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2001 serological survey in the Czech Republic--poliomyelitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180596
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;11 Suppl:S31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
I. Matyásová
P. Rainetová
J. Cástková
Author Affiliation
Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology, NRL for Enteroviruses, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. matyasova@szu.cz
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;11 Suppl:S31-5
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Data Collection
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Poliomyelitis - blood - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Poliovirus - immunology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral - administration & dosage
Serologic Tests
Abstract
Regular vaccination against poliomyelitis was started in 1960 with oral polio vaccine (OPV). Since 1992 a trivalent OPV has been administered in five doses within a nationwide vaccination campaign. The immunization coverage varies between 96.8% and 98.2% after 4 OPV doses, reaching 98.0% to 98.9% after the fifth dose. No case of indigenous poliomyelitis has been reported in the Czech Republic since the second half of 1960. In 2001, 3,230 sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against poliovirus of types 1, 2 and 3 using a virus neutralization microassay. The prevalence rates of antibodies vary between 96.0% and 100% for types 1 and 2 and between 95.1% and 100% for type 3, with the exception of the highest age group, in which the prevalence rates of antibodies against poliovirus of all three types are 92.2%.
PubMed ID
15080257 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of serologic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in school-aged children of mixed ethnicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32221
Source
Helicobacter. 2001 Mar;6(1):24-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
Y. Tindberg
C. Bengtsson
M. Bergström
M. Granström
Author Affiliation
Sachs' Department of Pediatrics, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Ylva.Tindberg@mep.ki.se
Source
Helicobacter. 2001 Mar;6(1):24-30
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens, Bacterial - metabolism
Bacterial Proteins - metabolism
Breath Tests
Child
Comparative Study
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Evaluation Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - ethnology
Helicobacter pylori - metabolism
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Serologic Tests - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Urea - analysis
Abstract
The present study evaluated two non-invasive diagnostic methods for H. pylori infection in children, i.e. an in-house ELISA using sonicated Campylobacter jejuni antigen for absorption of cross-reacting antibodies and an immunoblot kit (Helico Blot 2.0, Genelabs, Singapore). 13C -Urea breath test (13C-UBT) was used as reference METHOD: Sera and questionnaires were collected from 695/858 (81%) Swedish school children with mixed ethnic backgrounds within a cross-sectional, community-based study. Of 133 children with an ELISA OD value of > or = 0.1, all were screened with immunoblot and 107 made a 13C-UBT. The negative controls were 34/37 children from three school classes with an ELISA OD value of
PubMed ID
11328362 View in PubMed
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Acquired aplastic anaemia in seven children with severe hepatitis with or without liver failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87545
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Honkaniemi Emma
Gustafsson Britt
Fischler Björn
Nemeth Antal
Frost Britt-Marie
Papadogiannakis Nikos
Winiarski Jacek
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Clintec, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. emma.honkaniemi@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anemia, Aplastic - etiology - therapy
Biopsy
Bone Marrow Cells - pathology
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hepatitis - complications - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Failure - etiology
Male
Medical Records
Parvovirus - pathogenicity
Retrospective Studies
Serologic Tests
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Aplastic anaemia following hepatitis may develop in as many as 1 of 3 patients with non-A, non-B and non-C hepatitis. Several causative factors have been discussed, such as viral infections and autoimmunity. Here we describe the natural history of this condition in 7 children and investigate possible hepatitis-causing agents. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records, bone marrow and liver biopsies of 7 children with severe hepatitis, with or without liver failure, who subsequently had developed aplastic anaemia. RESULTS: The median time from onset of hepatic symptoms until diagnosed onset of aplasia was 54 days. No associated viral infections could be identified. On liver biopsy, a majority had lobular inflammation but lacked signs of autoimmune hepatitis, findings compatible with a viral aetiology. Three of 6 children had low reticulocyte counts already at onset of hepatitis. All, but one patient is alive at median follow-up of 8 years. CONCLUSION: The unknown pathogenetic mechanism appears to target liver and bone marrow simultaneously, because half of the children concomitantly had low reticulocyte counts and severe liver failure.
PubMed ID
17888058 View in PubMed
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Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori infection: comparison of a high and a low prevalence country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35031
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(2):181-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
P. Lindkvist
D. Asrat
I. Nilsson
E. Tsega
G L Olsson
B. Wretlind
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Huddinge Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(2):181-4
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developing Countries
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Ethiopia - epidemiology
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Serologic Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori (HP) is now generally accepted as the main aetiological agent in chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer. Infection with HP is widespread, but the routes of transmission are still unclear. Several studies have shown increasing prevalence of antibodies against HP with age. In developing countries, age at peak incidence of seroconversion is probably considerably lower than in developed countries. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the age at maximum incidence of seroconversion to HP in a high-prevalence country (Ethiopia) and in a low-prevalence country (Sweden). Sera from 242 Ethiopian children, aged 2-14 years and from 295 Swedish children aged 1-15 years were analysed using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. In Ethiopia, a comparison was made of a local and a reference strain for preparation of the antigen, but there was little difference in outcome. A comparison between antigen prepared from the reference strain and the pooled antigen used in the Swedish study also showed little difference. The sharpest rise in seroprevalence was found in the age range 2-4 years. Among 4-year-olds, some 60% had already seroconverted, and among 12-year-olds almost 100% had done so. In Sweden, the sharpest rise appeared between the ages of 9 and 10 years. Above 10 years of age seroprevalence was around 20%. Infection with HP is acquired in early childhood in Ethiopia, but somewhat later, although still before the teens, in Sweden. To determine properly the risk factors for infection with HP, possible exposure must be assessed around the age of seroconversion, since seropositivity may remain for a long time but environmental factors may have changed since primary infection.
PubMed ID
8792487 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of measles serodiagnosis during an outbreak in a vaccinated community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232723
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1988 Aug;11(4):304-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
L. Sekla
W. Stackiw
G. Eibisch
I. Johnson
Author Affiliation
Cadham Provincial Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1988 Aug;11(4):304-9
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Male
Manitoba
Measles - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Measles Vaccine - immunology
Measles virus - immunology
Serologic Tests
Abstract
During an epidemic of measles in a vaccinated community, five serodiagnostic tests were performed on 67 persons on whom clinical and epidemiological data were available. The test found most suitable for a rapid diagnosis of measles infection was an Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay for the detection of specific IgM antibodies. Only one false negative IgM was recorded. In a group of 45 persons who fulfilled the clinical definition of measles, specific IgM antibodies were detected in the acute phase serum of only 30 (66.6%), of whom 17 were vaccinated. When the convalescent sera were tested, specific IgM antibodies were detected in 25 of the 28 (89.2%) vaccinated, and in 17 of the 17 (100%) non vaccinated clinical cases. A convalescent blood should be tested in persons with a rash illness and no IgM antibodies in the acute phase serum. There were individual variations in the time of appearance of IgM. On the day of onset of rash, IgM antibodies were detected in 7 of the 12 (58.3%). A history of prior vaccination is not always associated with immunity nor with the presence of specific antibodies.
PubMed ID
3168353 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the micromethods used in a multiple antibody survey in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249094
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Jan-Feb;69(1):54-9, 63
Publication Type
Article

[An immunoenzyme method for detecting Brucella antibodies and antigen in the blood serum of animal breeders from farms with an unfavorable brucellosis situation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213984
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):53-4
Publication Type
Article

An increase in sudden unexpected cardiac deaths among young Swedish orienteers during 1979-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54649
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Jun;17(6):902-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
L. Wesslén
C. Påhlson
O. Lindquist
E. Hjelm
J. Gnarpe
E. Larsson
U. Baandrup
L. Eriksson
J. Fohlman
L. Engstrand
T. Linglöf
C. Nyström-Rosander
H. Gnarpe
L. Magnius
C. Rolf
G. Friman
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Jun;17(6):902-10
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Myocarditis - microbiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serologic Tests
Sex Distribution
Sports
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sixteen cases of sudden unexpected cardiac death, 15 males and one female, are known to have occurred among young Swedish orienteers from 1979 to 1992, of which seven cases occurred between 1989 and 1992. This is considered to be indicative of an increased death rate. RESULTS: Histopathological evaluation showed myocarditis in a higher than expected proportion of cases. In one such case, which we studied before the sudden unexpected death occurred, the victim had suffered a Chlamydia pneumoniae infection verified by serology, and a nucleotide sequence was found in the heart and lung by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that hybridized with a probe specific for that organism. Male Swedish orienteers do not, however, seem to have an increased rate of exposure to this agent. No further sudden unexpected deaths among young orienteers have occurred over the past 3.5 years. At the beginning of that period, attempts were made to modify training habits and attitudes.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Jun;17(6):810-28781814
PubMed ID
8781830 View in PubMed
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278 records – page 1 of 28.