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356 records – page 1 of 36.

A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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Addiction among nurses: identification and referral.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231330
Source
AARN News Lett. 1989 Feb;45(2):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989

Addressing the needs of women living with Schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191312
Source
Can Nurse. 2001 Oct;97(9):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001

Advocacy groups for breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215572
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):829-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1995
Author
M. Waller
S. Batt
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology and Sociology, John Abbott College, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):829-33
Date
Mar-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Decision Making
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Patient Advocacy - trends
Research Support as Topic
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
Breast cancer patient advocacy groups emerged in the 1990s to support and empower women with breast cancer. Women with cancer and oncologists tend to have divergent perspectives on how breast cancer prevention should be defined and what the priorities for research should be. As their American counterparts have done, breast cancer patient advocates in Canada are seeking greater participation in decision making with respect to research. To date they have had more input into research policy decisions than into the planning of specific projects. In 1993 the National Forum on Breast Cancer recommended that women with breast cancer should have more input into the research process; breast cancer patient advocates will continue to actively pursue this objective.
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1990 Summer;6(2):33-452376805
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Nov 7;340(8828):1143-51359220
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1994;(16):139-477999456
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Winter;8(4):30-71487790
Cites: Med J Aust. 1992 Oct 19;157(8):553-51479978
PubMed ID
7697576 View in PubMed
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The Agrenska centre: a socioeconomic case study of rare diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31251
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2002;20 Suppl 3:73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Anders Olauson
Author Affiliation
Agrenska Centre for Rare Disorders, Gothenburg, Sweden. anders.olauson@agrenska.se
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2002;20 Suppl 3:73-5
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost of Illness
Disabled Children
Humans
Parent-Child Relations
Rare Diseases - economics
Respite Care - economics - psychology
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The Agrenska Centre in Gothenburg, Sweden, provides support services to children with disabilities and their families; these services include a unique programme of family activities, respite services, education, information projects, and research. Participants in their programmes have noted how their experiences at the Agrenska Centre differed from their experiences with the healthcare system in other parts of Sweden. The Department of Economics at the University of Gothenburg conducted a study to evaluate whether the benefits of the Agrenska approach might also extend to healthcare savings. There was, in fact, nearly a three-fold decrease in direct and indirect healthcare costs for families using the Agrenska Centre versus those utilising only routine support services. The implication is that society and governments can ill afford not to seek new ways to organise support networks for patients with rare disorders.
PubMed ID
12457427 View in PubMed
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AIDS: bringing the gay patient out of the closet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241826
Source
Can Doct. 1983 Jul;49(7):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983

[AIDS: this virus is ours. Interview by Gertrude Pelletier].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233118
Source
Can Nurse. 1988 May;84(5):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988

[Alcohol abusers after treatment at clinics--a follow-up study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11338
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 20;115(25):3180
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1995
Author
P. Vollset
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 20;115(25):3180
Date
Oct-20-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Self-Help Groups
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
PubMed ID
8539702 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol problems and interest in self-help: a population study of Alberta adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180639
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Mar-Apr;95(2):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
T Cameron Wild
Amanda B Roberts
John Cunningham
Donald Schopflocher
Hannah Pazderka-Robinson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies and Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB. cwild@phs.med.ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Mar-Apr;95(2):127-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Self-Help Groups
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We quantified the prevalence of alcohol problems among Alberta adults and determined relationships between sociodemographic characteristics, problem drinking status, and interest in self-help materials to reduce alcohol use.
A computer-aided telephone interview was administered to a stratified random sample of 10,014 Albertans, 18 years of age or older (5,621 women and 4,393 men; M age = 43.3 years, SD = 16.0), with a response rate of 65.4%. Measures included: 1) current drinking status, 2) prior alcohol treatment, 3) problem drinking status (using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test; AUDIT), and 4) interest in receiving free self-help materials to encourage safe drinking. Data were weighted to reflect age, sex, and regional Alberta population.
Of the total sample, 19.3% abstained from drinking in the past year, 4.2% had received treatment for alcohol problems at some point in their lives, and 80.7% were current drinkers (i.e., consumed alcohol in the previous year). Some 15.2% (n = 1,193) of current drinkers were classified as having a drinking problem. Logistic regression analyses showed that problem drinkers had 3.5 times greater odds of being male and 2.3 times greater odds of being interested in self-help interventions, compared to other current drinkers. Being single, of younger age, and not being exposed to post-secondary education also significantly predicted problem drinking status.
Alcohol misuse is common among Alberta drinkers, but many of them are interested in receiving brief public health interventions designed to help them assert control over their behaviour.
PubMed ID
15074903 View in PubMed
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An agency model for developing and coordinating psychiatric aftercare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245350
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
S J Freeman
L. Fischer
A. Sheldon
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Deinstitutionalization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Patient Advocacy
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
The development of coordinated systems for delivery of aftercare services to psychiatric patients has lagged far behind the theoretical emphasis on community maintenance. From a collaboration of 29 treatment and rehabilitation facilities, an independent agency was established to improve aftercare services in Metropolitan Toronto. Known as Community Resources Consultants, the agency was designed to facilitate and rationalize the use of existing services, to identify gaps in service, to initiate or cooperate in the development of new services, and to involve hospital and community service personnel in raising the level of expertise in the provision of aftercare. Formal and informal assessments indicate that CRC has had a positive effect on the provision of aftercare services and on professionals' level of awareness of aftercare priorities.
PubMed ID
6253385 View in PubMed
Less detail

356 records – page 1 of 36.