and eight times that in the 15-24-year-olds. During the same time period suicide rates decreased in men from 48.2 to 33.3 per 10(5) inhabitants/year and in women from 20.3 to 13.4. There was significant change in the slope in suicide rates after the introduction of the SSRI, for both men and women, which corresponds to approximately 348 fewer suicides during 1990-1997. Half of these 'saved lives' occurred among young adults. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate a statistically significant change in slope in suicide rates in men and women that coincided with the introduction of the SSRI antidepressants in Sweden. This change preceded the exponential increase in antidepressant sales.
PubMed ID
11828835 View in PubMed
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Antidepressants and public health in Iceland. Time series analysis of national data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45848
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2004 Feb;184:157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Tómas Helgason
Helgi Tómasson
Tómas Zoega
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. tomashe@isholf.is
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2004 Feb;184:157-62
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Public Health
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder is the second leading cause of disability-adjusted life-years in developed regions of the world and antidepressants are the third-ranking therapy class worldwide. AIMS: To test the public health impact of the escalating sales of antidepressants. METHOD: Nationwide data from Iceland are used as an example to study the effect of sales of antidepressants on suicide, disability, hospital admissions and out-patient visits. RESULTS: Sales of antidepressants increased from 8.4 daily defined doses per 1000 inhabitants per day in 1975 to 72.7 in 2000, which is a user prevalence of 8.7% for the adult population. Suicide rates fluctuated during 1950-2000 but did not show any definite trend. Rates for out-patient visits increased slightly over the period 1989-2000 and admission rates increased even more. The prevalence of disability due to depressive and anxiety disorders has not decreased over the past 25 years. CONCLUSIONS: The dramatic increase in the sales of antidepressants has not had any marked impact on the selected public health measures. Obviously, better treatment for depressive disorders is still needed in order to reduce the burden caused by them.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Psychiatry. 2005 May;186:445-6; author reply 44615952270
PubMed ID
14754829 View in PubMed
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Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia: a Danish register-based population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287562
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 May 18;6(5):e011200
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-2016
Author
Katja Biering Leth-Møller
Annette Højmann Hansen
Maia Torstensson
Stig Ejdrup Andersen
Lars Ødum
Gunnar Gislasson
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Ellen Astrid Holm
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 May 18;6(5):e011200
Date
May-18-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - therapeutic use
Citalopram - therapeutic use
Clomipramine - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Duloxetine Hydrochloride - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Hyponatremia - blood - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Mianserin - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sodium - blood
Venlafaxine Hydrochloride - therapeutic use
Abstract
To examine the association between classes of antidepressants and hyponatremia, and between specific antidepressants and hyponatremia.
Retrospective register-based cohort study using nationwide registers from 1998 to 2012.
The North Denmark Region.
In total, 638 352 individuals were included.
Plasma sodium was obtained from the LABKA database. The primary outcome was hyponatremia defined as plasma sodium (p-sodium) below 135 mmol/L and secondary outcome was severe hyponatremia defined as p-sodium below 130 mmol/L. The association between use of specific antidepressants and hyponatremia was analysed using multivariable Poisson regression models.
An event of hyponatremia occurred in 72 509 individuals and 11.36% (n=6476) of these events happened during treatment with antidepressants. Incidence rate ratios and CIs for the association with hyponatremia in the first p-sodium measured after initiation of treatment were for citalopram 7.8 (CI 7.42 to 8.20); clomipramine 4.93 (CI 2.72 to 8.94); duloxetine 2.05 (CI 1.44 to 292); venlafaxine 2.90 (CI 2.43 to 3.46); mirtazapine 2.95 (CI 2.71 to 3.21); and mianserin 0.90 (CI 0.71 to 1.14).
All antidepressants except mianserin are associated with hyponatremia. The association is strongest with citalopram and lowest with duloxetine, venlafaxine and mirtazapine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27194321 View in PubMed
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Association of Stress-Related Disorders With Subsequent Autoimmune Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292559
Source
JAMA. 2018 06 19; 319(23):2388-2400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-19-2018
Author
Huan Song
Fang Fang
Gunnar Tomasson
Filip K Arnberg
David Mataix-Cols
Lorena Fernández de la Cruz
Catarina Almqvist
Katja Fall
Unnur A Valdimarsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
JAMA. 2018 06 19; 319(23):2388-2400
Date
06-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Siblings
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - drug therapy
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - complications
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Abstract
Psychiatric reactions to life stressors are common in the general population and may result in immune dysfunction. Whether such reactions contribute to the risk of autoimmune disease remains unclear.
To determine whether there is an association between stress-related disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease.
Population- and sibling-matched retrospective cohort study conducted in Sweden from January 1, 1981, to December 31, 2013. The cohort included 106?464 exposed patients with stress-related disorders, with 1?064?640 matched unexposed persons and 126?652 full siblings of these patients.
Diagnosis of stress-related disorders, ie, posttraumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions.
Stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases were identified through the National Patient Register. The Cox model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
The median age at diagnosis of stress-related disorders was 41 years (interquartile range, 33-50 years) and 40% of the exposed patients were male. During a mean follow-up of 10 years, the incidence rate of autoimmune diseases was 9.1, 6.0, and 6.5 per 1000 person-years among the exposed, matched unexposed, and sibling cohorts, respectively (absolute rate difference, 3.12 [95% CI, 2.99-3.25] and 2.49 [95% CI, 2.23-2.76] per 1000 person-years compared with the population- and sibling-based reference groups, respectively). Compared with the unexposed population, patients with stress-related disorders were at increased risk of autoimmune disease (HR, 1.36 [95% CI, 1.33-1.40]). The HRs for patients with posttraumatic stress disorder were 1.46 (95% CI, 1.32-1.61) for any and 2.29 (95% CI, 1.72-3.04) for multiple (=3) autoimmune diseases. These associations were consistent in the sibling-based comparison. Relative risk elevations were more pronounced among younger patients (HR, 1.48 [95% CI, 1.42-1.55]; 1.41 [95% CI, 1.33-1.48]; 1.31 [95% CI, 1.24-1.37]; and 1.23 [95% CI, 1.17-1.30] for age at =33, 34-41, 42-50, and =51 years, respectively; P for interaction?
PubMed ID
29922828 View in PubMed
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Bringing a research base to psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157372
Source
CMAJ. 2008 May 6;178(10):1257-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2008
Author
Miriam Shuchman
Paul C Hébert
Rajendra Kale
Barbara Sibbald
Ken Flegel
Noni MacDonald
Source
CMAJ. 2008 May 6;178(10):1257-60
Date
May-6-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Biomedical research
Canada
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Mental Health Services - standards
Psychiatry
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Notes
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PubMed ID
18458250 View in PubMed
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Catechol-O-methyltransferase val108/158met genotype, major depressive disorder and response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146093
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2010 Mar 30;176(1):85-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2010
Author
Ari Illi
Eija Setälä-Soikkeli
Olli Kampman
Merja Viikki
Timo Nuolivirta
Outi Poutanen
Heini Huhtala
Nina Mononen
Terho Lehtimäki
Esa Leinonen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Medical School, Tampere, Finland. ari.illi@uta.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2010 Mar 30;176(1):85-7
Date
Mar-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Methionine - genetics
Pharmacogenetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Valine - genetics
Abstract
The functional val108/158met polymorphism of the COMT gene (rs4680) was evaluated in major depressive disorder (MDD), and in the treatment response to antidepressants in MDD. We could not demonstrate any significant difference in the distribution of this COMT single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or between patients with MDD and control subjects.
PubMed ID
20071037 View in PubMed
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Changes in self-concept while using SSRI antidepressants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45975
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Sep;12(7):932-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Pia Knudsen
Ebba Holme Hansen
Janine Morgall Traulsen
Kristin Eskildsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, Royal Danish School of Pharmacy.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Sep;12(7):932-44
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Interviews
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Self Administration - psychology
Self Concept
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Social Support
Abstract
In this study, the authors analyze how younger women see themselves within the context of using the antidepressants selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Twelve in-depth interviews and 6 reinterviews were conducted with a community-based sample of women who had been taking SSRIs between 1 and 4 years. The empirical analysis revealed that SSRI users passed through stages in their careers as medicine users, these stages corresponding to how the users thought and felt about themselves. Four major changes in self-concept emerged: distressed and needing help, conflicts about taking the medicine, improvements in condition, and problems discontinuing the medicine. Users evaluated themselves from what they believed was the perspective of society, and the way they saw themselves was closely related to how they felt they functioned in everyday life.
PubMed ID
12214679 View in PubMed
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Citalopram and fluoxetine in the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms: a prospective, randomized, 9-month, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45733
Source
Menopause. 2005 Jan-Feb;12(1):18-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eila Suvanto-Luukkonen
Riitta Koivunen
Helena Sundström
Risto Bloigu
Eija Karjalainen
Leena Häivä-Mällinen
Juha S Tapanainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu University Hospital, PL 24, 90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland. Eila.Suvanto-Luukkonen@oulu.fi
Source
Menopause. 2005 Jan-Feb;12(1):18-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Citalopram - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fluoxetine - therapeutic use
Hot Flashes - prevention & control
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Nonhormonal treatment of postmenopausal symptoms is a subject of great interest today. The results of studies on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are promising, but long-term results do not exist. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram and fluoxetine in the treatment of physical and psychological menopausal symptoms and their effects on psychosocial and sexual well being in symptomatic postmenopausal women. DESIGN: One hundred fifty healthy women suffering from menopausal symptoms were recruited to this placebo-controlled double-blind study with a follow-up period of 9 months. They were randomized into three groups receiving placebo, fluoxetine, or citalopram. The initial dose was 10 mg of both fluoxetine and citalopram, and it was increased to 20 mg at 1 month and to 30 mg at the 6-month visit. The main outcome measures were hot flushes and Kupperman index. The RAND-36 Quality of Life questionnaire, Beck's Depression Scale, and the McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire were used at every control visit. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in respect to number of hot flushes, Kupperman index, or Beck's Depression Scale, although there was a tendency in all these parameters in favor of SSRIs versus placebo. Insomnia improved significantly in the citalopram group versus placebo. Discontinuation rates at nine months were 40% in the placebo group, 34% in the fluoxetine group and 34% in the citalopram group. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with placebo, citalopram and fluoxetine have little effect on hot flushes and cannot therefore be recommended for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, if vasomotor symptoms are the main complaint. Whether the improvement of insomnia by means of citalopram affects the quality of sleep needs further investigation.
PubMed ID
15668596 View in PubMed
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85 records – page 1 of 9.