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771 records – page 1 of 78.

A 10-year follow-up study of tick-borne encephalitis in the Stockholm area and a review of the literature: need for a vaccination strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35021
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Haglund
M. Forsgren
G. Lindh
L. Lindquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Stockholm Country Council, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(3):217-24
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - complications
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sensation Disorders - complications
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
143 people treated for tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) were included in a retrospective follow-up study. Sequelae and epidemiological characteristics in 114 individuals were analysed. The case fatality rate and the prevalence of residual paresis were low, 1.4 and 2.7%, respectively. However, 40 (35.7%) individuals were found to have a postencephalitic syndrome after a median follow-up time of 47 months, and a majority (77.5%) of these were classified as moderate to severe. Various mental disorders, balance and co-ordination disorders and headache were the most frequently reported symptoms. Increasing age was correlated to a longer duration of hospital stay, longer convalescence and increased risk of permanent sequelae. Results from a neuropsychiatric questionnaire showed marked differences between the subjects with sequelae compared to controls. 57% had noticed a tick bite before admission, and 48% were aware of at least one person in their environment who previously had contracted TBE. 79% were permanent residents or visited endemic areas often and regularly. In conclusion, we have found that TBE in the Stockholm area has a low case fatality rate, but gives rise to a considerable number of different neurological and mental sequelae, which justifies vaccination of a defined risk population in endemic areas.
PubMed ID
8863349 View in PubMed
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The 1994 human parvovirus B19 epidemic in Denmark: diagnostic and epidemiological experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33617
Source
APMIS. 1998 Sep;106(9):843-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
I P Jensen
O. Schou
B F Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 1998 Sep;106(9):843-8
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Parvovirus B19, Human - immunology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
In 1994 the first human parvovirus B19 (B19) epidemic to be documented in Denmark was recorded from February 2 to September 30. In total, 10,333 serum samples were tested for specific B19 IgM and IgG antibodies, using IDEIA Parvovirus B19 IgM and IgG kits. The prevalence of B19 IgM positivity was 11% for the whole period and 29% at the peak of the epidemic in week 14, declining from week 39 and onwards to 1-3%. The prevalence of B19 IgG (IgM-negative samples) was 60%, indicating an earlier infection, and the same for men and women. The gender distribution of tested patients was the same at the beginning of the epidemic as at the end of the epidemic and a year after its peak, i.e. 86% of samples were from women and only 14% from men. Age distribution for women was the same for the three periods (median age 34 years). For men the median age was 32 years, 39 years and 31 years, respectively. Only a few samples from children were tested. No change in test pattern was observed during the three periods. Approximately 75% of all samples tested were from women of childbearing age (18-45 years old), suggesting a fear of fetal complications in an actual or future pregnancy, rather than a serological verification of clinical symptoms. From the sparse clinical information that accompanied the serum sample we were not able to demonstrate that women were more likely than men to have a symptomatic B19 infection. With reservations we estimate that 14% of adverse pregnancy outcome is correlated with a B19 infection.
PubMed ID
9808410 View in PubMed
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Absence of novel human parvovirus (PARV4) in Danish mothers and children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268747
Source
J Clin Virol. 2015 Apr;65:23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Marie-Louise von Linstow
Vibeke Rosenfeldt
Ellinor Lindberg
Lise Jensen
Lea Hedman
Xuemeng Li
Elina Väisänen
Klaus Hedman
Päivi Norja
Source
J Clin Virol. 2015 Apr;65:23-5
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Parvovirus - immunology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population Surveillance
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is found most frequently in injection drug users, HIV-positive patients, and in haemophiliacs. Studies from Ghana report the finding of PARV4 in plasma from 2 to 12% of children without acute infection, and in nasal secretions and faecal samples. Studies of PARV4 in children from industrialized countries are few.
We aimed to describe the occurrence of PARV4 in a population-based birth cohort of 228 Danish mothers and their healthy children who previously participated in a study of respiratory tract infections in infancy.
Children were included over a whole calendar year and were monitored through monthly home visits through the first year of life. Plasma samples for the present study were available from 228 mothers, 176 newborns, and 202 12-months-old children. All samples were analysed for the presence of PARV4 antibodies by enzyme immunoassay, and samples with detectable antibodies were in addition studied by real-time PCR.
One (0.4%) of 228 mothers had PARV4 IgG exceeding the cut-off absorbance level and another had borderline IgG reactivity. No mother among these two had an acute infection, as they were IgM and PARV4 DNA negative. All blood samples from newborns and one-year-old children had IgG and IgM reactivity below cut-off.
PARV4 is rare in Danish mothers and infants. Further studies are needed, in both rural and urban settings, to investigate the epidemiology and clinical significance of this novel human parvovirus.
PubMed ID
25766982 View in PubMed
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[A case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in the Anapa District, Krasnodar Territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140350
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2010 Jul-Aug;55(4):39-40
Publication Type
Article

Accelerated decline in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence rate during the screen and treat project in Vammala, Finland, as demonstrated in 29- to 45-year-old pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181548
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Leena Rehnberg-Laiho
Anniina Salomaa
Hilpi Rautelin
Pentti Koskela
Seppo Sarna
Timo U Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartman Institute, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Stomach Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The potential preventability of serious helicobacter-associated diseases - especially gastric cancer - has evoked interest in eradicating this pathogen from the population. We assessed the efficacy of the pioneering screen and treat intervention project in Vammala by studying helicobacter seroprevalence in pregnant women representing the normal population. Consecutive maternity clinic samples from native Finnish females at five different localities in 1995 (n=701) and 2000 (n=772) were investigated for class IgG H. pylori antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (Pyloriset EIA-G III, Orion Diagnostica, Espoo, Finland). In Vammala the change in helicobacter seroprevalence was -13%-units (between 1995 and 2000; p=0.0125, chi-square test) in > or =29-year-old females, +1.6%-units (difference statistically non-significant) in
PubMed ID
14961972 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and outcome of herpes simplex virus type 2 antibody testing in patients attending an STD clinic--recognized and unrecognized infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70622
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2005;85(3):248-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Gun-Britt Löwhagen
Matilda Berntsson
Ellen Bonde
Petra Tunbäck
Ingela Krantz
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. gun-britt.lowhagen@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2005;85(3):248-52
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Herpes Genitalis - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Herpesvirus 2, Human - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The majority of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital infections are asymptomatic. We wanted to evaluate the acceptance of HSV-2 antibody testing among people attending an STD clinic and to estimate, after counselling, the percentage of recognized and unrecognized HSV-2 infections. First visitors to an STD clinic were invited to participate by answering a questionnaire and taking a blood test for HSV-2 antibodies. HSV-2 seropositive individuals, who were unaware of having genital herpes, were offered an HSV-2 counselling visit and follow-up. Of 1769 patients offered testing, 57% accepted. Of 152 (15%) HSV-2 seropositive individuals, 41% had a self-reported history of genital herpes, approximately 30% had genital symptoms and 30% had no genital symptoms. The percentage of patients reporting genital symptoms was much higher in HSV-2 seropositives (45%) without a history of genital herpes than in an HSV-2 seronegative group (28%). HSV-2 antibody testing should be performed generously in all cases of uncharacteristic genital symptoms.
PubMed ID
16040412 View in PubMed
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Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae seroprevalence in farmed wild boars in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261057
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2014 Dec;45(4):813-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Outi Hälli
Eve Ala-Kurikka
Per Wallgren
Mari Heinonen
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2014 Dec;45(4):813-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacillus Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae - isolation & purification
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Finland - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sus scrofa
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of serum antibodies to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) in Finnish farmed wild boars and to evaluate basic risk factors for seropositivity of the agent. A sampling frame was compiled based on the national record of wild boar farmers (n = 117), and 26 herds were included in the study. Serum samples (n = 206) were obtained from all animals slaughtered from these herds during the 2007-2008 period. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques were used to detect the possible presence of antibodies toward 12 serotypes of APP. Altogether, 1,442 analyses were performed, out of which 35 (2.4%) exceeded the positive cut-off value. Correspondingly, 26 of the pigs (12.6%) were found to be seropositive for any serotype of APP. The apparent animal prevalence of the cross-reacting APP serotypes 1, 9, and 11 was 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1-7%); it was 0.5% (CI 0-1%) for serotype 2; 3.4% (CI 1-6%) for serotypes 3, 6, and 8; 7.3% (CI 4-11%) for serotypes 4 and 7; 0.5% (CI 0-1%) for serotype 10; and 1.5% (CI 0-3%) for serotype 12. No antibodies against serotype 5s were detected. The apparent farm prevalence of APP serotypes 1,9, and 11 was 15.4% (CI 2-29%); that of serotype 2 was 3.8% (CI 0-11%); that of serotypes 3, 6, and 8 was 11.5% (CI 0-24%); that of serotypes 4 and 7 was 34.6% (CI 16-53%); that of serotype 10 was 3.8% (CI 0-11%); and that of serotype 12 was 7.7% (CI 0-18%). In conclusion, the prevalence of serum antibodies to different APP serotypes was low in farmed wild boar. Risk factor analysis did not reveal any significant animal- or herd-level risk factors for seropositivity of the agent.
PubMed ID
25632667 View in PubMed
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Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278936
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 May;22(5):810-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Niina Putkuri
Anu Kantele
Lev Levanov
Ilkka Kivistö
Markus Brummer-Korvenkontio
Antti Vaheri
Olli Vapalahti
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 May;22(5):810-7
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Bunyaviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Geography
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - immunology
Incidence
Orthobunyavirus - classification - genetics - immunology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Serogroup
Abstract
Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (
Notes
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PubMed ID
27088268 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent prevalence of antibodies cross-reactive to the influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in sera collected in Norway in 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124250
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(19)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
K. Waalen
A. Kilander
S G Dudman
R. Ramos-Ocao
O. Hungnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. kristian.waalen@fhi.no
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(19)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions - immunology
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - immunology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Antibody cross-reactivity to the influenza A(H3N2) variant virus recently reported in the United States, was investigated in Norwegian sera. Seroprevalence was 40% overall, and 71% in people born between 1977 and 1993. The most susceptible age groups were children and people aged around 50 years. The high immunity in young adults is likely to be due to strong priming infection with similar viruses in the 1990s. More research is needed to explain the poor immunity in 45?54 year-olds.
PubMed ID
22607964 View in PubMed
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771 records – page 1 of 78.