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Central Venous Catheters and Bloodstream Infection During Induction Therapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274958
Source
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2016 Apr;38(3):e82-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Kristin Bergmann
Henrik Hasle
Peter Asdahl
Mette M Handrup
Peder S Wehner
Steen Rosthøj
Henrik Schrøder
Source
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2016 Apr;38(3):e82-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catheter-Related Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Catheterization, Central Venous - adverse effects - instrumentation
Central Venous Catheters - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Induction Chemotherapy
Infant
Male
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - drug therapy
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to assess the risk of first-time bloodstream infection (BSI) according to type of central venous catheter (CVC) during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients eligible for our analysis were all newly diagnosed children with ALL treated at 3 pediatric centers in Denmark between 2008 and 2014. A total of 136 patients were followed from initial CVC placement until first BSI, CVC removal, death, or day 28, whichever occurred first. Thirty-nine BSIs were detected, of which 67% were gram-positive infections, and 59% met the criteria for being CVC associated. The 28-day cumulative incidence of BSI was similar in 77 patients with a nontunneled CVC (28%; 95% confidence interval, 19%-40%) and in 59 patients with a tunneled CVC with external lines (TE) (33%; 95% confidence interval, 23%-47%). Subgroup analyses showed that gram-negative blood isolates occurred more frequently in patients with a TE, and that lower incidences of BSI were detected in patients older than 9 years with a TE, and in patients with T-ALL. It is concluded that the type of CVC inserted at diagnosis has no impact upon the risk of BSI in patients with ALL undergoing induction therapy.
PubMed ID
26907653 View in PubMed
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Percutaneously placed central venous catheter-related sepsis in Canadian neonatal intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124601
Source
Am J Perinatol. 2012 Sep;29(8):629-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Jonathan Wong
Kimberly Dow
Prakesh S Shah
Wayne Andrews
Shoo Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Perinatol. 2012 Sep;29(8):629-34
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Central Venous Catheters - adverse effects
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Length of Stay
Male
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To estimate daily risk, variability between centers, and impact on outcomes of catheter-related sepsis (CRS) among preterm neonates.
Retrospective evaluation of data from centers in the Canadian Neonatal Network for neonates born at
PubMed ID
22566117 View in PubMed
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