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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70416
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Evy Lidell
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden. hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.
PubMed ID
16526524 View in PubMed
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Acquired brain injury self-management programme: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123842
Source
Brain Inj. 2012;26(10):1243-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Denise Kendrick
Noah D Silverberg
Susan Barlow
William C Miller
Jacqui Moffat
Author Affiliation
Vancouver General Hospital , Vancouver, BC , Canada.
Source
Brain Inj. 2012;26(10):1243-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Brain Injuries - rehabilitation
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Self Care - methods
Abstract
Traditional rehabilitation is not well suited to individuals with chronic mild symptoms following an acquired brain injury. To address this, this study adapted a supported self-management programme (SMP) for this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of this novel SMP.
Retrospective case series with repeated measures.
Fifty-three participants with chronic mild symptoms following an acquired brain injury (primarily mild traumatic brain injury) completed an SMP. The intervention involved eight coaching sessions with each an occupational therapist and psychologist, carried out in the community and based on SMP principles. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was administered at baseline, discharge and 3- and 9-month follow-up. This measure yielded scores for performance and satisfaction with daily functioning, covering the domains of self-care, productivity and leisure.
A complete case analysis of programme completers revealed that participants' ratings of their occupational performance and satisfaction improved markedly between baseline and discharge from the SMP. This set of outcome measures remained stable between discharge and the two follow-up points.
This pilot study suggests that SMPs may improve daily functioning in individuals with chronic mild ABI symptoms. More methodologically robust clinical trials are warranted.
PubMed ID
22658076 View in PubMed
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The acupuncture treatment for postmenopausal hot flushes (Acuflash) study: traditional Chinese medicine diagnoses and acupuncture points used, and their relation to the treatment response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148685
Source
Acupunct Med. 2009 Sep;27(3):101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Einar Kristian Borud
Terje Alræk
Adrian White
Sameline Grimsgaard
Author Affiliation
The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. einar.borud@uit.no
Source
Acupunct Med. 2009 Sep;27(3):101-8
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Health status
Hot Flashes - therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Postmenopause
Quality of Life
Research Design
Self Care - methods
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
the multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled Acuflash study evaluated the effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncture on postmenopausal vasomotor symptoms and health-related quality of life. It concluded that use of acupuncture in addition to self-care can contribute to a clinically relevant reduction of hot flushes and increased health-related quality of life. This article reports on the TCM syndrome diagnoses and acupuncture points used and their relation to the treatment response, and on treatment reactions and adverse events.
the acupuncture group (n = 134) received 10 acupuncture treatment sessions and advice on self-care; the control group (n = 133) received advice on self-care only. The study acupuncturists met the current membership criteria of the Norwegian Acupuncture Society, and had at least 3 years' experience of practising TCM acupuncture. They were free to diagnose and select acupuncture points for each participant, after initial discussion.
fifty per cent of the participants in the acupuncture group were diagnosed with Kidney Yin Xu as their primary TCM syndrome diagnosis. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated between the syndrome groups regarding the distribution of responders and non-responders, nor regarding the change in health-related quality of life scores. A core of common acupuncture points (SP6, HT6, KI7, KI6, CV4, LU7, LI4, and LR3) were used in all the syndromes, and in addition multiple idiosyncratic points. Core point selection and frequency of use did not differ between responders and non-responders. No serious adverse events were reported.
factors other than the TCM syndrome diagnoses and the point selection may be of importance regarding the outcome of the treatment.
PubMed ID
19734379 View in PubMed
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The Alumni program: redefining continuity of care in psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203317
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1999 Jan;37(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H. Hobbs
J H Wilson
S. Archie
Author Affiliation
McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1999 Jan;37(1):23-9
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - methods - organization & administration
Case Management - organization & administration
Chronic Disease
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods - organization & administration
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Psychiatry - organization & administration
Psychotic Disorders - rehabilitation
Self Care - methods
Sick Role
Abstract
The Alumni Program is a novel approach to the continuing care and preventive treatment of clients with "chronic" mental illness. This approach demands a different conceptualization of outpatient psychiatric intervention. The infectious disease model has been deliberately replaced with a chronic illness model that more accurately reflects the course and natural history of psychiatric illness. The Alumni Program is similar to the approach employed with other chronic medical conditions like arthritis, asthma, or diabetes. The program has complementary roles for both specialty psychiatric clinicians and family practitioners. In addition, the program empowers clients and their families to play a key role in their own ongoing adaptation and adjustment to chronic illness while striving for optimal wellness.
PubMed ID
9921462 View in PubMed
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An educational programme for persistent life-style changes in patients with chronic renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198460
Source
EDTNA ERCA J. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Bergström
P. Bárány
I. Holm
Author Affiliation
Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm.
Source
EDTNA ERCA J. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):42-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to produce positive life-style changes in patients with chronic renal disease through a residential education programme about the medical aspects of chronic renal failure and the various treatment options in order to increase their physical capacity, emotional stability and general well-being. The programme was available to all categories of patients with chronic renal disease irrespective of treatment modality. Comparison of data pre and post course demonstrated improvements in physical activity, mental well-being and nutritional awareness.
PubMed ID
10827600 View in PubMed
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Assessing capacity within a context of abuse or neglect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151676
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2009 Apr;21(2):156-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Deborah O'Connor
Margaret Isabel Hall
Martha Donnelly
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Personhood in Dementia and School of Social Work, Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. deborah.oconnor@ubc.ca
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2009 Apr;21(2):156-69
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
British Columbia
Elder Abuse - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Self Care - methods
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In 2000, with the implementation of Part III of the Adult Guardianship Act: Support and Assistance for Abused and Neglected Adults, British Columbia formally recognized the need to examine issues of decisional capacity of older adults within a context of abuse or neglect. Interestingly, however, although the test of capacity was clearly laid out under this piece of legislation, the potential influence that living in a situation of abuse or neglect may have on how the person makes decisions is not explicitly addressed. Similarly, this is a missing link throughout the literature discussing decisional capacity in older adults. This gap exists despite the fact that determining the "protection" needs of someone who is being abused and/or neglected often hinges directly on that person's decisional capacity. The purpose of this article is to examine the unique aspects associated with assessing and determining capacity for older adults who are living in a situation of abuse or neglect. The specific objectives are to: (a) examine how living in a situation of abuse or neglect may influence the determination of capacity and (b) explore the implications of conducting an assessment within a potentially abusive context. The legal notion of undue influence and the psychological concept of relational connection are introduced as potentially important for considering decision making within this context.
PubMed ID
19347716 View in PubMed
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Assisting teens with asthma to take command.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81969
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Jun;20(2):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Englund Ann-Charlotte
Hartman Jan
Segesten Kerstin
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Boras University College, Boras, Sweden. lotta.englund@hb.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Jun;20(2):193-201
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Camping - psychology
Female
Helping Behavior
Humans
Laboratory Personnel - psychology
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Patient Education - methods
Personal Autonomy
Physical Therapy (Specialty)
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To meet and work with teenagers may be a challenge for caregivers as adolescence is a period when youths try to establish autonomy. Although asthma is an increasing problem worldwide, few studies have addressed professional caregivers' motives and actions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe professional caregivers' strategies in their work with teenagers with asthma. Grounded theory, inspired by Glaser, was used to uncover the phenomenon. The informants were seven professional caregivers who worked at an eight-day asthma camp for teenagers in Sweden. Participant observations and interviews were used, and the first author collected the data and participated in the activities. Findings show that professional caregivers' core concern is to assist teenagers with asthma to take command. This core concern gives rise to five strategies: showing respect, being at hand, promoting own responsibility, promoting to exceed boundaries and promoting reflections. In professional caregivers' attempt to assist teenagers to take command some differences are seen in the way they support boys and girls. One conclusion drawn from our study is that the provisional theory of 'Assisting teenagers with asthma to take command' is not only suitable for professional caregivers working at asthma camps; it may, in some degree, also be used as a source of inspiration for professional caregivers in other settings.
PubMed ID
16756525 View in PubMed
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Becoming the best mom that I can: women's experiences of managing depression during pregnancy--a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161440
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2007;7:13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Heather A Bennett
Heather S Boon
Sarah E Romans
Paul Grootendorst
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 144 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2, Canada. heatherb@cadth.ca
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2007;7:13
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Depression - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods
Self Concept
Abstract
The purpose of this constructivist grounded theory study was to develop a theoretical model that explains women's processes of managing diagnosed depression when pregnant.
We explored the experiences of 19 women in Ontario who were diagnosed with depression during their pregnancy.
The model that emerged from the analysis was becoming the best mom that I can. Becoming the best mom that I can explains the complex process of the women's journey as they travel from the depths of despair, where the depression is perceived to threaten their pregnancy and their ability to care for the coming baby, to arrive at knowing the self and being in a better place. In order to reground the self and regain control of their lives, the women had to recognize the problem, overcome shame and embarrassment, identify an understanding healthcare provider, and consider the consequences of the depression and its management. When confronting and confining the threat of depression, the women employed strategies of overcoming barriers, gaining knowledge, and taking control. As a result of counseling, medication, or a combination of both, women felt that they had arrived at a better place.
For many women, the idea that depression could occur during pregnancy was antithetical to their vision of the pregnant self. The challenge for a pregnant woman who is diagnosed with depression, is that effective care for her may jeopardize her baby's future health. This provides a dilemma for about-to-be parents and their healthcare providers. Improved awareness of depression during pregnancy on the part of healthcare professionals is needed to improve the women's understanding of this disorder and their ability to recognize and seek help with depression should it occur during the prenatal period. Further qualitative research is needed to determine the specific aspects that need to be addressed in such classes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17848199 View in PubMed
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239 records – page 1 of 24.