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Is low selenium status a risk factor for lung cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203831
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):975-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1998
Author
P. Knekt
J. Marniemi
L. Teppo
M. Heliövaara
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):975-82
Date
Nov-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Copper - blood
Female
Ferritins - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Orosomucoid - metabolism
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Selenium - blood - deficiency
Smoking - adverse effects
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Vitamin A - blood
Vitamin E - blood
Abstract
The hypothesis that low selenium may in some circumstances be a risk factor for lung cancer was investigated in a case-control study nested within a longitudinal study. Serum samples from 9,101 cancer-free individuals were collected and stored at -20 degrees C by the Finnish Mobile Clinic in 1968-1971 and 1973-1976. During follow-up until the end of 1991, 95 cases of lung cancer were diagnosed. Selenium concentrations were determined from the serum samples of the cases and 190 controls, individually matched for sex, age, and place of residence. Mean levels of serum selenium in cases and controls were 53.2 microg/liter and 57.8 microg/liter, respectively. The relative risk of lung cancer between the highest and lowest tertiles of serum selenium, adjusted for smoking, serum alpha-tocopherol, serum cholesterol, serum copper, serum orosomucoid, and body mass index (kg/m2), was 0.41 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17-0.94). The association was stronger at lower levels (
PubMed ID
9829869 View in PubMed
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