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101 records – page 1 of 11.

Acute poisoning among children and adolescents in southern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309836
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2019 Sep 24; 139(13):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-24-2019
Author
Elisabeth Tallaksen Ulseth
Anne Freuchen
Unni Mette Stamnes Köpp
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2019 Sep 24; 139(13):
Date
Sep-24-2019
Language
Norwegian
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Aftercare
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Child
Child Guidance
Child, Preschool
Designer Drugs - poisoning
Female
Humans
Illicit Drugs - poisoning
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Poisoning - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Residence Characteristics
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicidal ideation
Abstract
Self-inflicted poisoning is common in adolescents and is a risk factor for suicide. The aim of this study was to survey the circumstances surrounding hospitalisations due to acute poisoning in patients aged up to 18 years.
All hospitalisations in the Departments of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Sørlandet Hospital Trust (Arendal and Kristiansand) due to acute poisoning in the period 1 August 2014-31 July 2015 were prospectively recorded with the aid of a form completed during the admission.
There were 88 hospitalisations distributed among 68 adolescents (mean age 15.5 years, SD 1.5) and 13 children (mean age 2.8 years, SD 2.8). The poisoning was categorised as self-harm behaviour in 32 (47 %) of the adolescents, and as substance misuse-related in 35 (52 %). In total, 37 (54 %) of the adolescents had been or were under treatment at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Fifteen (22 %) of the adolescents were deemed to be suicidal. Thirty (94 %) of the adolescents who reported self-harm as the intention behind their poisoning were offered further follow-up at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, along with 7 (20 %) of the group with substance misuse-related poisoning.
Adolescents who reported self-harm as their intention were usually offered further follow-up, whereas adolescents with substance misuse-related poisoning were rarely offered follow-up.
PubMed ID
31556525 View in PubMed
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Adolescent homicides in Finland: offence and offender characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171077
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2006 Dec 20;164(2-3):110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2006
Author
Camilla Hagelstam
Helinä Häkkänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Criminal and Forensic Psychology Research Group, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2006 Dec 20;164(2-3):110-5
Date
Dec-20-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Aged
Child
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forensic Psychiatry
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Methods
Middle Aged
Motivation
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Approximately 9% of the homicides in Finland are committed by adolescents under 20 years of age. The purpose of this study was to investigate the offence and offender characteristics in homicidal adolescents. Forensic psychiatric evaluation statements of adolescent offenders accused of a homicide during 1990-2001 were reviewed retrospectively (n=57). In 38% of the cases, there were multiple offenders. In 58% of the cases, the victim was an acquaintance, in 25% a stranger, in 12% a family member and in 5% of the cases an (ex)intimate partner. Sixty-nine percent of the offenders were intoxicated and 21% under the influence of drugs at the time of the killing. The most frequent motives were an argument (25%) and a robbery (25%). Sixty-four percent of the offenders had developmental problems and 42% had a crime history. Approximately half were diagnosed as having a conduct or a personality disorder, but 32% of the offenders were considered not to suffer from a mental illness or substance abuse. For 63%, the level of intellectual functioning was average or above average. There were signs of more than one form of violence in 54% of the cases and 28% of the cases contained excessive violence. The use of multiple and excessive violence was significantly related to the offender age, multiple offenders, offender-victim relationship and substance abuse, but not related to having developmental problems, crime history or mental illness.
PubMed ID
16426787 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' deliberate self-harm, interpersonal stress, and the moderating effects of self-regulation: a two-wave longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134898
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2011 Apr;49(2):249-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Göran Jutengren
Margaret Kerr
Håkan Stattin
Author Affiliation
Center for Developmental Research at JPS, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden. g.jutengren@spray.se
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2011 Apr;49(2):249-64
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Bullying - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The predictive effects of peer victimization and harsh parenting on deliberate self-harm were examined. As derived from the experiential avoidance model, the study also tested whether these links were moderated by individual self-regulation approaches. Data were collected at two points in time from 880 junior high school students (mean age=13.72) in Sweden. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that Peer Victimization was predictive of self-harm. Although Harsh Parenting was not predictive of self-harm, this link was moderated by adolescents' gender. No moderating effect of self-regulation was revealed. The study concludes that the high prevalence of deliberate self-harm recently found in community samples of adolescents cannot be prevented without attending to environmental psychosocial factors.
PubMed ID
21530766 View in PubMed
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Adolescents selling sex: exposure to abuse, mental health, self-harm behaviour and the need for help and support--a study of a Swedish national sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124629
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;67(2):81-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Frida Svensson
Cecilia Fredlund
Carl Göran Svedin
Gisela Priebe
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-582 25 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;67(2):81-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental disorders
Mental health
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Sex Workers - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Selling sex is not uncommon among adolescents and we need to increase our knowledge of how this affects them.
The aim of this study was to investigate adolescents who sell sex regarding sexual, mental and physical abuse, mental health as estimated by using the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 (HSCL-25), self-harm behaviour and the adolescents' experience of receiving help and support.
The study was carried out on a national representative sample of adolescents (mean age 18.3 years) in Swedish high schools in the final year of their 3-year programme. The study had 3498 participants and a response rate of 60.4%.
Of the adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had sold sexual services. The selling of sex was associated with a history of sexual, mental and physical abuse. Poorer mental health and a higher degree of self-harm behaviour were reported among the adolescents who had sold sex. Help and support was sought to a greater extent by adolescents who had sold sex but these adolescents were not as satisfied with this help and support as the other adolescents.
Adolescents that sell sex are a group especially exposed to sexual, mental and physical abuse. They have poorer mental health and engage in more self-harm behaviour than other adolescents. They are in need of more help and support than other adolescents and it is reasonable to assert that more resources, research and attention should be directed to this group to provide better help and support in the future.
PubMed ID
22563767 View in PubMed
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Age-specific suicide mortality following non-fatal self-harm: national cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269902
Source
Psychol Med. 2015 Jun;45(8):1699-707
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
D. Tidemalm
K. Beckman
M. Dahlin
M. Vaez
P. Lichtenstein
N. Långström
B. Runeson
Source
Psychol Med. 2015 Jun;45(8):1699-707
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Possible age-related differences in risk of completed suicide following non-fatal self-harm remain unexplored. We examined associations between self-harm and completed suicide across age groups of self-harming patients, and whether these associations varied by violent index method, presence of mental disorder, and repeated self-harm.
The design was a cohort study with linked national registers in Sweden. The study population comprised individuals aged ?10 years hospitalized during 1990-1999 due to non-fatal self-harm (n = 53 843; 58% females) who were followed for 9-19 years. We computed hazard ratios (HRs) across age groups (age at index self-harm episode), with time to completed suicide as outcome.
The 1-year HR for suicide among younger males (10-19 years) was 14.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.1-51.9] for violent method and 8.4 (95% CI 1.8-40.0) for mental disorder. By contrast, none of the three potential risk factors increased the 1-year risks in the youngest females. Among patients aged ?20 years, the 1-year HR for violent method was 4.6 (95% CI 3.8-5.4) for males and 10.4 (95% CI 8.3-13.0) for females. HRs for repeated self-harm during years 2-9 of follow-up were higher in 10- to 19-year-olds (males: HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.0-7.8; females: HR 3.7, 95% CI 2.1-6.5). The ?20 years age groups had higher HRs than the youngest, particularly for females and especially within 1 year.
Violent method and mental disorder increase the 1-year suicide risk in young male self-harm patients. Further, violent method increases suicide risk within 1 year in all age and gender groups except the youngest females. Repeated self-harm may increase the long-term risk more in young patients. These aspects should be accounted for in clinical suicide risk assessment.
PubMed ID
25425148 View in PubMed
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An ecologic study of parasuicide in Edmonton and Calgary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174238
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;50(5):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Stephen C Newman
Heather Stuart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton. stephen.newman@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;50(5):275-80
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Demography
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
From 1986 to 1999, the suicide rate in the Edmonton Regional Health Authority (RHA) was greater than that in the Calgary RHA (mean rate ratio 1.4). We conducted a study to determine whether a similar relation holds for parasuicide, and if so, whether the pattern can be explained at the ecologic level by sociodemographic factors.
The Edmonton and Calgary RHAs provided data on emergency department visits for nonfatal intentional self-injury for 1997. We obtained sociodemographic data from the 1996 national census for the Edmonton and Calgary census metropolitan areas (CMAs) from Statistics Canada's public-use files. In each CMA, which is nearly coterminous with the corresponding RHA, we created 10 geographic areas based on average income. We analyzed the data at the ecologic level, using linear regression and multilevel Poisson regression.
The parasuicide rate in the Edmonton CMA was greater than that in the Calgary CMA (rate ratio 1.3). In both CMAs, the parasuicide rate decreased as average income increased. In the final regression models, the only independent variables were average income, CMA, and their interaction term (linear regression model R2 = 0.82).
The parasuicide rate in the Edmonton CMA is elevated, compared with that in the Calgary CMA. At the ecologic level, much of the variation in rates can be explained by average income and CMA. The high degree of correlation among the sociodemographic variables suggests that it may not be low income per se that is affecting the parasuicide rate but, rather, the consequences of belonging to a socially disadvantaged stratum of society.
PubMed ID
15968844 View in PubMed
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[Anorexia nervosa in psychiatric units in Iceland 1983-2008, incidence of admissions, psychiatric comorbidities and mortality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138674
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Dec;96(12):747-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Anna Sigurdardottir
Sigurdur Pall Palsson
Gudlaug Thorsteinsdottir
Author Affiliation
gudlthor@landspitali.is.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Dec;96(12):747-53
Date
Dec-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - epidemiology - mortality - psychology - therapy
Body mass index
Child
Commitment of Mentally Ill - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Information is scarce concerning the incidence of anorexia nervosa (AN) in psychiatric facilities in Iceland. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of admissions, comorbidity and mortality of patients who were admitted to psychiatric units in Iceland, diagnosed with AN in 1983-2008.
The study is retrospective. 140 medical records with an AN or atypical eating disorder diagnosis according to the ICD-9 and ICD-10 were reviewed. Final sample was 84 patients with confirmed AN diagnosis.
Five men and 79 women were admitted to a psychiatric inpatient ward for the first time diagnosed with AN. Average age was 18.7 years. Incidence of admissions for both sexes in the first part of the study period (1983-1995) was 1.43/100.000 persons/year, 11-46 years old, but in the second part (1996-2008) 2.91. The increase was statistically significant (RR=2.03 95% CI 1.28-3.22) and can mainly be explained by an increased incidence of admissions to the children- and adolescent psychiatric wards (CAW). Mortality of women was 2/79 (2.5%) and standard mortality rate 6.25. The average length of stay was 97 days, 67.3 days in adult units and 129.7 days in CAW (p
Notes
Comment In: Laeknabladid. 2010 Dec;96(12):74521149869
PubMed ID
21149870 View in PubMed
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Are injuries spatially related? Join-count spatial autocorrelation for small-area injury analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153731
Source
Inj Prev. 2008 Dec;14(6):346-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
N. Bell
N. Schuurman
S M Hameed
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. njbell@sfu.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2008 Dec;14(6):346-53
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Registries
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - prevention & control
Small-Area Analysis
Social Class
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
To present a geographic information systems (GIS) method for exploring the spatial pattern of injuries and to demonstrate the utility of using this method in conjunction with classic ecological models of injury patterns.
Profiles of patients' socioeconomic status (SES) were constructed by linking their postal code of residence to the census dissemination area that encompassed its location. Data were then integrated into a GIS, enabling the analysis of neighborhood contiguity and SES on incidence of injury.
Data for this analysis (2001-2006) were obtained from the British Columbia Trauma Registry. Neighborhood SES was calculated using the Vancouver Area Neighborhood Deprivation Index. Spatial analysis was conducted using a join-count spatial autocorrelation algorithm.
Male and female patients over the age of 18 and hospitalized from severe injury (Injury Severity Score >12) resulting from an assault or intentional self-harm and included in the British Columbia Trauma Registry were analyzed.
Male patients injured by assault and who resided in adjoining census areas were observed 1.3 to 5 times more often than would be expected under a random spatial pattern. Adjoining neighborhood clustering was less visible for residential patterns of patients hospitalized with injuries sustained from self-harm. A social gradient in assault injury rates existed separately for men and neighborhood SES, but less than would be expected when stratified by age, gender, and neighborhood. No social gradient between intentional injury from self-harm and neighborhood SES was observed.
This study demonstrates the added utility of integrating GIS technology into injury prevention research. Crucial information on the associated social and environmental influences of intentional injury patterns may be under-recognized if a spatial analysis is not also conducted. The join-count spatial autocorrelation is an ideal approach for investigating the interconnectedness of injury patterns that are rare and occur in only a small percentage of the population.
PubMed ID
19074238 View in PubMed
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Asphyxial games or "the choking game": a potentially fatal risk behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152799
Source
Inj Prev. 2009 Feb;15(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
A J Macnab
M. Deevska
F. Gagnon
W G Cannon
T. Andrew
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. amacnab@cw.bc.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2009 Feb;15(1):45-9
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asphyxia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Recreation
Risk-Taking
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Texas - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of knowledge about and participation in asphyxial games, sometimes called "the choking game", and how best to raise awareness of this risk-taking behaviour and provide preventive education.
Questionnaire; collaborative research model; lay advocacy group/university researchers.
8 middle and high schools in Texas (six) and Ontario (two). A recent death from playing the choking game had occurred in one Texas school, and two other fatalities had occurred within the state.
Students in grades 4-12, aged 9-18 years.
None.
Of 2762 surveys distributed, 2504 (90.7%) were completed. The mean (SD) age of the responders was 13.7 (2.2) years. 68% of children had heard about the game, 45% knew somebody who played it, and 6.6% had tried it, 93.9% of those with someone else. Forty percent of children perceived no risk. Information that playing the game could result in death or brain damage was reported as most likely to influence behaviour. The most respected source of a preventive education message was parents for pre-adolescents (43%) or victim/victim's family (36%) for older adolescents.
Knowledge of and participation in self-asphyxial behaviour is not unusual among schoolchildren. The age of the child probably determines the best source (parents or victim/victim's family) of preventive education.
PubMed ID
19190276 View in PubMed
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Association between deliberate self-harm and violent criminality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283453
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):615-621
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Hanna Sahlin
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Johan Bjureberg
Paul Lichtenstein
Yasmina Molero
Mina Rydell
Erik Hedman
Bo Runeson
Jussi Jokinen
Brjánn Ljótsson
Clara Hellner
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):615-621
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Individuals who self-harm may have an increased risk of aggression toward others, but this association has been insufficiently investigated. More conclusive evidence may affect assessment, treatment interventions, and clinical guidelines.
To investigate the association between nonfatal self-harm and violent crime.
This population-based longitudinal cohort study, conducted from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2013, studied all Swedish citizens born between 1982 and 1998 who were 15 years and older (N?=?1?850?252). Individuals who emigrated from Sweden before the age of 15 years (n?=?104?051) or immigrated to Sweden after the age of 13 years (ie,
PubMed ID
28384711 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.