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619 records – page 1 of 62.

A 57-year follow-up of occlusal changes, oral health, and attitudes toward teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135775
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Rolf E Berg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Child
Dental Care - utilization
Esthetics, Dental
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Malocclusion - complications - pathology - psychology
Malocclusion, Angle Class III - etiology
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Photography, Dental
Self-Assessment
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Loss - etiology
Abstract
Very few studies have addressed long-term development and risks associated with untreated malocclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in occlusion in a lifelong perspective and to compare oral health and attitudes toward teeth among persons with malocclusion with those having normal occlusion.
In 1950 an epidemiologic survey of 2349 8-year-olds was conducted and included 4 intraoral photographs. Three selected samples with different malocclusions (deep bite, crossbite, or irregular teeth) and 1 sample with normal occlusion (a total of 183 subjects) were, 57 years later, invited for examination and an extensive interview about dental experiences and attitudes. Sixty-nine responded (38%) and constitute the subjects studied.
Malocclusion remained the same or worsened except in subjects having deep bite in childhood, which in some improved and in others became worse. Crowding generally increased. Sixteen persons reported moderate or severe temporomandular joint (TMJ) problems, and of these 7 belonged to the group with crossbite in childhood. With few exceptions, the subjects in all samples had good oral hygiene, visited the dentist regularly, and had well-preserved dentitions. Mean number of missing teeth was significantly lower among those with normal occlusion compared with the malocclusion groups. Individuals with normal occlusion responded favorably to all questions related to attitudes and experiences about their teeth, while responses in the malocclusion groups varied.
Persons with the particular malocclusions examined experienced more problems related to teeth later in life compared with those having normal occlusion in childhood.
PubMed ID
21435527 View in PubMed
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The 75-year-old persons' self-reported health conditions: a knowledge base in the field of preventive home visits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119643
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Nov;21(21-22):3170-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Helena Sherman
Christina Forsberg
Anita Karp
Lena Törnkvist
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Medicine (CeFAM), Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. helena.sherman@ki.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Nov;21(21-22):3170-82
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
House Calls
Humans
Male
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Sweden
Abstract
To describe and analyse 75-year-old persons' health conditions and how they were associated with socio-demographic status and sense of coherence to produce a knowledge base for district nurse's preventive home visits.
Action plans are needed to promote health and to prevent diseases amongst older people. One action plan is preventive home visits to 75-year-old persons by the district nurse. Though the district nurse has a broad knowledge in the field of preventive health work, preventive home visits to 75-year-old persons was a new responsibility. Although aging and older persons health have been investigated in many varied studies, it was difficult to find a comprehensive view, in general and from a district nursing perspective, of 75-year olds' health conditions.
Cross-sectional.
In total 583, 75-year-olds (74%) answered a questionnaire regarding health and well-being, health problems, health behaviour and sense of coherence.
Most 75-year-old persons reported their health as good or very good, but they also reported health problems such as: pain, sleeping problems, memory failure, fatigue, poor understanding of their own health and illnesses, problems with elimination patterns and underweight and overweight. 75-year-old persons living alone, those with elementary school education and women reported worse health and well-being than other groups.
This study contributes to the knowledge about health issues that concern persons of 75 years of age. It gives a suggestion as to what the district nurses should be aware of when performing preventive home visits.
This study raises the importance of preventive health work regarding 75-year-old persons. It suggests how to educate district nurses in how to perform preventive home visits to older persons.
PubMed ID
23083391 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of assessment of distress, anxiety, and depression by physicians and nurses in adolescents recently diagnosed with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83040
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Jun;46(7):773-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Hedström Mariann
Kreuger Anders
Ljungman Gustaf
Nygren Peter
von Essen Louise
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. mariann.hedstrom@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Jun;46(7):773-9
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Nurses
Observer Variation
Physicians
Prevalence
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sensitivity and specificity
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: As staff members prioritize medical resources for patients, it is imperative to find out whether their assessments of patients' health status agree with patients' assessments. The degree to which physicians and nurses can identify the distress, anxiety, and depression experienced by adolescents recently diagnosed with cancer was examined here. PROCEDURE: Adolescents undergoing chemotherapy (13-19 years, n = 53), physicians (n = 48), and nurses (n = 53) completed a structured telephone interview, 4-8 weeks after diagnosis or relapse, investigating disease and treatment-related distress, anxiety, and depression. RESULTS: The accuracy of staff ratings of physical distress could be considered acceptable. However, problems of a psychosocial nature, which were frequently overestimated, were difficult for staff to identify. Staff underestimated the distress caused by mucositis and worry about missing school more than they overestimated distress. These aspects were some of the most prevalent and overall worst according to the adolescents. Both physicians and nurses overestimated levels of anxiety and depression. Nurses tended to show higher sensitivity than physicians for distress related to psychosocial aspects of distress, while physicians tended to show higher accuracy than nurses for physical distress. CONCLUSIONS: Staff was reasonably accurate at identifying physical distress in adolescents recently diagnosed with cancer whereas psychosocial problems were generally poorly identified. Thus, the use of staff ratings as a "test" to guide specific support seems problematic. Considering that the accuracy of staff ratings outside a research study is probably lower, identification of and action taken on adolescent problems in relation to cancer diagnosis and treatment need to rely on direct communication.
PubMed ID
16333833 View in PubMed
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Activities of daily living and quality of life in persons with muscular dystrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52337
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Sep;33(5):206-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
B. Nätterlund
G. Ahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. birgitta.natterlund@ivo.oru.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Sep;33(5):206-11
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Disability Evaluation
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Dystrophies - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sex Factors
Statistics
Sweden
Abstract
The study concerns 77 adults with muscular dystrophy (mean age 49 years) in two counties in Sweden. The purpose was to investigate activities of daily living, quality of life and the relationship between these. Data collection was performed with "the Activity of Daily Living Staircase", "the Self-report Activity of Daily Living" and the Quality of Life Profile. The results indicated that over half of the subjects were dependent on others, chiefly in activities requiring mobility. Muscular dystrophy had mostly negative consequences, and nearly half stated that life would have offered more without it. Few significant diagnosis-related (no gender-related) differences emerged regarding activities of daily living and quality of life. Lower quality of life can only partly be explained by greater disability (r=0.30-0.54). Therefore quality of life as a measurement of rehabilitation outcomes might be based both on physical status, disability and psychosocial factors in terms of positive and negative consequences.
PubMed ID
11585151 View in PubMed
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Acupressure treatment of morning sickness in pregnancy. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63832
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Mar;19(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
A J Norheim
E J Pedersen
V. Fønnebø
L. Berge
Author Affiliation
Havnegata General Practice, Harstad, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Mar;19(1):43-7
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupressure - instrumentation - methods
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Nausea - therapy
Norway
Placebos
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Urban Population
Wrist - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To find out whether acupressure wristband can alleviate nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled study. SUBJECTS: 97 women with mean gestational length completed 8-12 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms were recorded according to intensity, duration and nature of complaints. RESULTS: 71% of women in the intervention group reported both less intensive morning sickness and reduced duration of symptoms. The same tendency was seen in the placebo group, with 59% reporting less intensity and 63% shorter duration of symptoms. However, a significance level of 5% was reached only in the case of duration of symptoms, which was reduced by 2.74 hours in the intervention group compared to 0.85 hours in the placebo group (p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Acupressure wristband might be an alternative therapy for morning sickness in early pregnancy, especially before pharmaceutical treatment is considered.
PubMed ID
11303547 View in PubMed
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Adapting and remodelling the US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' Medication Safety Self-Assessment tool for hospitals to be used to support national medication safety initiatives in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281586
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2016 Aug;24(4):262-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Ercan Celikkayalar
Minna Myllyntausta
Matthew Grissinger
Marja Airaksinen
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2016 Aug;24(4):262-70
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delphi Technique
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - prevention & control
Finland
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Patient Safety
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - standards
Pilot Projects
Risk Assessment - methods
Self-Assessment
Abstract
The US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' (ISMP) Medication Safety Self-Assessment (MSSA) tool for hospitals is a comprehensive tool for assessing safe medication practices in hospitals.
To adapt and remodel the ISMP MSSA tool for hospitals so that it can be used in individual wards in order to support long-term medication safety initiatives in Finland.
The MSSA tool was first adapted for Finnish hospital settings by a four-round (applicability, desirability and feasibility were evaluated) Delphi consensus method (14 panellists), and then remodelled by organizing the items into a new order which is consistent with the order of the ward-based pharmacotherapy plan recommended by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The adapted and remodelled tool was pilot tested in eight central hospital wards.
The original MSSA tool (231 items under ten key elements) was modified preliminarily before the Delphi rounds and 117 items were discarded, leaving 114 items for Delphi evaluation. The panel suggested 36 new items of which 23 were accepted. A total of 114 items (including 91 original and 23 new items) were accepted and remodelled under six new components that were pilot tested. The pilot test found the tool time-consuming but useful.
It was possible to adapt the ISMP's MSSA tool for another hospital setting. The modified tool can be used for a hospital pharmacy coordinated audit which supports long-term medication safety initiatives, particularly the establishment of ward-based pharmacotherapy plans as guided by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health.
PubMed ID
26811257 View in PubMed
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Adapting the US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' Medication Safety Self Assessment tool for community pharmacies in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128089
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2012 Feb;20(1):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Tuula Teinilä
Suvi Halmepuro-Jaatinen
Kirsi Yritys
Katri Manni
Marja Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2012 Feb;20(1):15-24
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Pharmacy Services - standards
Delphi Technique
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Feasibility Studies
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Pharmacists - standards
Pilot Projects
Quality of Health Care
Self-Assessment
Abstract
To adapt a US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' Medication Safety Self Assessment (MSSA) tool to, and test its usefulness in, Finnish community pharmacies.
A three-round Delphi survey was used to adapt self-assessment characteristics of the US MSSA tool to Finnish requirements, and to obtain a consensus on the feasibility and significance of these characteristics in assessing the safety of medication practices in community pharmacies. The Delphi modified self-assessment tool was piloted in 18 community pharmacies in order to refine the tool, using a questionnaire containing structured and open-ended questions.
A total of 211 self-assessment characteristics were accepted to the self-assessment tool for pilot use by expert panellists in the Delphi rounds. Most pilot users considered the tool as useful in: identifying medication safety targets for development; medication safety assessment; and identifying the strengths of medication safety. The substance of the self-assessment tool was considered as comprehensive and essential for medication safety. Most criticism was regarding: the multiplicity of self-assessment characteristics; interpretation of some characteristics; and that all the characteristics were not yet available. After the modification, according to the pilot users' comments, the final Finnish tool consisted of 230 medication safety characteristics.
The study indicated the feasibility of adapting a US medication safety self-assessment tool for use in community pharmacy practice in Finland. More efforts should be made to familiarise Finnish community pharmacists with the self-assessment tool and its benefits, and get them to use the tool as part of their long-term quality improvement.
PubMed ID
22236176 View in PubMed
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ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: quality of life assessment (QOL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79595
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patterson Marian B
Whitehouse Peter J
Edland Steven D
Sami Susie A
Sano Mary
Smyth Kathleen
Weiner Myron F
Author Affiliation
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. marian.patterson@case.edu
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Postal Service
Primary Prevention
Proxy
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Assessment (Psychology)
United States
Abstract
Information about quality of life (QOL) is valuable in evaluating pharmaceutical agents but it is not adequately assessed in many dementia drug trials. In prevention trials, following participants to conversion to AD requires QOL scales appropriate for both normal and cognitively impaired individuals. Our objective was to evaluate the utility of several scales for subject or informant QOL assessment: Quality of Life-AD; Quality of Life Activity Inventory; SF-36; SF-12 (a shortened version of the SF-36); and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Measurements were collected from 644 subject-study partner pairs, half of whom completed the instruments at the clinic and half at home. Three-month test-retest data were collected. Scales administered at home or in clinic did not differ significantly. Subject self-ratings showed a wide range for all scales. Test-retest intraclass coefficients ranged from 0.67 to 0.77. Moderately high interscale associations suggest that the scales are measuring common aspects of QOL but are not equivalent. Furthermore, they differed with respect to associations with demographic variables and QOL determinants. We conclude that the QOL scores at baseline show sufficient range and reliability to suggest they will have utility in tracking QOL through conversion to dementia.
PubMed ID
17135811 View in PubMed
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Adjusting distributions of the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 utility scores of health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186345
Source
Qual Life Res. 2003 Feb;12(1):11-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Jian Sun
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, AB, Canada. jsun@ihe.ab.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2003 Feb;12(1):11-20
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Epidemiologic Studies
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Self-Assessment
Abstract
The Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3) is a multi-dimensional, preference-based measure of health status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HUI3 scores correlate strongly with self-ratings of health status and functional disability and vary according to age, gender and occupation. In comparative studies relating to HRQoL, it is necessary to carry out adjusted comparison of the health status of the different groups. taking into account unbalanced distribution of confounding variables. This paper describes a stratification method to adjust the distributions of HUI3 scores. This method provides a graphical representation of adjusted distribution of HUI3, which can also be used to adjust other HRQoL scores. Cross-sectional data from the 1998/1999 National Population Health Survey (NPHS) in Canada were used to verify the proposed method. Male agriculture workers and male construction workers in Canada had quite different age distributions but similar HUI3 distributions. After adjusting the age distribution of the construction group to match the distribution of agriculture group, the mean HUI3 score of the former significantly decreased.
PubMed ID
12625514 View in PubMed
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619 records – page 1 of 62.