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Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145606
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Camilla F Speller
Brian M Kemp
Scott D Wyatt
Cara Monroe
William D Lipe
Ursula M Arndt
Dongya Y Yang
Author Affiliation
Ancient DNA Laboratory, Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - genetics
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Breeding - methods
Cluster analysis
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Demography
Feces - chemistry
Fossils
Founder Effect
Geography
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Southwestern United States
Species Specificity
Turkeys - genetics
Abstract
Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC-AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20133614 View in PubMed
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Brief communication: Evolution of a specific O allele (O1vG542A) supports unique ancestry of Native Americans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108611
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2013 Aug;151(4):649-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Fernando A Villanea
Deborah A Bolnick
Cara Monroe
Rosita Worl
Rosemary Cambra
Alan Leventhal
Brian M Kemp
Author Affiliation
School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, USA.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2013 Aug;151(4):649-57
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Alaska
Alleles
Base Sequence
Biological Evolution
California
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Demography
Gene Flow - genetics
Genetics, Population
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1v(G542A) , which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1v(G542A) was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1v(G542A) is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene speaking groups share close ancestry with other Native American groups and support a Beringian origin of the allele, consistent with the Beringian Incubation Model. If O1v(G542A) is found in pre-Columbian populations, it would further support a Beringian origin of the allele, rather than a more recent introduction of the allele into the Americas via gene flow from one or more populations which have admixed with Native Americans over the past five centuries. We identified this allele in one Na-Dene population at a frequency of 0.11, and one ancient California population at a frequency of 0.20. Our results support a Beringian origin of O1v(G542A) , which is distributed today among all Native American groups that have been genotyped in appreciable numbers at this locus. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Na-Dene and other Native American populations primarily derive their ancestry from a single source population.
PubMed ID
23868176 View in PubMed
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Early human use of anadromous salmon in North America at 11,500 y ago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271723
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Oct 6;112(40):12344-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2015
Author
Carrin M Halffman
Ben A Potter
Holly J McKinney
Bruce P Finney
Antonia T Rodrigues
Dongya Y Yang
Brian M Kemp
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Oct 6;112(40):12344-8
Date
Oct-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Base Sequence
Carbon Isotopes
Cytochromes b - classification - genetics
DNA - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - chemistry - genetics
Fish Proteins - genetics
Fossils
Geography
Haplotypes
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Nitrogen Isotopes
Oncorhynchus keta - anatomy & histology - genetics
Phylogeny
Radiometric Dating - methods
Rivers
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Spine - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Abstract
Salmon represented a critical resource for prehistoric foragers along the North Pacific Rim, and continue to be economically and culturally important; however, the origins of salmon exploitation remain unresolved. Here we report 11,500-y-old salmon associated with a cooking hearth and human burials from the Upward Sun River Site, near the modern extreme edge of salmon habitat in central Alaska. This represents the earliest known human use of salmon in North America. Ancient DNA analyses establish the species as Oncorhynchus keta (chum salmon), and stable isotope analyses indicate anadromy, suggesting that salmon runs were established by at least the terminal Pleistocene. The early use of this resource has important implications for Paleoindian land use, economy, and expansions into northwest North America.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26392548 View in PubMed
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Genetic analysis of early holocene skeletal remains from Alaska and its implications for the settlement of the Americas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165511
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Apr;132(4):605-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Brian M Kemp
Ripan S Malhi
John McDonough
Deborah A Bolnick
Jason A Eshleman
Olga Rickards
Cristina Martinez-Labarga
John R Johnson
Joseph G Lorenz
E James Dixon
Terence E Fifield
Timothy H Heaton
Rosita Worl
David Glenn Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235-7703, USA. brian.m.kemp@vanderbilt.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Apr;132(4):605-21
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Chromosomes, Human, Y - genetics
DNA Primers
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Evolution, Molecular
Fossils
Haplotypes - genetics
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Likelihood Functions
Male
Models, Genetic
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Population Dynamics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Mitochondrial and Y-chromosome DNA were analyzed from 10,300-year-old human remains excavated from On Your Knees Cave on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska (Site 49-PET-408). This individual's mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) represents the founder haplotype of an additional subhaplogroup of haplogroup D that was brought to the Americas, demonstrating that widely held assumptions about the genetic composition of the earliest Americans are incorrect. The amount of diversity that has accumulated in the subhaplogroup over the past 10,300 years suggests that previous calibrations of the mtDNA clock may have underestimated the rate of molecular evolution. If substantiated, the dates of events based on these previous estimates are too old, which may explain the discordance between inferences based on genetic and archaeological evidence regarding the timing of the settlement of the Americas. In addition, this individual's Y-chromosome belongs to haplogroup Q-M3*, placing a minimum date of 10,300 years ago for the emergence of this haplogroup.
PubMed ID
17243155 View in PubMed
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Native American mtDNA prehistory in the American Southwest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186940
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2003 Feb;120(2):108-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Ripan S Malhi
Holly M Mortensen
Jason A Eshleman
Brian M Kemp
Joseph G Lorenz
Frederika A Kaestle
John R Johnson
Clara Gorodezky
David Glenn Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. malhi@umich.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2003 Feb;120(2):108-24
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Transposable Elements
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics - history
Emigration and Immigration - history
Extrachromosomal Inheritance - genetics
Gene Deletion
Genetic Variation - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics - history
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Southwestern United States
Abstract
This study examines the mtDNA diversity of the proposed descendants of the multiethnic Hohokam and Anasazi cultural traditions, as well as Uto-Aztecan and Southern-Athapaskan groups, to investigate hypothesized migrations associated with the Southwest region. The mtDNA haplogroups of 117 Native Americans from southwestern North America were determined. The hypervariable segment I (HVSI) portion of the control region of 53 of these individuals was sequenced, and the within-haplogroup diversity of 18 Native American populations from North, Central, and South America was analyzed. Within North America, populations in the West contain higher amounts of diversity than in other regions, probably due to a population expansion and high levels of gene flow among subpopulations in this region throughout prehistory. The distribution of haplogroups in the Southwest is structured more by archaeological tradition than by language. Yumans and Pimans exhibit substantially greater genetic diversity than the Jemez and Zuni, probably due to admixture and genetic isolation, respectively. We find no evidence of a movement of mtDNA lineages northward into the Southwest from Central Mexico, which, in combination with evidence from nuclear markers, suggests that the spread of Uto-Aztecan was facilitated by predominantly male migration. Southern Athapaskans probably experienced a bottleneck followed by extensive admixture during the migration to their current homeland in the Southwest.
PubMed ID
12541329 View in PubMed
Less detail