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Does selenium supplementation affect thyroid function? Results from a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264448
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Jun;172(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Kristian Hillert Winther
Steen Joop Bonnema
Frederik Cold
Birgit Debrabant
Mads Nybo
Søren Cold
Laszlo Hegedüs
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Jun;172(6):657-67
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Dietary Supplements
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Thyroid Function Tests
Thyrotropin - blood - drug effects
Thyroxine - blood - drug effects
Time Factors
Trace Elements - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Triiodothyronine - blood - drug effects
Yeast, Dried - administration & dosage
Abstract
Selenium is present in the active site of proteins important for thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of selenium supplementation in different doses on thyroid function, under conditions of suboptimal dietary selenium intake.
The Danish PREvention of Cancer by Intervention with SElenium pilot study (DK-PRECISE) is a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 491 males and females aged 60-74 years were randomized to 100?µg (n=124), 200?µg (n=122), or 300?µg (n=119) selenium-enriched yeast or matching yeast-based placebo tablets (n=126). A total of 361 participants, equally distributed across treatment groups, completed the 5-year intervention period.
Plasma samples were analyzed for selenium and serum samples for TSH, free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) at baseline, and after 6 months, and 5 years of supplementation.
Plasma selenium concentrations increased significantly and dose-dependently in treatment groups receiving selenium (P
PubMed ID
25740851 View in PubMed
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Effect of dietary fish on plasma selenium and its relation to haemostatic changes in healthy adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62316
Source
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1987;57(4):429-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M. Thorngren
B. Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Science, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1987;57(4):429-35
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Diphosphate - pharmacology
Adult
Animals
Diet
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Fishes
Homeostasis
Humans
Male
Phosphatidylcholines - blood
Platelet Aggregation - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Sweden
Thromboxane A2 - blood
Abstract
Since fish is a food rich in selenium in Sweden, selenium status among healthy adults was studied after a change to a diet containing 150-200 g of fish per day. In two experiments the fish diet was maintained for 6 and 11 weeks. The mean increase in plasma selenium was 0.13 mumol/l (13%). Most of the increase was evident already after 3 weeks. In previous studies of the same individuals this diet caused a delay in primary haemostasis and a decrease in platelet aggregability. There was no apparent temporal relationship between the increase in plasma selenium and the increase in bleeding time and the proportion of eicosapentaenoic acid in platelet or plasma phosphatidylcholine. Further analysis is necessary to distinguish the effects of fish fatty acids and selenium on haemostatic functions.
PubMed ID
2831174 View in PubMed
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Effect of long-term selenium yeast intervention on activity and gene expression of antioxidant and xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in healthy elderly volunteers from the Danish Prevention of Cancer by Intervention by Selenium (PRECISE) pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86281
Source
Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1190-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Ravn-Haren Gitte
Krath Britta N
Overvad Kim
Cold Søren
Moesgaard Sven
Larsen Erik H
Dragsted Lars O
Author Affiliation
Department of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, Søborg 2860, Denmark. grh@food.dtu.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1190-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - metabolism
Base Sequence
Blood Platelets - enzymology
DNA Probes - genetics
Denmark
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Erythrocytes - enzymology
Female
Gene Expression
Glutathione Peroxidase - genetics - metabolism
Glutathione Reductase - genetics - metabolism
Glutathione Transferase - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Pilot Projects
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Sex Factors
Xenobiotics - metabolism
Yeast, Dried
Abstract
Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain the anti-carcinogenic effects of Se, among them altered carcinogen metabolism. We investigated the effect of Se supplementation on activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in different blood compartments, and expression of selected phase 1 and phase 2 genes in leucocytes (GPX1, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), AP-1 transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR)). Healthy elderly Danes (n 105; age 71.3 (SD 4.26) years; 36% reporting use of multivitamin/mineral supplements) participated and were supplemented daily for 5 years with placebo, 100 microg, 200 microg or 300 microg Se as Se-enriched yeast (SelenoPrecise). Blood samples were collected after 5 years of intervention. When all four groups were compared we found no effect of Se supplementation on plasma GPX or GR, on erythrocyte GPX, GR or GST, or on thrombocyte GR or GST. We found increased thrombocyte GPX activity at the two highest dosage levels in women only, but not in men. No effects on GPX1, NQO1 or AhRR gene expression were found. When all Se-supplemented groups were pooled we found significant down regulation of the expression of some phase 2 genes (GCLC, Fra1). A significant increase in AhRR gene expression with smoking was found but was independent of Se supplementation. Down regulation of phase 2 genes could increase the risk of cancer. However, further studies are needed to establish whether the observed effect in leucocytes reflects a similar expression pattern in target tissues.
PubMed ID
18062829 View in PubMed
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Effect of nationwide selenium supplementation in Finland on selenium status in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. A ten-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215737
Source
Analyst. 1995 Mar;120(3):955-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
W C Wang
V. Näntö
A L Mäkelä
P. Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Analyst. 1995 Mar;120(3):955-8
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Juvenile - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fertilizers
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Reference Values
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
A study was performed on the effect of increased selenium intake on the serum selenium level of 212 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and of 214 controls in a follow-up study during the Finnish nationwide selenium fertilization programme, which was started in 1984. The mean serum level of selenium increased from 0.90 mumol l-1 in 1985 to 1.56 mumol l-1 in 1990 in the children with JRA. The corresponding selenium levels in the controls were 0.87 mumol l-1 in 1985 and 1.33 mumol l-1 in 1990. Boys had slightly higher selenium levels in all the age groups among the patients and the controls. During the entire 10-year observation period, the patients with JRA had slightly higher mean levels of selenium than the controls. The age of the children did not have any significant effect on the selenium level in either group. The present study shows that the main factor affecting the serum level of selenium was the dietary intake of selenium both in patients and in healthy controls.
PubMed ID
7741263 View in PubMed
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Effect of selenium supplementation to fertilizers on the selenium status of the population in different parts of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232892
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1988 Jul;42(7):571-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988
Author
K. Pyykkö
R. Tuimala
R. Kroneld
M. Roos
R. Huuska
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1988 Jul;42(7):571-9
Date
Jul-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Fertilizers
Finland
Glutathione Peroxidase - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Concentrations of selenium in the soil are very low in most regions in Finland, which explains the low selenium contents of agricultural plants and the low dietary intake of selenium. The poor selenium status of the population in Finland has been considered a possible risk to public health. In 1984, it was decided to increase the selenium intake by adding selenate to common agricultural fertilizers. In this study, the selenium concentrations of whole blood and plasma, as well as erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activities, were measured in blood samples from four different localities in Finland, in 1984 and 1986, before and during the agricultural selenium supplementation. A low blood level of selenium in the inhabitants of central Finland was demonstrated in 1984. The selenium level of people from the south-west archipelago was a little higher, and that from the northern part of Finland considerably higher than the level in the rest of the country. By 1986, differences between these localities had almost disappeared, and most levels had increased. Plasma selenium concentrations were lower than those in whole blood samples; the concentrations showed a significant correlation. The glutathione peroxidase activities were at the same level in all four localities in 1984. By 1986, they had all increased to a slightly higher level. A weak correlation was found between erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity and blood selenium level.
PubMed ID
2852103 View in PubMed
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Exploration of biomarkers for total fish intake in pregnant Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98999
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Yngvar Thomassen
Dag G Ellingsen
Trond A Ydersbond
Tor-Arne Hagve
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-04030 Oslo, Norway. anne.lise.brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - administration & dosage - blood
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - analysis
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - urine
Mercury - administration & dosage - blood
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood - analysis
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few biomarkers for dietary intake of various food groups have been established. The aim of the present study was to explore whether selenium (Se), iodine, mercury (Hg) or arsenic may serve as a biomarker for total fish and seafood intake in addition to the traditionally used n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. DESIGN: Intake of fish and seafood estimated by an FFQ was compared with intake assessed by a 4 d weighed food diary and with biomarkers in blood and urine. SETTING: Validation study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). SUBJECTS: One hundred and nineteen women. RESULTS: Total fish/seafood intake (median 39 g/d) calculated with the MoBa FFQ was comparable to intake calculated by the food diary (median 30 g/d, rS = 0.37, P
Notes
RefSource: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Dec;12(12):2536-7
PubMed ID
19490733 View in PubMed
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Platelet selenium as indicator of wheat selenium intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62118
Source
J Trace Elem Electrolytes Health Dis. 1993 Sep;7(3):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
K. Bibow
H M Meltzer
H H Mundal
I T Paulsen
H. Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Trace Elem Electrolytes Health Dis. 1993 Sep;7(3):171-6
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Availability
Blood Platelets - chemistry
Blood Specimen Collection
Diet
Female
Glutathione Peroxidase - blood
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Rubidium - blood
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Triticum - chemistry
Zinc - blood
Abstract
The effect of an increased intake of wheat selenium (Se) on platelet Se, serum Se, whole-blood Se, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) levels was investigated in 14 healthy Norwegian females (age 21-53 years). The intake of 60 micrograms Se per day as wheat Se, for six weeks, significantly increased the platelet Se (mean +/- SEM) from 9.1 +/- 1.1 mumol/L to 11.4 +/- 0.9 mumol/L, the serum Se from 1.43 +/- 0.18 mumol/L to 1.63 +/- 0.25 mumol/L, and the whole blood Se from 1.77 +/- 0.18 mumol/L to 2.01 +/- 0.18 mumol/L. The increase in percent of initial Se values was twice as high for platelets as for serum and whole blood. The GSH-Px levels were not altered during the experiment. Platelet Se was not significantly correlated to the Se intake initially. At the end of the experimental period, the Se in platelets reflected the total Se intake, but not with a simple linear correlation. No significant correlation between the total Se intake and the Se concentration in whole blood or serum was found.
PubMed ID
8155990 View in PubMed
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Selenium addition to fertilizers effectively increased the serum levels of this element in the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229750
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 1989 Dec;8(6):588-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
H. Mussalo-Rauhamaa
J J Lehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 1989 Dec;8(6):588-90
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - etiology
Diet Surveys
Fertilizers
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Risk factors
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
PubMed ID
2559927 View in PubMed
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Selenium content of tissues in Finnish infants and adults with various diseases, and studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249721
Source
Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 1977 Aug;41(2):121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1977
Author
T. Westermarck
Source
Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 1977 Aug;41(2):121-8
Date
Aug-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrodermatitis - metabolism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Intellectual Disability - metabolism
Lipidoses - drug therapy - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Dystrophies - metabolism
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood - metabolism
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
A low blood selenium level has previously been observed in healthy inhabitants of Finland (WESTERMARCK et al. 1977). In this study even lower blood selenium values were observed in patients with acrodermatitis enteropathica, dystrophia musculorum progressiva (Duchenne), infantile and juvenile type of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), severe mental retardation caused by various factors, and myocardial infarction. The selenium content of the brain, heart, kidney and liver in patients of different ages was also determined. The highest selenium level was found in the kidney. The mean liver selenium concentrations in stillborn, premature and full-term neonates were 1.11 +/- 0.23 (8), 1.21 +/- 0.17 (12) and 0.93 +/- 0.16 microgram/g dry weight (12) respectively (the number of subjects in parentheses). The selenium values are considerably higher than those in infants of from one to nine months of age and adults, whose liver selenium values were 0.58 +/- 0.21 (8) and 0.67 +/- 0.08 microgram/g dry weight (8) respectively. The vitamin E levels of serum in patients with NCL, as well as in subjects with severe mental retardation (controls), were low compared with values in healthy normal subjects. Sodium selenite supplementation in patients with NCL produced at least a transitory improvement without causing any toxic effects during one year of administration.
PubMed ID
579051 View in PubMed
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Selenium in food and nutrition in Finland. An overview on research and action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237872
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1986;18(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
P. Koivistoinen
J K Huttunen
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1986;18(1):13-7
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Diet
Fertilizers
Finland
Food analysis
Humans
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood - deficiency
Soil - analysis
Abstract
For geochemical reasons Finland is a low-selenium area. In the 1960's several diseases associated with serious Se deficiency were observed in domestic animals. Selenium medication of animals and selenium supplementation of animal feeds from 1969 effectively eliminated these diseases. An extensive study of the trace element content of foods consumed in Finland in the 1970's demonstrated that the dietary intake of selenium was exceptionally low (25 micrograms/day/10 MJ) during the years when domestic grains were used. A study carried out in 1981 showed that supplementation of healthy middle-aged men with high selenium wheat or yeast or selenate double the glutathione peroxidase activity in platelets. Prospective epidemiological studies based on cohorts that were followed in the 1970's suggested that low selenium (less than 45 ng/ml serum) might be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Technologies to increase the selenium content of foods and feeds were developed and an official decision was reached to add, starting in 1984, sodium selenate to the main fertilizers to increase the selenium content of domestic grain to about 100 micrograms/kg. This measure will increase the average selenium intake above 50 micrograms/d even in the years when grain with a high selenium content is not imported.
PubMed ID
3013072 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.