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Adolescents' deliberate self-harm, interpersonal stress, and the moderating effects of self-regulation: a two-wave longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134898
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2011 Apr;49(2):249-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Göran Jutengren
Margaret Kerr
Håkan Stattin
Author Affiliation
Center for Developmental Research at JPS, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden. g.jutengren@spray.se
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2011 Apr;49(2):249-64
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Bullying - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The predictive effects of peer victimization and harsh parenting on deliberate self-harm were examined. As derived from the experiential avoidance model, the study also tested whether these links were moderated by individual self-regulation approaches. Data were collected at two points in time from 880 junior high school students (mean age=13.72) in Sweden. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that Peer Victimization was predictive of self-harm. Although Harsh Parenting was not predictive of self-harm, this link was moderated by adolescents' gender. No moderating effect of self-regulation was revealed. The study concludes that the high prevalence of deliberate self-harm recently found in community samples of adolescents cannot be prevented without attending to environmental psychosocial factors.
PubMed ID
21530766 View in PubMed
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Association between deliberate self-harm and violent criminality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283453
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):615-621
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Hanna Sahlin
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Johan Bjureberg
Paul Lichtenstein
Yasmina Molero
Mina Rydell
Erik Hedman
Bo Runeson
Jussi Jokinen
Brjánn Ljótsson
Clara Hellner
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):615-621
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Individuals who self-harm may have an increased risk of aggression toward others, but this association has been insufficiently investigated. More conclusive evidence may affect assessment, treatment interventions, and clinical guidelines.
To investigate the association between nonfatal self-harm and violent crime.
This population-based longitudinal cohort study, conducted from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2013, studied all Swedish citizens born between 1982 and 1998 who were 15 years and older (N?=?1?850?252). Individuals who emigrated from Sweden before the age of 15 years (n?=?104?051) or immigrated to Sweden after the age of 13 years (ie,
PubMed ID
28384711 View in PubMed
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Associations of deliberate self-harm with loneliness, self-rated health and life satisfaction in adolescence: Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107715
Source
Pages 162-168 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):162-168
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Anna Reetta Rönkä
Anja Taanila
Markku Koiranen
Vappu Sunnari
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Women's and Gender Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Finland. anna.r.ronka@oulu.fi
Source
Pages 162-168 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):162-168
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is an act with a non-fatal outcome in which an individual initiates a behavior, such as self-cutting or burning, with the intention of inflicting harm on his or her self. Interpersonal difficulties have been shown to be a risk factor for DSH, but the association between subjective experience of loneliness and DSH have rarely been examined.
To examine the frequency of DSH or its ideation and loneliness among 16-year-olds to determine if associations exist between DSH and loneliness, loneliness-related factors, self-rated health and satisfaction with life.
The study population (n = 7,014) was taken from Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (N = 9,432). Cross-tabulations were used to describe the frequency of DSH by factors selected by gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to describe the association between DSH and loneliness and other selected factors.
Nearly 8.7% (n = 608) of adolescents reported DSH often/sometimes during the preceding 6 months, with girls (n = 488, 13.4%) reporting DSH almost 4 times than that of boys (n = 120, 3.6%). Nearly 3.2% of the adolescents (girls: n = 149, 4.1%; boys: n = 72, 2.2%) expressed that the statement I feel lonely was very/often true, and 26.4% (girls: n = 1,265, 34.8%; boys: n = 585, 17.4%) expressed that the statement was somewhat/sometimes true. Logistic regression showed that those who reported to be very/often lonely (girls: odds ratio (OR) 4.1; boys: OR 3.2), somewhat/sometimes lonely (girls: OR 2.4; boys: OR 2.4) were dissatisfied with life (girls: OR 3.3; boys: OR 3.3), felt unliked (girls: OR 2.2; boys: OR 6.0) and had moderate self-rated health (girls: OR 2.0; boys: OR 1.7), were more likely to report DSH than those without these feelings.
The results show that loneliness is associated with DSH, and that loneliness should be considered as a risk for individual health and well-being.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984286 View in PubMed
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Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276606
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Liv Mellesdal
Rolf Gjestad
Erik Johnsen
Hugo A Jørgensen
Ketil J Oedegaard
Rune A Kroken
Lars Mehlum
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (? = .21, p
Notes
Erratum In: J Trauma Stress. 2016 Feb;29(1):10626915448
PubMed ID
26581019 View in PubMed
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Cannabis use and deliberate self-harm in adolescence: a comparative analysis of associations in England and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148099
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2009;13(4):340-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ingeborg Rossow
Keith Hawton
Mette Ystgaard
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, University of Oslo and Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. ir@sirus.no
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2009;13(4):340-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Social Environment
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to test hypotheses on causality and selection regarding associations between cannabis use and deliberate self-harm (DSH) among adolescents. School surveys were conducted among 9,800 adolescents in England and Norway applying identical measures on deliberate self-harm, suicidal thoughts, cannabis use, and various potential confounders. Cannabis use was more prevalent in England than in Norway. It was associated with DHS, suicidal thoughts and various risk factors for DSH. However, these associations were stronger in Norway than in England. The adjusted associations between cannabis use and suicidal thoughts were non-significant in both countries. The adjusted cannabis-DSH association was non-significant in England but significant in Norway. Elevated risk of DSH in adolescent cannabis users seems to be mainly due to selection mechanisms. Thus the association is not likely to be direct but due to other shared contributory factors.
PubMed ID
19813111 View in PubMed
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Child maltreatment and onset of emergency department presentations for suicide-related behaviors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122952
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2012 Jun;36(6):542-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anne E Rhodes
Michael H Boyle
Jennifer Bethell
Christine Wekerle
Deborah Goodman
Lil Tonmyr
Bruce Leslie
Kelvin Lam
Ian Manion
Author Affiliation
The Suicide Studies Research Unit and Keenan Research Centre at tLi Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2012 Jun;36(6):542-51
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine whether the rates of a first presentation to the emergency department (ED) for suicide-related behavior (SRB) are higher among children/youth permanently removed from their parental home because of substantiated maltreatment than their peers. To describe the health care settings accessed by these children/youth before a first SRB presentation to help design preventive interventions.
A population-based (retrospective) cohort of 12-17-year-olds in Ontario, Canada was established. Children/youth removed from their parental home because of the above noted maltreatment (n=4683) and their population-based peers (n=1,034,546) were individually linked to administrative health care records over time to ascertain health service use and subsequent ED presentations for SRB during follow-up. Person-time incidence rates were calculated and Cox regression models used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI).
After controlling for demographic characteristics and prior health service use, maltreated children/youth were about five times more likely to have a first ED presentation for SRB compared to their peers, in both boys (HR: 5.13, 95% CI: 3.94, 6.68) and girls (HR: 5.36, 95% CI: 4.40, 6.54).
Children/youth permanently removed from their parental home because of substantiated child maltreatment are at an increased risk of a first presentation to the ED for SRB. The prevention of child maltreatment and its recurrence and the promotion of resilience after maltreatment has occurred are important avenues to study toward preventing ED SRB presentations in children/youth. Provider and system level linkages between care sectors may prevent the need for such presentations by providing ongoing environmental support.
PubMed ID
22749614 View in PubMed
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Dangerous female psychiatric patients: prevalences and characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10520
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Jan;101(1):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
O M Linaker
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Science, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Jan;101(1):67-72
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Comparative Study
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Dangerous Behavior
Female
Firesetting Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We wanted to study the prevalence and characteristics of dangerousness among female psychiatric patients. METHOD: A national survey was performed in Norway, covering all psychiatric in- and out-patient units. RESULTS: There were 329 persons reported to have a psychiatric disorder and to satisfy our criteria for dangerousness, giving a total prevalence of 9.9/100000 adults. There were 54 women, giving a female prevalence of 3.1/100 000. When compared to a matched sample of the men, fewer women were out-patients or had had jail sentences. We found no sex differences with regard to frequencies of psychosis, mental retardation, personality disorders, or drug or alcohol abuse. The women had an increased frequency of suicide-related and self-injurious behaviours and previous commitment for arson. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of women with psychiatric disorders who are considered to be dangerous was 3.1/100 000. The dangerous men did not show higher frequencies than the women for psychopathology, drug abuse, behaviour or criminality.
PubMed ID
10674952 View in PubMed
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Deliberate self-harm before psychiatric admission and risk of suicide: survival in a Danish national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114537
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Sep;48(9):1481-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Trine Madsen
Esben Agerbo
Preben B Mortensen
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, Building 13A, 2400, Copenhagen, Denmark. trine.madsen@regionh.dk
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Sep;48(9):1481-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Violence
Abstract
Psychiatric illness and deliberate self-harm (DSH) are major risk factors of suicide. In largely 15% of psychiatric admissions in Denmark, the patient had an episode of DSH within the last year before admission. This study examined the survival and predictors of suicide in a suicidal high-risk cohort consisting of hospitalized psychiatric patients with recent DSH.
This national prospective register-based study examined all hospitalized psychiatric patients who self-harmed within a year before admission. All admitted patients, in the time period 1998-2006, were followed and survival analyses techniques were used to identify predictors of suicide.
The study population consisted of 17,257 patients; 520 (3%) died by suicide during follow-up; 50% of the suicides occurred within a year from the index admission. A rate of 1,645 suicides per 100,000 person-years in the first year after psychiatric admission was found. Adjusted analyses showed that a higher degree of education, having DSH within a month before psychiatric admission and contact with a private psychiatrist increased the risk of suicide.
Psychiatric hospitalized patients with recent DSH revealed high suicide rates, even during hospitalization. When discharging psychiatric patients with recent DSH careful arrangement of follow-up treatment in the outpatient setting is recommendable.
PubMed ID
23609375 View in PubMed
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Deliberate self-harm in 14-year-old adolescents: how frequent is it, and how is it associated with psychopathology, relationship variables, and styles of emotional regulation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158119
Source
Cogn Behav Ther. 2008;37(1):26-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jonas Bjärehed
Lars-Gunnar Lundh
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden. Jonas.Bjarehed@psychology.lu.se
Source
Cogn Behav Ther. 2008;37(1):26-37
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self Concept
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Deliberate self-harm was studied in 14-year-old adolescents from four schools in southern Sweden with a test-retest design, using a nine-item version of the Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory. At Time 1, 40.2% of the adolescents indicated deliberate self-harm on at least one occasion compared with 36.5% at Time 2. Test-retest data showed high stability over periods of up to 2 months in duration. Cross-validation of the results from Time 1 to Time 2 showed robust correlations between deliberate self-harm and general psychopathology, a relative absence of positive feelings toward parents, and a ruminative style of emotional regulation. Further, rumination/negative thinking and a relative absence of positive feelings toward parents were predictors of self-harm independently of general psychopathology. In addition, deliberate self-harm correlated with symptoms of eating disorder and negative body esteem in girls.
PubMed ID
18365796 View in PubMed
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Deliberate self-harm in 15-year-old adolescents: a pilot study with a modified version of the Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165460
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Feb;48(1):33-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Lars-Gunnar Lundh
Jessica Karim
Eva Quilisch
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden. Lars-Gunnar.Lundh@psychology.lu.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Feb;48(1):33-41
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Awareness - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the rate of deliberate self-harm in 15-year-old Swedish adolescents, gender differences in this behavior, and possible associations with self-esteem and mindfulness. For this purpose, we developed a simplified version of Gratz's (2001) Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory (DSHI), and carried out a pilot study with 123 adolescents from three different schools in southern Sweden. The results showed that 65.9% of the adolescents reported having engaged in some kind of deliberate self-harm at least once; 41.5% reported at least one kind of self-harm more than once; and 13.8% reported at least one kind of deliberate self-harm behavior "many times". Although there were no overall gender differences in self-harm, the girls reported significantly more of cutting wrists, arms and other body areas than the boys. High rates of deliberate self-harm were associated with low self-esteem and low mindfulness.
PubMed ID
17257367 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.