Skip header and navigation

Refine By

67 records – page 1 of 7.

Ancient DNA analysis of human neolithic remains found in northeastern Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175822
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Apr;126(4):458-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
François-Xavier Ricaut
A. Fedoseeva
Christine Keyser-Tracqui
Eric Crubézy
Bertrand Ludes
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire d'Anthropologie Moléculaire, Institut de Médecine Légale, 67085 Strasbourg, France. fx.ricaut@infonie.fr
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Apr;126(4):458-62
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
DNA - genetics
DNA Primers
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Fossils
Gene Frequency
Geography
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Polymorphism, Genetic
Population Dynamics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia
Tandem Repeat Sequences - genetics
Abstract
We successfully extracted DNA from a bone sample of a Neolithic skeleton (dated 3,600 +/- 60 years BP) excavated in northeastern Yakutia (east Siberia). Ancient DNA was analyzed by autosomal STRs (short tandem repeats) and by sequencing of the hypervariable region I (HV1) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. The STR profile, the mitochondrial haplotype, and the haplogroup determined were compared with those of modern Eurasian and Native American populations. The results showed the affinity of this ancient skeleton with both east Siberian/Asian and Native American populations.
PubMed ID
15756672 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ancient DNA reveals lack of postglacial habitat tracking in the arctic fox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78142
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Apr 17;104(16):6726-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2007
Author
Dalén Love
Nyström Veronica
Valdiosera Cristina
Germonpré Mietje
Sablin Mikhail
Turner Elaine
Angerbjörn Anders
Arsuaga Juan Luis
Götherström Anders
Author Affiliation
Centro UCM-ISCIII de Evolución y Comportamiento Humanos, C/ Sinesio Delgado 4, Pabellón 14, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Apr 17;104(16):6726-9
Date
Apr-17-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Ecosystem
Evolution
Fossils
Foxes - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Natural History
Scandinavia
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
How species respond to an increased availability of habitat, for example at the end of the last glaciation, has been well established. In contrast, little is known about the opposite process, when the amount of habitat decreases. The hypothesis of habitat tracking predicts that species should be able to track both increases and decreases in habitat availability. The alternative hypothesis is that populations outside refugia become extinct during periods of unsuitable climate. To test these hypotheses, we used ancient DNA techniques to examine genetic variation in the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) through an expansion/contraction cycle. The results show that the arctic fox in midlatitude Europe became extinct at the end of the Pleistocene and did not track the habitat when it shifted to the north. Instead, a high genetic similarity between the extant populations in Scandinavia and Siberia suggests an eastern origin for the Scandinavian population at the end of the last glaciation. These results provide new insights into how species respond to climate change, since they suggest that populations are unable to track decreases in habitat avaliability. This implies that arctic species may be particularly vulnerable to increases in global temperatures.
PubMed ID
17420452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145606
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Camilla F Speller
Brian M Kemp
Scott D Wyatt
Cara Monroe
William D Lipe
Ursula M Arndt
Dongya Y Yang
Author Affiliation
Ancient DNA Laboratory, Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - genetics
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Breeding - methods
Cluster analysis
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Demography
Feces - chemistry
Fossils
Founder Effect
Geography
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Southwestern United States
Species Specificity
Turkeys - genetics
Abstract
Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC-AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices.
Notes
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2002 Apr;11(4):643-5711972754
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2003 Aug 12;19(12):1572-412912839
Cites: Nat Rev Genet. 2003 Nov;4(11):900-1014634637
Cites: Brief Bioinform. 2004 Jun;5(2):150-6315260895
Cites: Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Apr;132(4):605-2117243155
Cites: Am J Phys Anthropol. 1998 Apr;105(4):539-439584894
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 1999 Jan;16(1):37-4810331250
Cites: Trends Genet. 2006 Mar;22(3):139-5516458995
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1994 Nov 11;22(22):4673-807984417
PubMed ID
20133614 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appraisal of the consequences of the DDT-induced bottleneck on the level and geographic distribution of neutral genetic variation in Canadian peregrine falcons, Falco peregrinus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79178
Source
Mol Ecol. 2007 Jan;16(2):327-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Brown Joseph W
van Coeverden de Groot Peter J
Birt Tim P
Seutin Gilles
Boag Peter T
Friesen Vicki L
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. josephwb@umich.edu
Source
Mol Ecol. 2007 Jan;16(2):327-43
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Bayes Theorem
Canada
Cluster analysis
Conservation of Natural Resources
DDT - toxicity
DNA Primers
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Falconiformes - classification - genetics
Genetics, Population
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Models, Genetic
Molecular Sequence Data
Pesticides - toxicity
Population Dynamics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Variation (Genetics) - drug effects
Abstract
Peregrine falcon populations underwent devastating declines in the mid-20th century due to the bioaccumulation of organochlorine contaminants, becoming essentially extirpated east of the Great Plains and significantly reduced elsewhere in North America. Extensive re-introduction programs and restrictions on pesticide use in Canada and the United States have returned many populations to predecline sizes. A proper population genetic appraisal of the consequences of this decline requires an appropriate context defined by (i) meaningful demographic entities; and (ii) suitable reference populations. Here we explore the validity of currently recognized subspecies designations using data from the mitochondrial control region and 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci taken from 184 contemporary individuals from across the breeding range, and compare patterns of population genetic structure with historical patterns inferred from 95 museum specimens. Of the three North American subspecies, the west coast marine subspecies Falco peregrinus pealei is well differentiated genetically in both time periods using nuclear loci. In contrast, the partitioning of continental Falco peregrinus anatum and arctic Falco peregrinus tundrius subspecies is not substantiated, as individuals from these subspecies are historically indistinguishable genetically. Bayesian clustering analyses demonstrate that contemporary genetic differentiation between these two subspecies is mainly due to changes within F. p. anatum (specifically the southern F. p. anatum populations). Despite expectations and a variety of tests, no genetic bottleneck signature is found in the identified populations; in fact, many contemporary indices of diversity are higher than historical values. These results are rationalized by the promptness of the recovery and the possible introduction of new genetic material.
PubMed ID
17217348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of the extirpated Maritimes walrus using morphological and ancient DNA analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260057
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e99569
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Brenna A McLeod
Timothy R Frasier
Zoe Lucas
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e99569
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
DNA - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Discriminant Analysis
Extinction, Biological
Female
Geography
Haplotypes
Male
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Molecular Sequence Data
Oceans and Seas
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Skull - anatomy & histology
Walruses - anatomy & histology - genetics
Abstract
Species biogeography is a result of complex events and factors associated with climate change, ecological interactions, anthropogenic impacts, physical geography, and evolution. To understand the contemporary biogeography of a species, it is necessary to understand its history. Specimens from areas of localized extinction are important, as extirpation of species from these areas may represent the loss of unique adaptations and a distinctive evolutionary trajectory. The walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) has a discontinuous circumpolar distribution in the arctic and subarctic that once included the southeastern Canadian Maritimes region. However, exploitation of the Maritimes population during the 16th-18th centuries led to extirpation, and the species has not inhabited areas south of 55°N for ~250 years. We examined genetic and morphological characteristics of specimens from the Maritimes, Atlantic (O. r. rosmarus) and Pacific (O. r. divergens) populations to test the hypothesis that the first group was distinctive. Analysis of Atlantic and Maritimes specimens indicated that most skull and mandibular measurements were significantly different between the Maritimes and Atlantic groups and discriminant analysis of principal components confirmed them as distinctive groups, with complete isolation of skull features. The Maritimes walrus appear to have been larger animals, with larger and more robust tusks, skulls and mandibles. The mtDNA control region haplotypes identified in Maritimes specimens were unique to the region and a greater average number of nucleotide differences were found between the regions (Atlantic and Maritimes) than within either group. Levels of diversity (h and p) were lower in the Maritimes, consistent with other studies of species at range margins. Our data suggest that the Maritimes walrus was a morphologically and genetically distinctive group that was on a different evolutionary path from other walrus found in the north Atlantic.
Notes
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2001 Aug;17(8):754-511524383
Cites: Biotechniques. 2003 May;34(5):932-4, 93612765017
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2003 Dec 12;19(18):2496-714668244
Cites: Nature. 2003 Dec 11;426(6967):655-814668862
Cites: BMC Ecol. 2003 Oct 23;3:914572316
Cites: J Mol Evol. 1985;22(2):160-743934395
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1998 Oct;7(10):1323-369787444
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 1999 Jan;16(1):37-4810331250
Cites: J Hum Evol. 2006 Feb;50(2):203-1816310833
Cites: BMC Evol Biol. 2006;6:2916563161
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Nov 1;23(21):2947-817846036
Cites: Ecol Appl. 2008 Mar;18(2 Suppl):S56-7618494363
Cites: BMC Genet. 2010;11:9420950446
PubMed ID
24924490 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brief communication: Evolution of a specific O allele (O1vG542A) supports unique ancestry of Native Americans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108611
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2013 Aug;151(4):649-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Fernando A Villanea
Deborah A Bolnick
Cara Monroe
Rosita Worl
Rosemary Cambra
Alan Leventhal
Brian M Kemp
Author Affiliation
School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, USA.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2013 Aug;151(4):649-57
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Alaska
Alleles
Base Sequence
Biological Evolution
California
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Demography
Gene Flow - genetics
Genetics, Population
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1v(G542A) , which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1v(G542A) was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1v(G542A) is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene speaking groups share close ancestry with other Native American groups and support a Beringian origin of the allele, consistent with the Beringian Incubation Model. If O1v(G542A) is found in pre-Columbian populations, it would further support a Beringian origin of the allele, rather than a more recent introduction of the allele into the Americas via gene flow from one or more populations which have admixed with Native Americans over the past five centuries. We identified this allele in one Na-Dene population at a frequency of 0.11, and one ancient California population at a frequency of 0.20. Our results support a Beringian origin of O1v(G542A) , which is distributed today among all Native American groups that have been genotyped in appreciable numbers at this locus. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Na-Dene and other Native American populations primarily derive their ancestry from a single source population.
PubMed ID
23868176 View in PubMed
Less detail

Causes and consequences of fine-scale population structure in a critically endangered freshwater seal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257095
Source
BMC Ecol. 2014;14:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mia Valtonen
Jukka U Palo
Jouni Aspi
Minna Ruokonen
Mervi Kunnasranta
Tommi Nyman
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland. mia.valtonen@uef.fi.
Source
BMC Ecol. 2014;14:22
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Cluster analysis
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Endangered Species
Female
Finland
Fresh Water
Gene Flow
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Models, Genetic
Population Density
Seals, Earless - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Small, genetically uniform populations may face an elevated risk of extinction due to reduced environmental adaptability and individual fitness. Fragmentation can intensify these genetic adversities and, therefore, dispersal and gene flow among subpopulations within an isolated population is often essential for maintaining its viability. Using microsatellite and mtDNA data, we examined genetic diversity, spatial differentiation, interregional gene flow, and effective population sizes in the critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal (Phoca hispida saimensis), which is endemic to the large but highly fragmented Lake Saimaa in southeastern Finland.
Microsatellite diversity within the subspecies (HE?=?0.36) ranks among the lowest thus far recorded within the order Pinnipedia, with signs of ongoing loss of individual heterozygosity, reflecting very low effective subpopulation sizes. Bayesian assignment analyses of the microsatellite data revealed clear genetic differentiation among the main breeding areas, but interregional structuring was substantially weaker in biparentally inherited microsatellites (FST?=?0.107) than in maternally inherited mtDNA (FST?=?0.444), indicating a sevenfold difference in the gene flow mediated by males versus females.
Genetic structuring in the population appears to arise from the joint effects of multiple factors, including small effective subpopulation sizes, a fragmented lacustrine habitat, and behavioural dispersal limitation. The fine-scale differentiation found in the landlocked Saimaa ringed seal is especially surprising when contrasted with marine ringed seals, which often exhibit near-panmixia among subpopulations separated by hundreds or even thousands of kilometres. Our results demonstrate that population structures of endangered animals cannot be predicted based on data on even closely related species or subspecies.
Notes
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 2001 May;86(Pt 5):609-1711554977
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2006 May;15(6):1561-7616629811
Cites: Genetics. 2003 Mar;163(3):1177-9112663554
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2003 Jun;12(6):1577-8812755885
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2004 Jan 22;20(2):289-9014734327
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2004 Apr;13(4):921-3515012766
Cites: J Hered. 2004 Jul-Aug;95(4):291-30015247308
Cites: Science. 1987 May 15;236(4803):787-923576198
Cites: Genetics. 1989 Feb;121(2):379-912731727
Cites: Genetics. 1992 Jun;131(2):479-911644282
Cites: Nat Genet. 1995 Dec;11(4):360-27493011
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1995 Dec;4(6):653-628564005
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 1996 Apr;76 ( Pt 4):377-838626222
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1996 Feb;5(1):161-39147692
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1997 Jul;6(7):661-69226947
Cites: Anim Genet. 1997 Aug;28(4):310-19345732
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1999 Feb;8(2):299-30710065544
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2005 Apr;14(4):1241-915773950
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2005 Jul;14(8):2611-2015969739
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2011 Mar;20(6):1122-3221251112
Cites: J Evol Biol. 2011 Apr;24(4):871-8621324025
Cites: Mol Ecol Resour. 2011 Jan;11(1):5-1821429096
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2011 Apr;20(8):1601-1121366746
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2012 Sep;21(18):4472-8522882348
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2012 Oct 1;28(19):2537-922820204
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e4348223028456
Cites: J Evol Biol. 2005 Jul;18(4):750-516033545
Cites: BMC Ecol. 2014;14:2225005257
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2006 Jun;15(7):1939-5316689909
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2006 Sep;15(10):2821-3216911203
Cites: Biol Lett. 2006 Jun 22;2(2):316-917148392
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2007 Mar;24(3):621-3117150975
Cites: Oecologia. 2007 Jun;152(3):553-6717505851
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2007 Aug;24(8):1801-1017513881
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Jul 15;23(14):1801-617485429
Cites: Genetics. 2007 Oct;177(2):927-3517720927
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Jul;17(13):3078-9418494764
Cites: J Hered. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):25-3318815116
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Aug;17(15):3428-4719160474
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Sep;17(18):4015-2619238703
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2009 Mar;18(6):1088-9919226320
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2009 May;18(10):2080-3; discussion 2088-9119645078
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2009 Sep;26(9):1963-7319461114
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(5):e1067120498854
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2010 Aug;19(15):3038-5120618697
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2011 Feb;25(1):124-3221166713
Cites: Genetics. 2000 Jun;155(2):945-5910835412
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Feb 7;268(1464):325-3211217905
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2012 Dec;21(23):5689-70122934825
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2013 Feb;22(4):925-4623279006
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jul 7;280(1762):2013049623677341
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2013 Sep;22(17):4483-9823889682
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(10):e7712524130843
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2013 Nov;22(22):5503-1524128177
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Oct 7;268(1480):2021-711571049
PubMed ID
25005257 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climatic change as an engine for speciation in flightless Orthoptera species inhabiting African mountains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95455
Source
Mol Ecol. 2009 Jan;18(1):93-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Voje Kjetil Lysne
Hemp Claudia
Flagstad Øystein
Saetre Glenn-Peter
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Mol Ecol. 2009 Jan;18(1):93-108
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa, Eastern
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Climate
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Ecosystem
Evolution, Molecular
Gene Flow
Genetic Speciation
Geography
Models, Genetic
Orthoptera - classification - genetics
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Species Specificity
Abstract
Many East African mountains are characterized by an exceptionally high biodiversity. Here we assess the hypothesis that climatic fluctuations during the Plio-Pleistocene led to ecological fragmentation with subsequent genetic isolation and speciation in forest habitats in East Africa. Hypotheses on speciation in savannah lineages are also investigated. To do this, mitochondrial DNA sequences from a group of bush crickets consisting of both forest and savannah inhabiting taxa were analysed in relation to Plio-Pleistocene range fragmentations indicated by palaeoclimatic studies. Coalescent modelling and mismatch distributions were used to distinguish between alternative biogeographical scenarios. The results indicate two radiations: the earliest one overlaps in time with the global spread of C4 grasslands and only grassland inhabiting lineages originated in this radiation. Climatically induced retraction of forest to higher altitudes about 0.8 million years ago, promoting vicariant speciation in species inhabiting the montane zone, can explain the second radiation. Although much of the biodiversity in East Africa is presently threatened by climate change, past climatic fluctuations appear to have contributed to the species richness observed in the East African hot spots. Perceiving forests as centres of speciation reinforces the importance of conserving the remaining forest patches in the region.
PubMed ID
19140967 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coalescent simulations of Yakut mtDNA variation suggest small founding population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152465
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2009 Aug;139(4):474-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Mark Zlojutro
Larissa A Tarskaia
Mark Sorensen
J Josh Snodgrass
William R Leonard
Michael H Crawford
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX 78227, USA. markz@sfbrgenetics.org
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2009 Aug;139(4):474-82
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Computer simulation
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Founder Effect
Gene Flow - genetics
Genetic Variation
Humans
Models, Genetic
Molecular Sequence Data
Population Density
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia
Abstract
The Yakuts are a Turkic-speaking population from northeastern Siberia who are believed to have originated from ancient Turkic populations in South Siberia, based on archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence. In order to better understand Yakut origins, we modeled 25 demographic scenarios and tested by coalescent simulation whether any are consistent with the patterns of mtDNA diversity observed in present-day Yakuts. The models consist of either two simulated demes that represent Yakuts and a South Siberian ancestral population, or three demes that also include a regional Northeast Siberian population that served as a source of local gene flow into the Yakut deme. The model that produced the best fit to the observed data defined a founder group with an effective female population size of only 150 individuals that migrated northwards approximately 1,000 years BP and who experienced significant admixture with neighboring populations in Northeastern Siberia. These simulation results indicate a pronounced founder effect that was primarily kin-structured and reconcile reported discrepancies between Yakut mtDNA and Y chromosome diversity levels.
PubMed ID
19235790 View in PubMed
Less detail

The complete mitochondrial genome of Baikalian amphipoda Eulimnogammarus vittatus Dybowsky, 1874.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289355
Source
Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal. 2016 05; 27(3):1795-7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2016
Author
Elena V Romanova
Kirill V Mikhailov
Maria D Logacheva
Ravil M Kamaltynov
Vladimir V Aleoshin
Dmitry Yu Sherbakov
Author Affiliation
a Laboratory of Molecular Systematics, Limnological Institute, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences , Irkutsk , Russia .
Source
Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal. 2016 05; 27(3):1795-7
Date
05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Amphipoda - genetics
Animals
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Genome, Mitochondrial - genetics
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
RNA, Ribosomal - genetics
RNA, Transfer - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
A complete mitochondrial genome sequence of amphipoda Eulimnogammarus vittatus Dybowsky, 1874 from Lake Baikal was obtained using next-generation sequencing approach. Mitochondrial DNA with the length of 15,534?bp contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 23 transfer RNA and non-coding sequences: a putative control region and 7 intergenic spacers. A brief comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes of E. vittatus and its sister species Eulimnogammarus verrucosus was performed.
PubMed ID
25264843 View in PubMed
Less detail

67 records – page 1 of 7.