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Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70416
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Evy Lidell
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden. hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.
PubMed ID
16526524 View in PubMed
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An educational programme for persistent life-style changes in patients with chronic renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198460
Source
EDTNA ERCA J. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Bergström
P. Bárány
I. Holm
Author Affiliation
Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm.
Source
EDTNA ERCA J. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):42-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to produce positive life-style changes in patients with chronic renal disease through a residential education programme about the medical aspects of chronic renal failure and the various treatment options in order to increase their physical capacity, emotional stability and general well-being. The programme was available to all categories of patients with chronic renal disease irrespective of treatment modality. Comparison of data pre and post course demonstrated improvements in physical activity, mental well-being and nutritional awareness.
PubMed ID
10827600 View in PubMed
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Assisting teens with asthma to take command.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81969
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Jun;20(2):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Englund Ann-Charlotte
Hartman Jan
Segesten Kerstin
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Boras University College, Boras, Sweden. lotta.englund@hb.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Jun;20(2):193-201
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Camping - psychology
Female
Helping Behavior
Humans
Laboratory Personnel - psychology
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Patient Education - methods
Personal Autonomy
Physical Therapy (Specialty)
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To meet and work with teenagers may be a challenge for caregivers as adolescence is a period when youths try to establish autonomy. Although asthma is an increasing problem worldwide, few studies have addressed professional caregivers' motives and actions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe professional caregivers' strategies in their work with teenagers with asthma. Grounded theory, inspired by Glaser, was used to uncover the phenomenon. The informants were seven professional caregivers who worked at an eight-day asthma camp for teenagers in Sweden. Participant observations and interviews were used, and the first author collected the data and participated in the activities. Findings show that professional caregivers' core concern is to assist teenagers with asthma to take command. This core concern gives rise to five strategies: showing respect, being at hand, promoting own responsibility, promoting to exceed boundaries and promoting reflections. In professional caregivers' attempt to assist teenagers to take command some differences are seen in the way they support boys and girls. One conclusion drawn from our study is that the provisional theory of 'Assisting teenagers with asthma to take command' is not only suitable for professional caregivers working at asthma camps; it may, in some degree, also be used as a source of inspiration for professional caregivers in other settings.
PubMed ID
16756525 View in PubMed
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Behavioral activation and rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157697
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2008 Mar;46(3):36-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Harold R Wallbridge
Patricia Furer
Carrie Lionberg
Author Affiliation
St. Boniface General Hospital, Manitoba, Canada wallbrid@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2008 Mar;46(3):36-44
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Avoidance Learning
Behavior Therapy - methods
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - etiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Goals
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Manitoba
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Patient Care Planning
Problem Solving
Self Care - methods - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Rehabilitation from a mental or physical disorder can become complicated when patients feel overwhelmed by symptoms and unable to make progress. Newer behavioral approaches have been developed that can help these patients. This article describes behavioral activation techniques designed to address depression.
PubMed ID
18416273 View in PubMed
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Being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout: putting one's life on hold to help.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98105
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2010 Feb;16(1):101-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Eva Ericson-Lidman
Gunilla Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Umeå SE 93187 , Sweden. eva.ericson-lidman@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2010 Feb;16(1):101-23
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Health Personnel - psychology
Helping Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Role
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Being closely connected to a person experiencing illness may be a trying experience.This study aimed to illuminate meanings of being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout. Ten interviews were conducted with five people closely connected (i.e., family members or supportive friends) to health care providers recovering from burnout. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and the resulting text was interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. One consequence of being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout is putting one's life on hold to help. In facing an almost unmanageable burden, those closely connected revealed their own suffering, emphasizing their need for support. Health care professionals need to be aware that those who are closely connected to a person experiencing burnout may lack knowledge about burnout and its related challenges. It is to be hoped such knowledge would allow significant others to better support the person experiencing burnout and promote their own health.
PubMed ID
20145287 View in PubMed
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Biopsychosocial factors associated with dyspareunia in a community sample of adolescent girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142693
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2011 Oct;40(5):877-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Tina Landry
Sophie Bergeron
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, C. P. 8888, succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada. landry.tina@courrier.uqam.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2011 Oct;40(5):877-89
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Dyspareunia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Pain Measurement - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Women's health
Abstract
Although various biopsychosocial factors have been associated with dyspareunia, research to date has focused on retrospective reports of adult women, and lack of consensus regarding etiology remains. By targeting girls at the beginning of their reproductive life, this study aimed to examine the biomedical, behavioral, and psychosocial correlates of chronic painful intercourse in sexually active adolescents compared to pain-free girls. With written informed consent, data were obtained from 1425 girls (12-19 year olds) from seven metropolitan high schools using self-report questionnaires pertaining to gynaecologic/biomedical history, physical/psychological/sexual abuse, anxiety, depression, attitudes towards sexuality, and social support. While the chronic painful intercourse (n = 51) and pain-free comparison group (n = 167) did not differ significantly on biomedical variables, painful intercourse was associated with significantly more pain during tampon insertion, and avoidance of tampons was linked to a fourfold risk of experiencing pain during sex. Cases also reported engaging in significantly more detrimental vulvar hygiene habits than pain-free girls, whereas no significant group differences were observed for self-treatment using over-the-counter antifungal preparations. Sexual abuse, fear of physical abuse, and trait anxiety were identified as significant psychosocial correlates of chronic painful intercourse. A logistic regression further identified pain during first tampon insertion and trait anxiety as statistical predictors of adolescent pain during intercourse. In addition to a possible intrinsic dysfunction in central pain processing, findings suggest that psychological variables, such as anxiety, play a significant role in painful intercourse's very first manifestations in adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
20567891 View in PubMed
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Caregiving by family and friends of adults receiving dialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171088
Source
Nephrol Nurs J. 2005 Nov-Dec;32(6):621-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather Beanlands
Martha E Horsburgh
Susan Fox
Anne Howe
Heather Locking-Cusolito
Karen Pare
Christine Thrasher
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nephrol Nurs J. 2005 Nov-Dec;32(6):621-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cost of Illness
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing - methods - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Advocacy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Renal Dialysis - methods - nursing - statistics & numerical data
Self Care - methods - psychology
Social Support
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
This study examined the activities of caregivers of adults on dialysis and explored how these behaviors evolved over time. Using a grounded theory methodology, interviews were conducted with 37 caregivers. Caregivers shared a rich repertoire of caregiving abilities and activities that were often supported by a strong knowledge base. Caregiving activities fell into in five interdependent dimensions: appraising, advocating, juggling, routinizing, and coaching. Caregivers also described specific caregiving tasks, including dialysis- related activities, management of diet, medications and symptoms, and personal care. These findings have important implications for nephrology nurses in planning care that acknowledges and supports the contributions of "lay" caregivers.
PubMed ID
16425810 View in PubMed
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Chinese immigrants' management of their cardiovascular disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163328
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Pamela LeBlanc
William Carr
Hude Quan
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Canada. kingk@ucalgary.ca
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - education - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
China - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sex Factors
Social Identification
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors have undertaken a series of grounded theory studies to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that cardiac patients undergo when faced with making behavior changes associated with reducing their cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Data were collected through audiorecorded semistructured interviews (using an interpreter as necessary), and the authors analyzed the data using constant comparative methods. The core variable that emerged through the series of studies was "meeting the challenge." Here, the authors describe the findings from a sample of Chinese immigrants (10 men, 5 women) to Canada. The process of managing CVD risk for the Chinese immigrants was characterized by their extraordinary diligence in seeking multiple sources of information to enable them to manage their health.
PubMed ID
17526869 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain and distress in older people: a cluster analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72246
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 1999 Jun;5(2):78-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M L Hall-Lord
G. Larsson
B. Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 1999 Jun;5(2):78-85
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Cluster analysis
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Chronic pain represents a major health problem among older people. The aims of the present study were to: (i) identify various profiles of pain and distress experiences among older patients; and (ii) compare whether background variables, sense of coherence, functional ability and experiences of interventions aimed at reducing pain and distress varied among the patient profiles. Interviews were carried out with 42 older patients. A cluster analysis yielded three clusters, each representing a different profile of patients. Case illustrations are provided for each profile. There were no differences between the clusters, regarding intensity and duration of pain. One profile, with subjects of advanced age, showed a decreased functional ability and favourable scores in most of the categories of pain and distress. Another profile of patients showed favourable mean scores in all categories. The third cluster of patients showed unfavourable scores in most categories of pain and distress. There appears to be a need to treat the three groups of patients in different ways in the caring situation.
PubMed ID
10633633 View in PubMed
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128 records – page 1 of 13.