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Absence of association between genetic variation in the LIPC gene promoter and plasma lipoproteins in three Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5558
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Sep;146(1):153-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
R A Hegele
S B Harris
J H Brunt
T K Young
A J Hanley
B. Zinman
P W Connelly
Author Affiliation
Blackburn Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medicine, London, Ont., Canada. robert.hegele@rri.on.ca
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Sep;146(1):153-60
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Arteriosclerosis - genetics
Canada
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Lipase - blood - genetics
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Liver - enzymology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Population Surveillance
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Trans-Activation (Genetics)
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
The promoter sequence variant -480T in the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) has been shown to be significantly associated with low post-heparin hepatic lipase activity. Some studies have also found that the -480T variant is associated with elevation in plasma HDL cholesterol. We tested for associations of LIPC -480T with plasma lipoprotein traits in samples taken from three distinct Canadian populations: 657 Alberta Hutterites, 328 Ontario Oji-Cree and 210 Keewatin Inuit. Plasma HL activity was not available for analyses. The LIPC -480T allele frequencies in these three groups, respectively, were 0.219, 0.527 and 0.383, and the prevalence of LIPC -480T/T homozygotes was, respectively, 0.042, 0.274 and 0.167. No significant association was found between LIPC -480T and plasma HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein AI concentration, after adjusting for covariates including gender and body mass index. There was no consistent relationship between the population mean plasma HDL cholesterol concentration and the population LIPC -480T frequency. Our findings are consistent with the idea that the common promoter variation in LIPC, which has been reported to be associated with variation in post heparin HL activity and HDL triglyceride concentration, is not always associated with variation in plasma HDL cholesterol concentration, possibly due to yet unspecified environmental or genetic factors.
PubMed ID
10487498 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and sensitivity of Parkinsonian disorder diagnoses in two Swedish national health registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125521
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2012;38(3):186-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Adina L Feldman
Anna L V Johansson
Margaret Gatz
Måns Flensburg
Giselle M Petzinger
Håkan Widner
Mark F Lew
Nancy L Pedersen
Karin Wirdefeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2012;38(3):186-93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Parkinsonian Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Swedish population-based national health registers are widely used data sources in epidemiological research. Register-based diagnoses of Parkinson's disease have not been validated against clinical information.
Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorder diagnoses were ascertained in two registers, i.e. the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Cause of Death Register (CDR). Diagnoses were validated in terms of accuracy (positive predictive value) and sensitivity against data from a population-based study of PD in 1998-2004 that screened more than 35,000 persons and identified 194 cases of parkinsonian disorders including 132 PD cases (the gold standard for the purposes of this study).
Accuracy for any parkinsonian disorder diagnoses was 88.0% in the NPR and 94.4% in the CDR. Accuracy of PD diagnoses was 70.8% in the NPR and 66.7% in the CDR. Misclassification between differential parkinsonian diagnoses was common. The accuracy of PD diagnoses in the NPR improved to 83.0% by restricting the definition to primary diagnoses only. The sensitivity of PD diagnoses in the NPR and CDR combined was 83.1%, with a mean time to detection of 6.9 years.
Population-based national health registers are valid data sources in epidemiological studies of PD or parkinsonian disorder etiology but are less suitable in studies of incidence or prevalence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22472568 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of clinical skin tumour diagnosis in a dermatological setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115148
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2013 May;93(3):305-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Ingela Ahnlide
Mats Bjellerup
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Helsingborg Hospital, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, SE-251 87 Helsingborg, Sweden. ingela.ahnlide@skane.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2013 May;93(3):305-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Child
Dermatology - methods
Dermoscopy
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Preoperative Care
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative diagnosis of skin tumours in a dermatological setting. Patients undergoing skin surgery at the Department of Dermatology without preoperative biopsy were prospectively enrolled. Preoperatively, a single clinical diagnosis was registered. The histopathological diagnosis, performed after excision, was registered as the correct diagnosis. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the clinical diagnosis were calculated. A total of 2,953 tumours were included. Altogether, 55.1% of the excised lesions were malignant. Excision margins for malignant tumours were free from tumour cells in 96.0% of cases. The sensitivity for diagnosis of malignant tumour was 98.0% and the positive predictive value was 85.3%. In line with previous studies, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were highest for basal cell carcinoma, 95.4% and 85.9%, respectively. For squamous cell carcinoma, the corresponding values were 68.0% and 67.3%, and for melanoma, 70.6% and 51.3%.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Derm Venereol. 2013 May;93(3):259-6023420414
PubMed ID
23538779 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of noninvasive stress myocardial imaging for detecting coronary artery disease in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143550
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Leonard Schwartz
Christopher B Overgaard
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. Dr.Leonard.Schwartz@uhn.on.ca
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography - standards
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Echocardiography - standards
Exercise Test - standards
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - standards
Abstract
There is a wide variation in reported accuracy ofnoninvasive stress myocardial imaging as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was undertaken to determine its current accuracy in a wide spectrum of patients with chest pain syndromes using invasive coronary angiography as the gold standard.
The patient population consisted of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography in whom noninvasive stress imaging, either nuclear or echocardiographic, was performed within 6 months prior to the angiogram. The specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values, and diagnostic accuracy for detecting > or =1 lesions with > or =50% diameter coronary stenosis were determined for each modality.
Of the 227 eligible patients, 141 were men and 86 were women; 70% had significant CAD. The diagnostic accuracy overall was 71% and was no different for nuclear or echocardiographic testing. The positive predictive value (86% vs. 52%; P = 0.002) and diagnostic accuracy (83% vs. 51%; P = 0.002) were better in men than in women.
In this study, noninvasive stress imaging lacked the accuracy of a good screening test for significant CAD. This finding was particularly true for women, for whom it was not much better than a coin toss.
PubMed ID
20469609 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of recorded asthma deaths in Denmark in a 12-months period in 1994/95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15576
Source
Respir Med. 2000 Apr;94(4):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
K E Sidenius
E P Munch
F. Madsen
P. Lange
K. Viskum
U. Søes-Petersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory medicine, Holbaek, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
Respir Med. 2000 Apr;94(4):373-7
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - classification - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Many studies of asthma mortality rely on official registration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of death certificates, where asthma was coded as cause of death. In a 12-month period, medical information on all subjects with asthma officially coded as the underlying cause of death in Denmark, was obtained by reviewing hospital records, contacting general practitioners and sometimes close relatives. A panel of four pulmonologists each examined the obtained information and independently assessed the cause of death. Of a total of 218 death certificates, 39 were excluded as the cause of death could not be validated. In 16 (9%) of the subjects death from asthma was judged to be the definite cause of death and in 12 (7%) death from asthma was possible. Of 151 non-asthma deaths coded as due to asthma, 109 were judged to have suffered or died from COPD and 14 from heart disease. The accuracy of Danish death certification in asthma deaths is poor, especially in the elderly, where COPD is often classified as asthma. We conclude that the true asthma mortality in Denmark is substantially lower than officially recorded.
PubMed ID
10845437 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of short clinical rating scales in neuropathologically diagnosed dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144936
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;18(9):810-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Lars Gustafson
Elisabet Englund
Hans Brunnström
Arne Brun
Catarina Erikson
Siegbert Warkentin
Ulla Passant
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Sweden. Lars.Gustafson@med.lu.se
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;18(9):810-20
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Brain - blood supply - pathology
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - standards - statistics & numerical data
Dementia, Vascular - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnosis
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Frontotemporal Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The overall aim was to evaluate to what extent the diagnosis of dementia subtypes, obtained by three clinical rating scales, concurred with postmortem neuropathologic (NP) diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular dementia (VaD) and mixed AD/VaD.
A prospective longitudinal clinical work-up with postmortem NP examination.
Two hundred nine patients with dementia referred for clinical evaluation and follow-up.
The diagnostic scores in a set of three short clinical rating scales for AD, FTD, and VaD were evaluated against NP diagnoses.
The sensitivity and specificity of the AD scale were 0.80 and 0.87, respectively, of the FTD scale 0.93 and 0.92, respectively, and of the Hachinski Ischemic Score (HIS, VaD diagnosis) 0.69 and 0.92, respectively. Cases with mixed AD/VaD generally presented a combination of high AD and ischemic scores. A preferred cutoff score of six was identified for both the AD and FTD scales.
All three clinical rating scales showed a high sensitivity and specificity, in close agreement with final NP diagnosis-for the HIS a moderate sensitivity. These scales may thus be considered good diagnostic tools and are recommended for clinical and research center settings.
PubMed ID
20220603 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of surgical complication rate estimation using ICD-10 codes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302167
Source
Br J Surg. 2019 02; 106(3):236-244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Date
02-2019
Author
A Storesund
A S Haugen
M Hjortås
M W Nortvedt
H Flaatten
G E Eide
M A Boermeester
N Sevdalis
E Søfteland
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Br J Surg. 2019 02; 106(3):236-244
Date
02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Coding
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Operative Time
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
The ICD-10 codes are used globally for comparison of diagnoses and complications, and are an important tool for the development of patient safety, healthcare policies and the health economy. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of verified complication rates in surgical admissions identified by ICD-10 codes and to validate these estimates against complications identified using the established Global Trigger Tool (GTT) methodology.
This was a prospective observational study of a sample of surgical admissions in two Norwegian hospitals. Complications were identified and classified by two expert GTT teams who reviewed patients' medical records. Three trained reviewers verified ICD-10 codes indicating a complication present on admission or emerging in hospital.
A total of 700 admissions were drawn randomly from 12 966 procedures. Some 519 possible complications were identified in 332 of 700 admissions (47·4 per cent) from ICD-10 codes. Verification of the ICD-10 codes against information from patients' medical records confirmed 298 as in-hospital complications in 141 of 700 admissions (20·1 per cent). Using GTT methodology, 331 complications were found in 212 of 700 admissions (30·3 per cent). Agreement between the two methods reached 83·3 per cent after verification of ICD-10 codes. The odds ratio for identifying complications using the GTT increased from 5·85 (95 per cent c.i. 4·06 to 8·44) to 25·38 (15·41 to 41·79) when ICD-10 complication codes were verified against patients' medical records.
Verified ICD-10 codes strengthen the accuracy of complication rates. Use of non-verified complication codes from administrative systems significantly overestimates in-hospital surgical complication rates.
PubMed ID
30229870 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of telemedical home blood pressure measurement in the diagnosis of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68873
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 Aug;17(8):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
D S Møller
A. Dideriksen
S. Sørensen
L D Madsen
E B Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Holstebro Hospital and Aarhus University, Holstebro, Denmark. adsj@ringamt.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 Aug;17(8):549-54
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Remote Consultation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
This study was conducted to compare the accuracy of clinic blood pressure (CBP) and telemedical home blood pressure (HBP) measurement in the diagnosis of hypertension in primary care. The study subjects were 411 patients with average CBP > or =140 mmHg systolic or > or =90 mmHg diastolic, who performed telemedical HBP measurement (5 days, four times daily) and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring in random order. Main outcome measure was the agreement of CBP and HBP with daytime ABP. CBP was much higher than daytime ABP and average HBP (P
PubMed ID
12874612 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery stroke: comparison of noncontrast CT, CT angiography source images, and CT perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158816
Source
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2008 May;29(5):931-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
K. Lin
O. Rapalino
M. Law
J S Babb
K A Siller
B K Pramanik
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. kelinmd@gmail.com
Source
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2008 May;29(5):931-6
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Cerebral Angiography - methods
Contrast Media
Female
Humans
Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is a reliable method of delineating the extent of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Our aim was to retrospectively compare the accuracy of ASPECTS on noncontrast CT, CT angiography (CTA) source images, and CT perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV) during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke.
First-time patients with MCA stroke who presented
PubMed ID
18272553 View in PubMed
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ACE gene polymorphism explains 30-40% of variability in serum ACE activity in both women and men in the population at large: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199818
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Dec;147(2):425-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999

497 records – page 1 of 50.