Skip header and navigation

Refine By

108 records – page 1 of 11.

Adverse reactions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: reports from a spontaneous reporting system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46278
Source
Drug Saf. 1999 Mar;20(3):277-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
O. Spigset
Author Affiliation
Adverse Drug Reactions Monitoring Center, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Olav.Spigset@relis.rit.no
Source
Drug Saf. 1999 Mar;20(3):277-87
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are extensively used in the treatment of depression, panic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder, and are now being evaluated in the treatment of a number of other psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of adverse reactions reported on SSRIs in Sweden and assess possible risk factors associated with the occurrence of adverse reactions to these agents. METHODS: A survey was made of 1202 reports describing 1861 adverse reactions to SSRIs submitted to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee. RESULTS: The most often reported adverse reactions were neurological symptoms (22.4%), psychiatric symptoms (19.5%) and gastrointestinal symptoms (18.0%); however, dermatological symptoms (11.4%) and general symptoms (9.8%) were also frequent. Compared with other drugs, gastrointestinal symptoms were more often reported for fluvoxamine, psychiatric symptoms were more often reported for sertraline and dermatological symptoms were more often reported for fluoxetine. In total, the diagnoses most frequently reported were nausea (n = 139), rash (n = 90), anxiety (n = 84), paraesthesias (n = 69), headache (n = 63) and diarrhoea (n = 63). Parkinsonism, confusion, hallucinations, euphoria, hyponatraemia, bradycardia and hypotension were more often reported in the elderly, whereas urticaria, akathisia, and haematological, endocrinological, sexual and some visual reactions were more often reported in individuals who were younger than average. Dermatological reactions, fatigue, hyponatraemia and cough were more common in women, whereas dyskinesias/akathisia and aggression more often were seen in men. The median SSRI dosages were above average in patients experiencing seizures, hypomania/mania, personality changes, malaise, bodyweight gain, gynaecomastia and hyperprolactinaemia/galactorrhoea. Severe symptoms, such as seizures, hyponatraemia and the serotonin syndrome, were rarely reported. CONCLUSION: Although the design of the study makes it difficult to draw conclusions about causality, a variety of adverse reactions were reported. Therefore, the awareness that a particular symptom in a patient treated with an SSRI might be an adverse reaction should be high.
PubMed ID
10221856 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alopecia associated with treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81812
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Oct;15(10):719-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Hedenmalm Karin
Sundström Anders
Spigset Olav
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. karin.hedenmalm@mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Oct;15(10):719-25
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alopecia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bayes Theorem
Citalopram - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Sertraline - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the association between alopecia and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) by estimating reporting rates and by making association comparisons within databases of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). METHODS: All reports of alopecia with marketed SSRIs until the end of 2004 were identified in SWEDIS, the national Swedish database for spontaneously reported ADRs, and in Vigibase, the international ADR database of the World Health Organization. Total SSRI sales volumes in Sweden until the end of 2004 were obtained from the National Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies. The Bayes' Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) method was used to estimate associations between alopecia and each of the SSRIs within the two databases. RESULTS: A total of 27 reports of alopecia were identified in SWEDIS. As two reports concerned the use of two SSRIs, there was a total of 29 drug-ADR combinations. All except three reports concerned women (88.9%). The reporting rate of alopecia in Sweden was significantly higher with sertraline compared with citalopram; 20.1 (95%CI 10.7-34.4) reports per million patient-years versus 4.5 (95%CI 1.8-9.3) reports per million patient-years. No significant differences in reporting rates were noted for the remaining SSRIs. Sertraline also showed a statistically significant association with alopecia in both SWEDIS and Vigibase. Citalopram was significantly associated with alopecia in Vigibase, but not in SWEDIS. No statistically significant associations were found for any of the other SSRIs. CONCLUSIONS: Alopecia appears to be a rare ADR to SSRIs. The risk of alopecia seems to vary between the different SSRIs, and might be higher in women than in men.
PubMed ID
16783834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction during treatment with moclobemide, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198452
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2000 Apr;61(4):276-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S H Kennedy
B S Eisfeld
S E Dickens
J R Bacchiochi
R M Bagby
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Ontario, Canada. sidney_kennedy@camh.net
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2000 Apr;61(4):276-81
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cyclohexanols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Humans
Libido - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Moclobemide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ontario - epidemiology
Orgasm - drug effects
Paroxetine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sertraline - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Recent reports suggest that adverse effects on sexual function occur in up to 50% of patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants. Previously cited low rates were more likely a function of underreporting than underoccurrence. There is less evidence about rates of dysfunction with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) and reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA) antidepressants. The purpose of this report is to evaluate disturbances in sexual drive/desire and arousal/orgasm in 107 patients who met criteria for major depressive disorder and received treatment with either moclobemide, paroxetine, sertraline, or venlafaxine.
All consenting eligible patients who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder completed the Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, version 1 (SFQ) and were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) prior to and after 8 or 14 weeks of antidepressant therapy. Analyses were carried out to examine the effect of gender, drug type, pretreatment level of sexual dysfunction, and drug response on reported sexual dysfunction.
Compared with women, men experienced a significantly greater level of drug-related impairment in drive/desire (p
PubMed ID
10830148 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant medication use and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198230
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 May 15;151(10):951-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2000
Author
M. Cotterchio
N. Kreiger
G. Darlington
A. Steingart
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 May 15;151(10):951-7
Date
May-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - classification
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Paroxetine - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Experimental and epidemiologic studies suggest that antidepressant medication use may be associated with breast cancer risk. This hypothesis was investigated using a population-based case-control study; cases diagnosed in 1995-1996 were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry, and controls were randomly sampled from an Ontario Ministry of Finance database. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, and multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Adjusted odds ratio estimates ranged from 0.7 to 0.8 and were not statistically significant for "ever" use of antidepressants, tricyclics, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Compared with no antidepressant use, use of tricyclic antidepressants for greater than 2 years' duration was associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9, 5.0). Of the six most commonly reported antidepressant medications, only paroxetine use was associated with an increase in breast cancer risk (OR = 7.2, 95% CI: 0.9, 58.3). Results from this study do not support the hypothesis that "ever" use of any antidepressant medications is associated with breast cancer risk. Use of tricyclic medications for greater than 2 years, however, may be associated with a twofold elevation, and use of paroxetine may be associated with a substantial increase in breast cancer risk.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec 1;152(11):1104-511117620
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec 1;152(11):1104; author reply 110511117621
PubMed ID
10853633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressants and adverse effects in young patients: uncovering the evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181467
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Feb 17;170(4):487-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-2004
Author
Andrew Herxheimer
Barbara Mintzes
Author Affiliation
Cochrane Collaboration, London, England. Andrew_Herxheimer@compuserve.com
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Feb 17;170(4):487-9
Date
Feb-17-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Canada
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Approval
Great Britain
Humans
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - etiology
Suicide
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 Feb 17;170(4):489-9114970097
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1960 Feb;23:56-6214399272
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jan 24-31;285(4):437-4311242428
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;159(3):469-7311870014
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Nov 25;169(11):1167-7014638652
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1991 Mar;30(2):179-862016219
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Sep 8;159(5):481-39757171
Comment In: CMAJ. 2004 Jun 8;170(12):1771; author reply 1171-215184311
Comment On: CMAJ. 2004 Feb 17;170(4):489-9114970097
PubMed ID
14970096 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressants and risk of first-time hospitalization for myocardial infarction: a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45757
Source
Am J Med. 2004 Nov 15;117(10):732-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2004
Author
Taco B M Monster
Søren P Johnsen
Mette L Olsen
Joseph K McLaughlin
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus and Aalborg, Denmark. t.monster@home.nl
Source
Am J Med. 2004 Nov 15;117(10):732-7
Date
Nov-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Abstract
PURPOSE: Several studies have found an increased risk of myocardial infarction among depressed patients. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appear to lack the arrhythmic adverse effects of tricyclic antidepressants, and are thought to inhibit platelet aggregation. We examined whether use of different antidepressant classes is associated with a lower risk of first-time hospitalization for myocardial infarction, as compared with nonuse. METHODS: We identified 8887 cases of first-time hospitalization for myocardial infarction and 88,862 age- and sex-matched population-based controls during 1994-2002, using data from North Jutland County, Denmark. Cases and controls were stratified according to history of cardiovascular disease. All prescriptions for antidepressants before hospitalization for myocardial infarction were identified using a prescription database. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios of myocardial infarction associated with antidepressant use, adjusted for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: In patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, we found indications of a lower risk of myocardial infarction among those who used SSRIs (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62 to 1.16), nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (adjusted OR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.50 to 1.38), and other antidepressants (adjusted OR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.97). There were no such associations among persons without a history of cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSION: Antidepressant use may be associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction among persons with a history of cardiovascular disease, although it remains uncertain whether there are differences by class of antidepressant.
PubMed ID
15541322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressants and risk of prostate cancer: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162021
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2008;11(1):53-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
H M Tamim
S. Mahmud
J A Hanley
J-F Boivin
M R Stang
J-P Collet
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Montréal, Québec, Canada. hani_t@hotmail.com
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2008;11(1):53-60
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Abstract
Although the association between antidepressant drug use and risk of cancer has received considerable attention in the past years, no work has been done specifically on prostate cancer. We carried out a population-based case-control study to assess the risk of prostate cancer in association with exposure to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). 7767 prostate cancer cases diagnosed between 1981 and 2000 were accrued through the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency. Saskatchewan Health identified a total of 31,068 male controls who were matched on age and calendar time. Data on exposure to TCAs and SSRIs were compiled from the Saskatchewan outpatient prescription drug database, and covered a period upto 24 years. A positive significant association was found between TCA use and risk of prostate cancer, when exposure took place 2-5 years before diagnosis, with rate ratios of 1.31, 1.58, and 2.42 at the low, medium and high average daily dose levels, respectively. Exposure to SSRIs was not found to be significantly associated with the risk of prostate cancer. TCA use 2-5 years in the past was associated with a small dose-dependent increase in the risk of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, detection bias could have contributed to the observed association.
PubMed ID
17684479 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressants and the risk of suicide, attempted suicide, and overall mortality in a nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166258
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;63(12):1358-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Jari.Tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;63(12):1358-67
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
It is unknown if antidepressant treatment is associated with either increased or decreased risk of suicide.
To estimate the risk of suicide, attempted suicide, and overall mortality during antidepressant treatments in a real-life setting with high statistical power.
A cohort study in which all subjects without psychosis, hospitalized because of a suicide attempt from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2003, in Finland, were followed up through a nationwide computerized database.
A total of 15 390 patients with a mean follow-up of 3.4 years.
The propensity score-adjusted relative risks (RRs) during monotherapy with the most frequently used antidepressants compared with no antidepressant treatment.
In the entire cohort, fluoxetine use was associated with the lowest risk (RR, 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.93), and venlafaxine hydrochloride use with the highest risk (RR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.01-2.57), of suicide. A substantially lower mortality was observed during selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71; P
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2007 Aug;10(3):9017652572
PubMed ID
17146010 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant treatment of premature ejaculation: discontinuation rates and prevalence of side effects for dapoxetine and paroxetine in a naturalistic setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268451
Source
Int J Impot Res. 2015 Mar-Apr;27(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Jern
A. Johansson
J. Piha
L. Westberg
P. Santtila
Source
Int J Impot Res. 2015 Mar-Apr;27(2):75-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Benzylamines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naphthalenes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Paroxetine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Premature Ejaculation - drug therapy
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate prevalence of and reasons for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) discontinuation, and compare the two most common SSRIs used in premature ejaculation (PE) treatment, in naturalistic settings (that is, outside clinical trials). The sample consisted of 132 Finnish men with a mean age of 42.5 years (s.d. = 10.6) who had received medical treatment for lifelong PE. The men were enlisted for the study after identifying individuals from the third author's (a physician specializing in sexual medicine) patient registry. Participants responded to a secure, online questionnaire. PE treatment-related side effects of, and discontinuation rates for, different SSRIs were retrospectively self-reported. Treatment efficacy and happiness with treatment were retrospectively self-assessed. Discontinuation rates were uniformly high, ranging from 28.8 to 70.6% between different SSRIs. Dapoxetine was associated with the highest dropout rates (70.6%), and paroxetine the lowest, discontinuation rates. Limited efficacy and side effects were the most common reasons for discontinuation. Paroxetine was more effective and better tolerated than dapoxetine. A considerable number of patients chose to spontaneously discontinue treatment, especially so in the case of dapoxetine, corroborating recent studies conducted in naturalistic settings. Further research efforts are necessary to develop new and improve existing PE treatment alternatives.
PubMed ID
25410962 View in PubMed
Less detail

108 records – page 1 of 11.