Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31 records – page 1 of 4.

Assessment of social anxiety in first episode psychosis using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety scale as a self-report measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139685
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;26(2):115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
K L Romm
J I Rossberg
A O Berg
C F Hansen
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Author Affiliation
Psychosis Research Unit, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. k.l.romm@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;26(2):115-21
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Phobic Disorders - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Self Report - standards
Social Environment
Social Isolation
Young Adult
Abstract
Social anxiety is a common problem in psychotic disorders. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating version (LSAS-SR) is a widely used instrument to capture different aspects of social anxiety, but its psychometric properties have not been tested in this patient group. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the LSAS-SR in patients with first episode psychosis, to investigate whether it differentiated between active and passive social withdrawal and to test which clinical factors contributed to current level of social anxiety.
A total of 144 first episode psychosis patients from the ongoing Thematically Organized Psychosis (TOP) study were included at the time of first treatment. Diagnoses were set according to the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-1) for DSM-IV. A factor analysis was carried out and the relationship of social anxiety to psychotic and general symptomatology measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was evaluated. Possible contributors to social anxiety were analyzed using multiple hierarchic regression analysis.
The factor analysis identified three subscales: public performance, social interaction and observation. All three subscales showed satisfactory psychometric properties, acceptable convergent and discriminate properties, and confirmed previous findings in social anxiety samples. Self-esteem explained a significant amount of the variance in social anxiety, even after adjusting for the effects of delusions, suspiciousness and depression.
The study shows that the LSAS-SR can be used in this patient group, that social anxiety is strongly related to both behavioral social avoidance and to self-esteem. The results support the use of this measure in assessment of social anxiety in both clinical settings and in research.
PubMed ID
21036553 View in PubMed
Less detail

A brief measure of core religious beliefs for use in psychiatric settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129753
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2011;41(3):253-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
David H Rosmarin
Steven Pirutinsky
Kenneth I Pargament
Author Affiliation
McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, Massachusetts 02478, USA. drosmarin@mclean.harvard.edu
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2011;41(3):253-61
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Canada
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Internet
Jews - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Religion and Psychology
Self Report - standards
Self-Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Results from several national studies in the United States suggests that: (1) religious beliefs and practices are highly prevalent; (2) spirituality and religion are statistically and clinically relevant to mental health and symptoms; and (3) many patients have a preference for spiritually integrated care. However, existing protocols that assess for salient religious themes in psychiatric settings are time-consuming to administer, relevant only to specific populations (e.g., Christians), and have poor psychometric properties. Further, evidence suggests that religious beliefs can take on a positive and negative valence, and both of these dimensions are worthy of assessment. We, therefore, developed a brief (six-item) self-report measure of positive and negative core beliefs about God which is uniquely suited for use with a broad range of religious patients. Across three studies, we evaluated its psychometric properties and ability to predict symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results provide support for the validity and reliability of our measure and further highlight the salience of both positive and negative religious beliefs to psychiatric symptoms. It is hoped that this measure will help to decrease the burden of spiritual assessment in psychiatric and medical settings, and further have research utility for this area of study.
PubMed ID
22073764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can the cardiovascular family history reported by our patients be trusted? The Norwegian Stroke in the Young Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275954
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2016 Jan;23(1):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
H. Øygarden
A. Fromm
K M Sand
G E Eide
L. Thomassen
H. Naess
U. Waje-Andreassen
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2016 Jan;23(1):154-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain ischemia - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk
Self Report - standards
Stroke - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Family history (FH) is used as a marker for inherited risk. Using FH for this purpose requires the FH to reflect true disease in the family. The aim was to analyse the concordance between young and middle-aged ischaemic stroke patients' reported FH of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with their parents' own reports.
Ischaemic stroke patients aged 15-60 years and their eligible parents were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Information of own CVD and FH of CVD was registered. Concordance between patients and parents was tested by kappa statistics, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios. Regression analyses were performed to identify patient characteristics associated with non-concordance of replies.
There was no difference in response rate between fathers and mothers (P = 0.355). Both parents responded in 57 cases. Concordance between patient and parent reports was good, with kappa values ranging from 0.57 to 0.7. The patient-reported FH yielded positive predictive values of 75% or above and negative predictive values of 90% or higher. The positive likelihood ratios (LR+) were 10 or higher and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) were generally 0.5 or lower. Interpretation regarding peripheral arterial disease was limited due to low parental prevalence. Higher age was associated with impaired concordance between patient and parent reports (odds ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.09; P = 0.020).
The FH provided by young and middle-aged stroke patients is in good concordance with parental reports. FH is an adequate proxy to assess inherited risk of CVD in young stroke patients.
PubMed ID
26293608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing children's self-report instruments for health-related quality of life using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114170
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Petersson
Rune J Simeonsson
Karin Enskar
Karina Huus
Author Affiliation
Jonkoping University, The Jonkoping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Box 1026, s-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden. christina.peterson@hhj.hj.se
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:75
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Disabled Children
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population Surveillance - methods
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Registries
Self Report - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Children with chronic conditions often experience a long treatment which can be complex and negatively impacts the child's well-being. In planning treatment and interventions for children with chronic conditions, it is important to measure health-related quality of life (HrQoL). HrQoL instruments are considered to be a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) and should be used in routine practice.
The aim of this study was to compare the content dimensions of HrQoL instruments for children's self-reports using the framework of ICF-CY.
The sample consist of six instruments for health-related quality of life for children 5 to 18 years of age, which was used in the Swedish national quality registries for children and adolescents with chronic conditions. The following instruments were included: CHQ-CF, DCGM-37, EQ-5D-Y, KIDSCREEN-52, Kid-KINDL and PedsQL 4.0. The framework of the ICF-CY was used as the basis for the comparison.
There were 290 meaningful concepts identified and linked to 88 categories in the classification ICF-CY with 29 categories of the component body functions, 48 categories of the component activities and participation and 11 categories of the component environmental factors. No concept were linked to the component body structures. The comparison revealed that the items in the HrQoL instruments corresponded primarily with the domains of activities and less with environmental factors.
In conclusion, the results confirm that ICF-CY provide a good framework for content comparisons that evaluate similarities and differences to ICF-CY categories. The results of this study revealed the need for greater consensus of content across different HrQoL instruments. To obtain a detailed description of children's HrQoL, DCGM-37 and KIDSCREEN-52 may be appropriate instruments to use that can increase the understanding of young patients' needs.
Notes
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2009;7:7719709410
Cites: Dev Neurorehabil. 2007 Jan-Mar;10(1):27-3317608324
Cites: J Pediatr. 2010 Apr;156(4):639-4420117793
Cites: Dev Neurorehabil. 2010;13(3):204-1120450470
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2010 Aug;19(6):887-9720401552
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32 Suppl 1:S125-3820843264
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:13921108796
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2008 Jun;17(5):701-1318437531
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2008 Jul;17(14):1823-3318578756
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2009 Feb;51(2):92-419191841
Cites: Dev Neurorehabil. 2009 Feb;12(1):3-1119283529
Cites: Value Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;11(4):742-6418179668
Cites: Value Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;11(4):645-5818179669
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(12):1008-1719241198
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):51-720688792
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(13-14):1230-4420958202
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(15-16):1330-921067341
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2011 Oct;20(8):1247-5821293932
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(7):581-9221981363
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 1999 Dec;16(6):605-2510724790
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2001;10(4):347-5711763247
Cites: Int J Rehabil Res. 2002 Sep;25(3):197-20612352173
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Jun 3-17;25(11-12):602-1012959334
Cites: Value Health. 2004 Jan-Feb;7(1):79-9214720133
Cites: Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Mar;11(1):5-1015132248
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2004 Sep;13(7):1309-1915473509
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 Nov;41(10):1403-98560308
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2005;3:3415904527
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2005 Jul;37(4):212-816024476
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2005 Jun;14(5):1225-3716047499
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2006 Apr;48(4):311-816542522
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2006 Oct;12(5):559-6816987118
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2006;24(12):1199-22017129075
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2007 Jun;16(5):833-5117294283
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Feb 17;303(7):623-3020159870
PubMed ID
23642162 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of pain assessment by physicians, parents and children in an outpatient setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286905
Source
Emerg Med J. 2017 Mar;34(3):138-144
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Christina Brudvik
Svein-Denis Moutte
Valborg Baste
Tone Morken
Source
Emerg Med J. 2017 Mar;34(3):138-144
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Outpatients - psychology
Pain Management - methods - standards
Pain Measurement - standards
Parents - psychology
Perception
Physicians - psychology - standards
Self Report - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Our objective was to compare pain assessments by patients, parents and physicians in children with different medical conditions, and analyse how this affected the physicians' administration of pain relief.
This cross-sectional study involved 243 children aged 3-15 years treated at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department (ED) in 2011. The child patient's pain intensity was measured using age-adapted scales while parents and physicians did independent numeric rating scale (NRS) assessments.
Physicians assessed the child's mean pain to be NRS=3.2 (SD 2.0), parents: NRS=4.8 (SD 2.2) and children: NRS=5.5 (SD 2.4). The overall child-parent agreement was moderate (Cohen's weighted ?=0.55), but low between child-physician (?=0.12) and parent-physician (?=0.17). Physicians significantly underestimated pain in all paediatric patients =3 years old and in all categories of medical conditions. However, the difference in pain assessment between child and physician was significantly lower for fractures (NRS=1.2; 95% CI 0.5 to 2.0) compared to wounds (NRS=3.4; CI 2.2 to 4.5; p=0.001), infections (NRS=3.1; CI 2.2 to 4.0; p=0.002) and soft tissue injuries (NRS=2.4; CI 1.9 to 2.9; p=0.007). The physicians' pain assessment improved with increasing levels of pain, but only 42.1% of children with severe pain (NRS=7) received pain relief.
Paediatric pain was significantly underestimated by ED physicians. In the absence of a self-report from the child, parents' evaluation should be listened to. Despite improved pain assessments in children with fractures and when pain was perceived to be severe, it is worrying that barely half of the children with severe pain received analgesics in the ED.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Jan 2;387(10013):83-9226095580
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2005 Jun 1;30(11):1331-415928561
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 1989 Aug;36(4):795-8222569180
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2007 Jul;105(1):205-2117578977
Cites: Pediatrics. 2012 Nov;130(5):e1391-40523109683
Cites: Injury. 2000 Dec;31(10):761-711154744
Cites: Pediatr Emerg Care. 2002 Jun;18(3):159-6212065998
Cites: J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Apr;45(4):199-20319426378
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2003 Aug;42(2):197-20512883507
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2007 May;14(5):479-8217363765
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2002 Jun;9(6):609-1212045074
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2014 Apr;103(4):e173-524533818
Cites: BMC Emerg Med. 2015 Nov 06;15:3326546172
Cites: J Pain. 2010 Feb;11(2):101-819962352
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 2006 Nov;24(7):806-917098101
Cites: Pain. 2006 Nov;125(1-2):143-5716777328
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998 Feb;152(2):147-99491040
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74843571
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2011 Jun;41(6):1073-9321621130
Cites: Child Care Health Dev. 2012 Mar;38(2):186-9521651605
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Aug 25;331(8):541-48041423
PubMed ID
27797872 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of reliability and responsiveness of patient-reported clinical outcome measures in knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126298
Source
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Aug;42(8):716-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Valerie J Williams
Sara R Piva
James J Irrgang
Chad Crossley
G Kelley Fitzgerald
Author Affiliation
Centers for Rehab Services, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Source
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Aug;42(8):716-23
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoarthritis, Knee - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report - standards
Abstract
Secondary analysis, pretreatment-posttreatment observational study.
To compare the reliability and responsiveness of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Knee Outcome Survey activities of daily living subscale (KOS-ADL), and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA).
The WOMAC is the current standard in patient-reported measures of function in patients with knee OA. The KOS-ADL and LEFS were designed for potential use in patients with knee OA. If the KOS-ADL and LEFS are to be considered viable alternatives to the WOMAC for measuring patient-reported function in individuals with knee OA, they should have measurement properties comparable to the WOMAC. It would also be important to determine whether either of these instruments may be superior to the WOMAC in terms of reliability or responsiveness in this population.
Data from 168 subjects with knee OA, who participated in a rehabilitation program, were used in the analyses. Reliability and responsiveness of each outcome measure were estimated at follow-ups of 2, 6, and 12 months. Reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1) for subjects who were unchanged in status from baseline at each follow-up time, based on a global rating of change score. To examine responsiveness, the standard error of the measurement, minimal detectable change, minimal clinically important difference, and the Guyatt responsiveness index were calculated for each outcome measure at each follow-up time.
All 3 outcome measures demonstrated reasonable reliability and responsiveness to change. Reliability and responsiveness tended to decrease somewhat with increasing follow-up time. There were no substantial differences between outcome measures for reliability or any of the 3 measures of responsiveness at any follow-up time.
The results do not indicate that one outcome measure is more reliable or responsive than another when applied to subjects with knee OA. We believe that all 3 instruments are appropriate outcome measures to examine change in functional status of patients with knee OA.
Notes
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1986 Aug;29(8):1039-493741515
Cites: Phys Ther. 2011 Apr;91(4):452-6921330451
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Dec;15(12):1833-403068365
Cites: Control Clin Trials. 1989 Dec;10(4):407-152691207
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2000 Feb;6(1):39-4910807023
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 May;53(5):459-6810812317
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Dec 15;25(24):3192-911124736
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2001 Oct;83-A(10):1459-6911679594
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2002 Jan;29(1):131-811824949
Cites: Clin Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;16(2):185-989093802
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1998 Aug;80(8):1132-459730122
Cites: Phys Ther. 1999 Apr;79(4):371-8310201543
Cites: Arthritis Care Res. 1999 Jun;12(3):172-910513507
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1957 Dec;16(4):494-50213498604
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;57(10):1025-3215528053
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Jan;64(1):29-3315208174
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Jan;64(1):80-415231508
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2005 Mar;35(3):136-4615839307
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Apr 1;163(7):670-516410346
Cites: J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2008 Apr;16(1):50-318453660
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2009 Feb;41(3):129-3519229444
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2009 Jun;39(6):468-7719487822
Cites: Arthritis Res Ther. 2009;11(4):R10719589168
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2010 May;38(5):891-90220044494
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(2):171-83818871
PubMed ID
22402677 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing a model for measuring fear of pain in Norwegian samples: The Fear of Pain Questionnaire Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299038
Source
Scand J Pain. 2017 10; 17:425-430
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Sara M Vambheim
Peter Solvoll Lyby
Per M Aslaksen
Magne Arve Flaten
Ole Åsli
Espen Bjørkedal
Laila M Martinussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Norway. Electronic address: sara.m.vambheim@uit.no.
Source
Scand J Pain. 2017 10; 17:425-430
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Norway
Pain - diagnosis - psychology
Pain Measurement - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Fear of pain is highly correlated with pain report and physiological measures of arousal when pain is inflicted. The Fear of Pain Questionnaire III (FPQ-III) and The Fear of Pain Questionnaire Short Form (FPQ-SF) are self-report inventories developed for assessment of fear of pain (FOP). A previous study assessed the fit of the FPQ-III and the FPQ-SF in a Norwegian non-clinical sample and proved poor fit of both models. This inspired the idea of testing the possibility of a Norwegian FOP-model.
A Norwegian FOP-model was examined by Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) in a sample of 1112 healthy volunteers. Then, the model fit of the FPQ-III, FPQ-SF and the Norwegian FOP-model (FPQ-NOR) were compared by Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Sex neutrality was explored by examining model fit, validity and reliability of the 3 models amongst male and female subgroups.
The EFA suggested either a 4-, a 5- or a 6-factor Norwegian FOP model. The eigenvalue criterion supported the suggested 6-factor model, which also explained most of the variance and was most interpretable. A CFA confirmed that the 6-factor model was better than the two 4- and 5-factor models. Furthermore, the CFA used to test the fit of the FPQ-NOR, the FPQ-III and the FPQ-SF showed that the FPQ-NOR had the best fit of the 3 models, both in the whole sample and in sex sub-groups.
A 6-factor model for explaining and measuring FOP in Norwegian samples was identified and termed the FPQ-NOR. This new model constituted six factors and 27 items, conceptualized as Minor, Severe, Injection, Fracture, Dental, and Cut Pain. The FPQ-NOR had the best fit overall and in male- and female subgroups, probably due to cross-cultural differences in FOP.
This study highlights the importance on exploratory analysis of FOP-instruments when applied to different countries or cultures. As the FPQ-III is widely used in both research and clinical settings, it is important to ensure that the models construct validity is high. Country specific validation of FOP in both clinical and non-clinical samples is recommended.
PubMed ID
29129465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early Trauma Inventory Self-Report Short Form (ETISR-SF): validation of the Swedish translation in clinical and non-clinical samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300896
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Feb; 73(2):81-89
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Niklas Hörberg
Ioannis Kouros
Lisa Ekselius
Janet Cunningham
Mimmie Willebrand
Mia Ramklint
Author Affiliation
a Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Feb; 73(2):81-89
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Psychological Trauma - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Translations
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood trauma in an important public health concern, and there is a need for brief and easily administered assessment tools. The Early Trauma Inventory (ETI) is one such instrument. The aim of this paper is to test the psychometric properties of the Swedish translation of the short, self-rated version (ETISR-SF), and to further validate the instrument.
In this cross-sectional study, 243 psychiatric patients from an open care unit in Sweden and 56 controls were recruited. Participants were interviewed and thereafter completed the ETISR-SF. Internal consistency was calculated using Cronbach's alpha, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed and goodness-of-fit was determined. Intra Class Correlation (ICC) was used to calculate test-retest reliability. Discriminant validity between groups was gauged using the Mann-Whitney U-test.
Cronbach's alpha varied between 0.55 and 0.76, with higher values in clinical samples than in controls. Of the four domains, general trauma showed a lower alpha than the other domains. The CFA confirmed the four-factor model previously seen and showed good to acceptable fit. The ICC value was 0.93, indicating good test-retest reliability. According to the Mann-Whitney U-test, the non-clinical sample differed significantly from the clinical sample, as did those with PTSD or borderline diagnosis from those without these diagnoses.
The Swedish translation of the ETISR-SF was found to have similar psychometric properties as both the original version and translations. ETISR-SF scores could also distinguish between different diagnostic groups associated with various degrees of trauma, which supports its discriminant validity.
PubMed ID
30900487 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluating the accuracy of a geographic closed-ended approach to ethnicity measurement, a practical alternative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256496
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;24(4):246-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Jessica A Omand
Sarah Carsley
Pauline B Darling
Patricia C Parkin
Catherine S Birken
Marcelo L Urquia
Marina Khovratovich
Jonathon L Maguire
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada; Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: omandj@smh.ca.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;24(4):246-53
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Censuses
Child, Preschool
Data Collection - methods
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Infant
Mothers
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report - standards
Abstract
Measuring ethnicity accurately is important for identifying ethnicity variations in disease risk. We evaluated the degree of agreement and accuracy of maternal ethnicity measured using the new standardized closed-ended geographically based ethnicity question and geographic reclassification of open-ended ethnicity questions from the Canadian census.
A prospectively designed study of respondent agreement of mothers of healthy children aged 1-5 years recruited through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network. For the primary analysis, the degree of agreement between geographic reclassification of the Canadian census maternal ethnicity variables and the new geographically based closed-ended maternal ethnicity variable completed by the same respondent was evaluated using a kappa analysis.
Eight hundred sixty-two mothers who completed both measures of ethnicity were included in the analysis. The kappa agreement statistic for the two definitions of maternal ethnicity was 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.90) indicating good agreement. Overall accuracy of the measurement was 93%. Sensitivity and specificity ranged from 83% to 100% and 96% to 100%, respectively.
The new standardized closed-ended geographically based ethnicity question represents a practical alternative to widely used open-ended ethnicity questions. It may reduce risk of misinterpretation of ethnicity by respondents, simplify analysis, and improve the accuracy of ethnicity measurement.
PubMed ID
24529516 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of the alcohol use disorders identification test and the drug use disorders identification test among patients at a Norwegian psychiatric emergency ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115049
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2013;19(5):252-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Oystein Hoel Gundersen
Jon Mordal
Anne H Berman
Jørgen G Bramness
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Department, Lovisenberg Deaconal Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2013;19(5):252-60
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Self Report - standards
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
High rates of substance use disorders (SUD) among psychiatric patients are well documented. This study explores the usefulness of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) in identifying SUD in emergency psychiatric patients. Of 287 patients admitted consecutively, 256 participants (89%) were included, and 61-64% completed the questionnaires and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), used as the reference standard. Both AUDIT and DUDIT were valid (area under the curve above 0.92) and reliable (Cronbach's alpha above 0.89) in psychotic and nonpsychotic men and women. The suitable cutoff scores for AUDIT were higher among the psychotic than nonpsychotic patients, with 12 versus 10 in men and 8 versus 5 in women. The suitable cutoff scores for DUDIT were 1 in both psychotic and nonpsychotic women, and 5 versus 1 in psychotic and nonpsychotic men, respectively. This study shows that AUDIT and DUDIT may provide precise information about emergency psychiatric patients' problematic alcohol and drug use.
PubMed ID
23548765 View in PubMed
Less detail

31 records – page 1 of 4.