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Adherence to self-care and glycaemic control among people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47709
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jun;34(6):780-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
M. Toljamo
M. Hentinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Administration, Oulu University Hospital, Box 5000 University of Oulu, FIN-90 014, Finland. maisa.toljamo@oulu.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jun;34(6):780-6
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - rehabilitation
Female
Finland
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology
Abstract
AIM OF THE STUDY: Factors associated with adherence to self-care and glycaemic control were studied in 213 people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus using a self-report questionnaire and a biochemical indicator (glycosylated haemoglobin). METHODS: The data were collected in the Oulu Health Center and the Central Hospital of Lapland in Northern Finland. The response rate was 76%. In order to verify the reliability and validity of the instruments, we used correlation coefficients, factor analysis and item-total analysis. Internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's alpha. The connections between self-care and the background variables were examined by cross-tabulation. FINDINGS: The majority of subjects accomplished their insulin treatment as scheduled, but had more difficulties with the other aspects of self-care. According to the findings, a fifth (19%) of the respondents were neglecting their self-care. The others undertook flexible (46%), regimen-adherent (16%) or self-planned self-care (19%). The subjects who were adherent to self-care had better metabolic control than those who neglected self-care. According to logistic regression analysis, poor metabolic control (P=0.003), smoking (P=0.009) and living alone (P=0.014) were associated with neglect of self-care. Gender, concurrent diseases and complications as a result of diabetes increased the risk, but had no significant association with adherence to or neglect of self-care. CONCLUSION: The findings demonstrated that adherence to self-care does not always lead to good metabolic control, but neglect of self-care is likely to lead to poor metabolic control.
PubMed ID
11422548 View in PubMed
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Adherence to self-care and social support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47594
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Sep;10(5):618-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
M. Toljamo
M. Hentinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Administration, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Finland. maisa.toljamo@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Sep;10(5):618-27
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - prevention & control - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education - standards
Peer Group
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to describe adherence to self-care, perceived difficulties and social support in a group of adult patients (n = 213) with insulin-treated diabetes from two outpatient clinics in Northern Finland. Data were collected by questionnaire. The instruments were developed to measure adherence to self-care, difficulties in self-care and social support. The response rate was 76%. One-way ANOVA, logistic regression analysis, contingency and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used in the statistical analysis. A fifth of the respondents were neglecting their self-care. The others undertook flexible, regimen-adherent or self-planned self-care. The subjects had no difficulties with insulin treatment, but had more problems with other aspects of self-care. Poor metabolic control, smoking and living alone predicted neglect of self-care, but if patients had support from family and friends, living alone was not a predictor of neglect of self-care. Those with poor metabolic control perceived themselves as getting peer support from other persons with diabetes.
PubMed ID
11822512 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perceptions of physicians, nurses, parents and friends: help or hindrance in compliance with diabetes self-care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48103
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Apr;27(4):760-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
H. Kyngäs
M. Hentinen
J H Barlow
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Apr;27(4):760-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Patient Compliance - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
Although compliance with self-care amongst adolescents with diabetes is known to be problematic, this issue has rarely been examined from the perspective of young diabetics themselves. The purpose of the study was to explore how adolescents with diabetes perceived the actions of physicians, nurses, parents and friends in relation to compliance with self-care. Fifty-one young diabetics aged from 13 to 17 responded to a questionnaire concerning compliance and were interviewed on the topic of compliance. Interview data were analysed by content analysis. The categories obtained were quantified and the relationship between compliance and the actions of physicians, nurses, parents and friends analysed by cross-tabulation. Interviews with 51 adolescents showed that the actions of physicians, nurses and parents described as motivating were associated with better compliance. Good compliance was also more evident when parental actions were perceived as accepting. Young diabetics whose friends offered silent support, or who viewed friends as irrelevant, were more likely to report good compliance. In contrast, physicians' actions described as routine/negligent, disciplined control by parents, and domination by friends were linked with poor compliance.
PubMed ID
9578206 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease feel ambivalent towards their parents' concern for them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87529
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Reichenberg Kjell
Lindfred Helene
Saalman Robert
Author Affiliation
The Nordic School of Public Health and The Vårdal Institute, Lund and Göteborg Universities, Göteborg, Sweden. kjell@reichenberg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Fear - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
This is a grounded theory study to identify concepts for describing how adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) respond to their parents' concern for them. Ten adolescent boys and seven girls were interviewed. In the analysis four main categories emerged: ambivalence, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. We found ambivalence to be the most distinctive theme to appear in the way in which these young people described how they felt about their parents' response to their disease. The core category ambivalence was expressed as an oscillation between seeking close contact with one's parents or, sometimes, staving them off, one moment feeling anxiously dependent upon them or turning to them for protection and support and the next, trying to achieve a dialogue with them. The core category comprised three subcategories, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. The clinical support for young individuals with IBD should include an awareness of the simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, reactions and emotions.
PubMed ID
18036010 View in PubMed
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An examination of stress among Aboriginal women and men with diabetes in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179442
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Yoshi Iwasaki
Judith Bartlett
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, 102 Frank Kennedy Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Mannitoba, Canada. iwasakiy@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Poverty
Self Care - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
In this study, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain an understanding of the nature of stress among Canadian Aboriginal women and men living with diabetes. Specifically, attention was given to the meanings Aboriginal peoples with diabetes attach to their lived experiences of stress, and the major sources or causes of stress in their lives. The key common themes identified are concerned not only with health-related issues (i.e. physical stress of managing diabetes, psychological stress of managing diabetes, fears about the future, suffering the complications of diabetes, and financial aspects of living with diabetes), but also with marginal economic conditions (e.g. poverty, unemployment); trauma and violence (e.g. abuse, murder, suicide, missing children, bereavement); and cultural, historical, and political aspects linked to the identity of being Aboriginal (e.g. 'deep-rooted racism', identity problems). These themes are, in fact, acknowledged not as mutually exclusive, but as intertwined. Furthermore, the findings suggest that it is important to give attention to diversity in the Aboriginal population. Specifically, Métis-specific stressors, as well as female-specific stressors, were identified. An understanding of stress experienced by Aboriginal women and men with diabetes has important implications for policy and programme planning to help eliminate or reduce at-risk stress factors, prevent stress-related illnesses, and enhance their health and life quality.
PubMed ID
15223576 View in PubMed
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An examination of the difference in performance of self-care behaviours between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery: a secondary analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138747
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Suzanne Fredericks
Joyce Lo
Sarah Ibrahim
Jennifer Leung
Author Affiliation
Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON. sfrederi@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
China - ethnology
Coronary Artery Bypass - nursing - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Compliance - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The demographic profile of the patient receiving coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Canada has changed significantly over the past 20 years from mainly white (i.e., English, Irish, Scottish) to non-white (i.e., Indian or Chinese). To support individuals who have recently undergone a CABG procedure, patient education is provided to guide performance of self-care behaviours in the home environment. The relevance of this education, when applied to the current CABG surgery population, is questionable, as it was designed and tested using a white, homogenous sample. Thus, the number and type of self-care behaviours performed by persons of Indian and Chinese origin has not been investigated. These individuals may have varying self-care needs that are not reflected in the current self-care patient education materials.
The intent of this study was to examine the difference in the type and number of self-care behaviours performed between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery.
This study is a sub-study of a descriptive, exploratory design that included a convenience sample. Ninety-nine patients were recruited, representing three cultural groups (White, Indian, and Chinese). Descriptive data were used to describe the sample and identify specific self-care behaviours performed in the home environment.
Results indicate statistically significant differences between white and non-white individuals related to use of incentive spirometer (p = 0.04), deep breathing and coughing exercises (p = 0.04), and activity modification (p
PubMed ID
21141231 View in PubMed
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An innovative self-care module for palliative care medical learners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114286
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Jun;16(6):603-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Hyon C Kim
Elaine Rapp
Ashlinder Gill
Jeff Myers
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hyon.kim@sunnybrook.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Jun;16(6):603-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Palliative Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
Palliative care is a uniquely demanding field in that clinicians routinely address the complex needs of patients living with incurable illness. Due to their relative inexperience, medical learners completing a palliative care educational experience are particularly vulnerable to the stresses that are often encountered. To address this educational need, a structured Self-Care Module was developed for medical learners rotating through a palliative care clinical rotation. Components of this module include completion of a process recording exercise, a structured reflection, and participation in a facilitated group discussion. An examination of the acceptability, utility, and operational feasibility of the module demonstrated that 86% (n=35) of learners found the module helpful in reflecting on their clinical encounters, 86% (n=35) gained an appreciation for the importance of self-reflection and self-awareness as a component of self-care and 97% (n=35) gained a greater appreciation for sharing clinical experiences with other learners. This novel Self-Care Module was found to be a well accepted, useful, and operationally feasible educational experience for postgraduate and undergraduate learners completing a palliative care educational experience.
PubMed ID
23631613 View in PubMed
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An online support group for problem drinkers: AlcoholHelpCenter.net.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160271
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):193-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
John A Cunningham
Trevor van Mierlo
Rachel Fournier
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and University of Toronto, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):193-8
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcoholism - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude to Health
Confidentiality
Empathy
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internet - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Peer Group
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Self Care - psychology
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Abstract
Social support networks have been identified as one factor that can help people resolve their problem drinking. A relatively new phenomenon is online support groups, such as the one provided on the Alcohol Help Center (AHC; http://www.alcoholhelpcenter.net). Preliminary use of the AHC support group will be summarized and lessons learned in the initial development of an online support group will be discussed.
The AHC support group can be viewed by anyone interested in its content. However, only registered users of the AHC can make postings and trained professional staff moderates all support group content. The amount and content of traffic on this support group were recorded. Qualitative analyses were conducted to identify the types of message content.
There were 674 posts on the AHC during the first 10 months of operation, including those made by the professional moderators. Content analyses of these postings identified common themes, including introductions, greetings, general supportive statements, suggested strategies, success stories, and discussion of difficulties. In addition, it appeared that the amount of traffic on the support group varied over time and clustered around nodes that consisted of one or more active users. This variation in traffic may disappear over time as overall use of the AHC support group increases.
Online support groups are developing into a new venue of support for those with drinking problems and other addictions concerns.
Consider referring clients to an online, professionally moderated, support group as another means to help problem drinkers.
PubMed ID
18022340 View in PubMed
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An open study of the effectiveness of Internet treatment for panic disorder delivered in a psychiatric setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154399
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):44-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jan Bergström
Gerhard Andersson
Andreas Karlsson
Sergej Andréewitch
Christian Rück
Per Carlbring
Nils Lindefors
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Jan.O.Bergstrom@ki.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):44-50
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Self Care - psychology
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) is common and can be treated effectively with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication or cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). However, the lack of access to CBT services has motivated the development of self-help approaches requiring less therapist contact. A novel treatment modality in this field, showing efficacy in several randomized trials but until now not evaluated within the context of regular psychiatric care, is Internet-based treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Internet-based CBT for patients in a psychiatric setting. Twenty consecutively referred patients with PD were included in the study. A structured clinical interview with a psychiatrist was conducted for inclusion, as well as at post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. The treatment consisted of a 10-week CBT-based self-help programme, including minimal therapist support by e-mail. At post-treatment, 94% of patients no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PD (82% at 6-month follow-up). The within-group effect sizes (for the main outcome PDSS; Panic Disorder Severity Scale) were Cohen's d=2.5 (pre- to post-treatment) and 2.8 (pre-treatment to follow-up), respectively. The proportion of responders on the PDSS was 75% at post-treatment and 70% at 6-month follow-up. The results supports earlier efficacy data on Internet-based CBT for PD and indicates that it is effective also within a regular psychiatric setting. However, a larger randomized controlled trial should be conducted, directly comparing Internet-based CBT with traditionally administered CBT within such a setting.
PubMed ID
18985514 View in PubMed
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Association of the severity of periodontal disease with organ complications in type 1 diabetic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48422
Source
J Periodontol. 1994 Nov;65(11):1067-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
K M Karjalainen
M L Knuuttila
K J von Dickhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Peridontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Periodontol. 1994 Nov;65(11):1067-72
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Calculus - complications
Dental Plaque - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - psychology - therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - complications
Female
Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - pathology
Periodontal Pocket - pathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Smoking
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between the severity of periodontal disease and organ complications in long-term Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients, taking account of the severity and concomitant existence of these complications. The population studied consisted of 26 Type 1 diabetics 26 to 34 years old, who had had diabetes for at least 10 years. Severity of periodontal disease was shown to increase with severity of organ complications. Patients with advanced complications had significantly more bleeding on probing, pockets > or = 4 mm deep, and more attachment loss than patients with incipient complications or no complications. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the existence of advanced complications was the only diabetes-related factor predicting pockets > or = 4 mm deep. Subgingival calculus, sex, and smoking were other significant variables. Retinopathy was the organ complication most suited to comparison, since it is usually the first to appear and can easily be classified from non-existent to severe. Differences in severity of periodontal disease were less obvious if metabolic balance alone was considered than between subgroups formed on the basis of the existence of advanced complications. Severity of periodontal disease and the existence of complications were more closely related to long-term glucose balance than single, most recent HbA1 values. Prevalence of pockets at sites with subgingival calculus increased with severity of complications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7853131 View in PubMed
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167 records – page 1 of 17.