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134 records – page 1 of 14.

Acceptability of home-use of misoprostol in medical abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63306
Source
Contraception. 2004 Nov;70(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Christian Fiala
Beverly Winikoff
Lotti Helström
Margareta Hellborg
Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Division for Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Contraception. 2004 Nov;70(5):387-92
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Administration
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Home-use of misoprostol would reduce the number of visits and improve access to medical abortion. We evaluated acceptance of home-use of misoprostol among women and their partners. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred women with up to 49 days of amenorrhea were given mifepristone, followed by misoprostol taken at home. RESULTS: Women chose home-use of misoprostol because it felt more natural, private and allowed the presence of a partner/friend. Two women had a vacuum aspiration due to incomplete abortion. Five unscheduled visits occurred. Ninety-six women were satisfied with their choice of home-use. The male partners were generally satisfied with their partner's choice of home-use and felt that their presence and support had been valuable. DISCUSSION: Our study shows a high acceptability among women and their partners and confirms the safety and efficacy of home-use of misoprostol. Women should be offered this choice to allow more flexibility and privacy in their abortions.
PubMed ID
15504378 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and safety of directly observed versus self-administered isoniazid preventive therapy in aboriginal peoples in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203522
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1998 Dec;2(12):979-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
G. Heal
R K Elwood
J M FitzGerald
Author Affiliation
BC Centre for Disease Control Society, Ministry of Health and Respiratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1998 Dec;2(12):979-83
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - administration & dosage
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Isoniazid - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Self Administration
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - prevention & control
Abstract
To document experience with directly observed chemoprophylaxis (DOPT) compared to self-administered isoniazid (INH) among aboriginal persons in British Columbia.
DOPT was compared to self-administered delivery (SAD) over a 3-year period. All aboriginal persons who received INH chemoprophylaxis in British Columbia between 1992 and 1994 were evaluated. Therapy completion rates and adverse outcomes associated with SAD were compared with DOPT. Treatment allocation was by patient choice.
Of 608 people who received INH prophylaxis, 443 received SAD (mean age 31.6 years) and 165 received DOPT (mean age 23.9 years). Two hundred and seventy (60.9%) SAD compared to 124 (75.2%) in the DOPT group completed 6 months of INH (P = 0.0011). The 12-month completion rates were 162/443 (36.6%) for the SAD group and 84/165 (50.9%) for the DOPT group (P = 0.0014). Adverse reactions requiring discontinuation of medication occurred in 13.5% of the patients on SAD and 9.7% of those receiving DOPT (P = 0.202). The most common reason cited for failure to complete therapy was non-cooperation in both groups. There were three deaths in the SAD group, one of which was due to suicide by self-ingestion of INH.
These data demonstrate that in aboriginal people compliance with preventive therapy can be improved by DOPT. Non random allocation to treatment groups might have influenced our findings, and further prospective randomized trials and cost-effectiveness analyses are required.
PubMed ID
9869112 View in PubMed
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Accidental methadone poisoning in children: a call for Canadian research action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142373
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2010 Aug;34(8):553-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Jennifer C Gibson
Anne Vulliamy
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2010 Aug;34(8):553-4
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Humans
Methadone - poisoning
Research
Self Administration
PubMed ID
20605632 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug events in cognitively impaired elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164367
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(6):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hooman Ganjavi
Nathan Herrmann
Paula A Rochon
Papita Sharma
Monica Lee
Daniel Cassel
Morris Freedman
Sandra E Black
Krista L Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Neuropharmacology Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(6):395-400
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - complications
Complementary Therapies - adverse effects
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Risk factors
Self Administration - adverse effects
Self Medication - adverse effects
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a frequent problem encountered in the elderly. The aim of this study was to elucidate the factors that influence ADEs in an elderly population with cognitive impairment.
242 patients were recruited from dementia clinics and assessed after 6 months for ADEs. The use of natural health products (NHPs) was also documented.
Backward logistic regression found that higher age (OR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.12), and greater cognitive impairment (OR = 0.94; 95% CI 0.90-0.98) were associated with an increased risk of developing an ADE while the use of NHPs (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 0.13-0.79) was associated with a decreased risk (chi(2) = 27.6, p
PubMed ID
17396031 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with prescription drug cost-sharing among poor and elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195424
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 24-31;285(4):421-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Tamblyn
R. Laprise
J A Hanley
M. Abrahamowicz
S. Scott
N. Mayo
J. Hurley
R. Grad
E. Latimer
R. Perreault
P. McLeod
A. Huang
P. Larochelle
L. Mallet
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital Site, Ross Pavilion, Room 4-12, 687 Pine Ave W, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1A1.
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 24-31;285(4):421-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cost Sharing - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Prescriptions - economics
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Poisson Distribution
Poverty
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec
Self Administration - economics - statistics & numerical data
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Rising costs of medications and inequities in access have sparked calls for drug policy reform in the United States and Canada. Control of drug expenditures by prescription cost-sharing for elderly persons and poor persons is a contentious issue because little is known about the health impact in these subgroups.
To determine (1) the impact of introducing prescription drug cost-sharing on use of essential and less essential drugs among elderly persons and welfare recipients and (2) rates of emergency department (ED) visits and serious adverse events associated with reductions in drug use before and after policy implementation.
Interrupted time-series analysis of data from 32 months before and 17 months after introduction of a prescription coinsurance and deductible cost-sharing policy in Quebec in 1996. Separate 10-month prepolicy control and postpolicy cohort studies were conducted to estimate the impact of the drug reform on adverse events.
A random sample of 93 950 elderly persons and 55 333 adult welfare medication recipients.
Mean daily number of essential and less essential drugs used per month, ED visits, and serious adverse events (hospitalization, nursing home admission, and mortality) before and after policy introduction.
After cost-sharing was introduced, use of essential drugs decreased by 9.12% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7%-9.6%) in elderly persons and by 14.42% (95% CI, 13.3%-15.6%) in welfare recipients; use of less essential drugs decreased by 15.14% (95% CI, 14.4%-15.9%) and 22.39% (95% CI, 20.9%-23.9%), respectively. The rate (per 10 000 person-months) of serious adverse events associated with reductions in use of essential drugs increased from 5.8 in the prepolicy control cohort to 12.6 in the postpolicy cohort in elderly persons (a net increase of 6.8 [95% CI, 5.6-8.0]) and from 14.7 to 27.6 in welfare recipients (a net increase of 12.9 [95% CI, 10.2-15.5]). Emergency department visit rates related to reductions in the use of essential drugs also increased by 14.2 (95% CI, 8.5-19.9) per 10 000 person-months in elderly persons (prepolicy control cohort, 32.9; postpolicy cohort, 47.1) and by 54.2 (95% CI, 33.5-74.8) among welfare recipients (prepolicy control cohort, 69.6; postpolicy cohort, 123.8). These increases were primarily due to an increase in the proportion of recipients who reduced their use of essential drugs. Reductions in the use of less essential drugs were not associated with an increase in risk of adverse events or ED visits.
In our study, increased cost-sharing for prescription drugs in elderly persons and welfare recipients was followed by reductions in use of essential drugs and a higher rate of serious adverse events and ED visits associated with these reductions.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2001 May 9;285(18):2328-911343477
PubMed ID
11242426 View in PubMed
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Agreement of self-reported estrogen use with prescription data: an analysis of women from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160362
Source
Menopause. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):282-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lorenzo Sandini
Kati Pentti
Marjo Tuppurainen
Heikki Kröger
Risto Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Lorenzo.Sandini@uku.fi
Source
Menopause. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):282-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Data Collection - methods
Estrogens - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Osteoporosis - drug therapy
Postal Service
Reproducibility of Results
Self Administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Self-reported data are usually used for the evaluation of the effects of hormone therapy in population studies. We examined the agreement between self-reported hormone therapy use and nationwide prescription data from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland to evaluate the accuracy of self-reports.
The 10-year questionnaire of the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Study was sent in 1999 to 12,562 women aged 57 to 67 years; 11,377 women who completed questionnaires were eligible for analysis. We asked women whether they had been taking estrogen hormone therapy as a gel, plaster, or tablet for the treatment of climacteric symptoms or osteoporosis and if the answer was yes, to specify the brand and duration of treatment for each year from 1994 to 1999.
Among the 11,377 women, 3,105 (27.3%) reported the use of an estrogen-based preparation in 1996 to 1999, and 97.6% were confirmed by Social Insurance Institution of Finland to have been prescribed hormone therapy during that time. In these women the median duration of use was 32 months (range, 1-41), according to Social Insurance Institution of Finland data. An additional 1,738 women had been prescribed hormone therapy for short periods, but those women did not report it. The duration of self-reported hormone therapy use was compared to the duration of prescriptions. A difference of 3 months or less per year was observed in 63.4% to 77.0% of women during the years 1996-1998.
A postal inquiry is a reliable method of recording long-term hormone therapy use.
PubMed ID
17998884 View in PubMed
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The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study: cancer risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127401
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Anne P Lanier
Diana G Redwood
Janet J Kelly
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S80-5
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Diet
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Status
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Self Administration
Social Marketing
Young Adult
Abstract
The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study assessed cancer risk among 3,821 Alaska Native people (AN). We present the prevalence of selected cancer risk factors and comparison with Healthy People 2010 goals. Participants completed extensive computer-assisted self-administered questionnaires on diet, physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use, cancer screening, family history of cancer, and environmental exposures. Measurement data were collected on blood pressure, height, weight, waist/hip circumference, fasting serum lipids, and glucose. Cancer risk factors are high for the Alaska EARTH study population. For all risk factors studied except for vegetable consumption, Alaska EARTH Study participants did not meet Healthy People 2010 goals. This study is unique in providing questionnaire and measurement data of cancer risk factors on a larger study sample than any previous study among AN living in Alaska. Data show that the prevalence of most cancer risk factors exceeded national recommendations. Given the disease disparities that exist for the AN population, these data provide important baseline data that can be used to target health interventions and reduce health disparities.
PubMed ID
22298198 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Nov 30;154(49):3517
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1992
Author
P. Navrbjerg
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Nov 30;154(49):3517
Date
Nov-30-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - drug therapy - etiology
Denmark
Epinephrine - administration & dosage
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Self Administration
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Sep 7;154(37):24691413168
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Sep 7;154(37):25021413176
PubMed ID
1462473 View in PubMed
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Approaches towards successful home treatment in patients with inhibitors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203421
Source
Eur J Haematol Suppl. 1998;63:11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
J. Ingerslev
H. Thykjaer
E. Scheibel
Author Affiliation
University Hospital Skejby, Department of Clinical Immunology, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Haematol Suppl. 1998;63:11-4
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies - blood
Denmark
Factor IX - immunology
Factor VIII - immunology
Factor VIIa - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
France
Hemophilia A - complications - drug therapy
Hemorrhage - drug therapy - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Recurrence
Self Administration
United States
Abstract
Significant advances have been achieved in prevention of haemophilic disability through prophylactic administration of concentrates and early administration of coagulation factors to control new bleeding episodes, but there is only limited experience with home treatment in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. A home treatment programme using recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa; NovoSeven, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) in early intervention against minor bleeds in patients with high responding inhibitors was initiated in Denmark in June 1994. Following careful education and instruction, 2-3 doses each giving 90-100 micrograms/kg bodyweight of rFVIIa were stored in each patient's home. At the onset of a new bleeding episode patients were instructed to inject 1 dose of rFVIIa, and to call the Haemophilia Centre to discuss further management of the episode. If the drug was not completely effective after 1-2 h, a second dose was injected after 3 h. Patients were further instructed to contact us the following day for final efficacy reporting. In total, 7 patients have been enrolled into the study, and to date 114 bleeding episodes have been managed at home with a mean of 2.1 doses per bleed. On 4 occasions, recurrence of bleeding was noted within 24 h. Hospital admission was required in 9 cases, because of a serious injury, insufficient compliance or, in 2 cases, because bleeding required prolonged treatment. Management of these bleeding episodes required a mean of 18 doses. We propose and discuss key criteria for selection of patients for a home treatment programme. The results of this study demonstrate that early intervention in the home setting with rFVIIa is safe and effective in the management of minor bleeding episodes in haemophilia patients with inhibitors.
PubMed ID
9882926 View in PubMed
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134 records – page 1 of 14.