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Health-related quality of life during hormone therapy after breast cancer: a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145131
Source
Climacteric. 2011 Feb;14(1):164-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
M. Fahlén
B. Wallberg
E. von Schoultz
K. Carlström
G. Svensson
N. Wilking
Y. Brandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Capio St Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Climacteric. 2011 Feb;14(1):164-70
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - drug therapy
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Cognition
Depression - drug therapy
Fatigue - drug therapy
Female
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy
Sweden
Tamoxifen - therapeutic use
Abstract
To study the effects of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) on health-related quality of life in women after breast cancer.
In the Stockholm trial, breast cancer survivors were randomized to HT (estradiol and progestogen) or to a control group (no treatment). A subgroup of 75 women was studied (38 with HT, 37 controls). Fifty patients were on concomitant tamoxifen. Patients completed three questionnaires (EORTC QLQ C-30, EORTC QLQ-BR 23 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) during 1 year of treatment.
A significant group-by-time interaction was found for improvement of insomnia in the HT group (p?
PubMed ID
20196640 View in PubMed
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The impact of risk on preference values: implications for evaluations of postmenopausal osteoporosis therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192556
Source
Value Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;4(5):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Coyle
G. Wells
I. Graham
K M Lee
J E Peterson
E. Papadimitropoulos
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dcoyle@lri.ca
Source
Value Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;4(5):385-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Decision Making
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - prevention & control
Perception
Probability
Raloxifene - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Value of Life - economics
Women's health
Abstract
The objective was to assess the impact of different levels of risk of disease on a woman's preferences for health states. Women were provided with health scenarios incorporating different levels of lifetime risks for breast cancer, hip fracture, and coronary heart disease (CHD). In this way, we were able to determine the incremental effect of changes in risks of each disease on preference values.
Preference values and utility scores were obtained for six health scenarios by both the feeling thermometer (FT) and standard gamble (SG) methods. Scenarios presented the different lifetime risks of CHD, breast cancer, and hip fracture associated with and not associated with long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and raloxifene. Risks of breast cancer were based on perceived risks and population risks. The sample population consisted of 40 healthy female volunteers aged between 45 and 65 years randomly selected from the Ottawa-Carleton district.
Based on their perceived risk of breast cancer, the women had higher value scores for the raloxifene risk profile than for both HRT (p = .002) and no therapy (p = .003), with similar results for analyses based on population risks and from utility scores. Regression analysis showed that the risk of breast cancer (p
PubMed ID
11705129 View in PubMed
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Nationwide drug-dispensing data reveal important differences in adherence to drug label recommendations on CYP2D6-dependent drug interactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97269
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Apr;69(4):411-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Buster Mannheimer
Björn Wettermark
Michael Lundberg
Hans Pettersson
Christer von Bahr
Erik Eliasson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Internal Medicine at Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Apr;69(4):411-7
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Cholinesterase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2D6 - antagonists & inhibitors
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
AIMS: The study aimed to investigate the clinical adherence to drug label recommendations on important drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Dispensing data on drug combinations involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants could help to identify areas for intensified medical education. METHODS: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of individual dispensing data regarding all individuals > or =15 years old in Sweden. The study analysed the prescribing and dispensing of CYP2D6 drugs (metoprolol, donepezil, galantamine, codeine, tamoxifen) together with CYP2D6-blocking SSRIs (paroxetine/fluoxetine) or SSRIs without significant CYP2D6 inhibition (citalopram/escitalopram/sertraline), and the related prescribing of CYP2D6-independent comparator drugs (atenolol, rivastigmine, propoxyphene, anastrozole). Odds were calculated between each CYP2D6 drug and the corresponding comparator drug in patients on fluoxetine/paroxetine and citalopram/escitalopram/sertraline, respectively. The odds ratio (OR) was calculated by dividing the obtained odds in patients on fluoxetine/paroxetine by the corresponding odds in patients on citalopram/escitalopram/sertraline. RESULTS: Compared with patients that were dispensed citalopram/escitalopram/sertraline, patients dispensed fluoxetine/paroxetine had lower prescribing rates of metoprolol (adjusted OR 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.76, 0.85), donepezil (0.65; 0.49, 0.86) and galantamine (0.58; 0.41, 0.81). In contrast, the use of prodrugs codeine (compared woth propoxyphene) or tamoxifen (compared with anastrozole) was similar among patients on fluoxetine/paroxetine and citalopram/escitalopram/sertraline (adjusted OR 1.03; 0.94, 1.12 and 1.29; 0.96, 1.73, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Clinically important DDIs that are associated with impaired bioactivation of prodrugs might be more easily neglected in clinical practice compared with DDIs that cause drug accumulation and symptomatic adverse drug reactions.
PubMed ID
20406225 View in PubMed
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Postfracture care for older women: gaps between optimal care and actual care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155189
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Sep;54(9):1270-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Colleen J Metge
William D Leslie
Lori-Jean Manness
Marina Yogendran
C K Yuen
Brent Kvern
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy at Manitoba Centre for Health Policy in Department of Community Health Sciences in Faculty of Medicine at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. c_metge@umanitoba.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Sep;54(9):1270-6
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Bone Density Conservation Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Diphosphates - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Patient Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Preventive Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Abstract
To investigate rates of assessment and treatment of osteoporosis among older women during the year after they have had fractures.
Observational, historical, population-based cohort study.
Manitoba, which maintains a comprehensive population-based repository of health care services provided and has a publicly funded health care system.
Women 50 years old and older who had suffered fractures between 1997 and 2002. These women were chosen from among approximately 175,000 women of this age in Manitoba.
We examined each woman's annual medical record between April 1, 1997, and March 31, 2002, to find any International Classification of Diseases fracture codes that have been consistently associated with osteoporosis. We looked for postfracture care during the first 12 months after fractures: bone mineral density (BMD) testing or treated with osteoporosis pharmacotherapy. Analysis was stratified by type of fracture: designated type 1 fractures (spine or hip) and type 2 fractures (not spine or hip).
Use of BMD testing or osteoporosis pharmacotherapy during the first 12 months following fractures.
For type 1 fractures, BMD assessment during the first year after fracture increased from 2.6% in 1997-1998 to 4.6% in 2001-2002 (P for trend .0004). Rates of therapy with osteoporosis medication increased from 4.9% in 1997-1998 to 17.6% in 2001-2002 (P for trend
Notes
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PubMed ID
18791104 View in PubMed
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Recent trends in the use of antidepressant drugs in Australia, 1990-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46140
Source
Med J Aust. 2000 Nov 6;173(9):458-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-2000
Author
P. McManus
A. Mant
P B Mitchell
W S Montgomery
J. Marley
M E Auland
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Aged Care, Canberra, ACT. peter.mcmanus@health.gov.au
Source
Med J Aust. 2000 Nov 6;173(9):458-61
Date
Nov-6-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Australia
Drug Utilization - trends
Health Surveys
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Retrospective Studies
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern of use of antidepressant drugs in the Australian community, 1990-1998, and to compare this with those of other developed countries. DESIGN: Retrospective analyses of prescription and sales data, together with information about patient encounters for depression (from an ongoing survey of service provision by general practitioners) and population-based prevalence estimates for affective disorders (from community health surveys). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: National and international consumption of antidepressants, expressed in defined daily doses (DDDs) per 1000 population per day. Changes in both the frequency of general practice patient encounters for depression and population-based prevalence estimates for affective disorders. RESULTS: Dispensing of antidepressant prescriptions through community pharmacies in Australia increased from an estimated 12.4 DDDs/1000 population per day in 1990 (5.1 million prescriptions) to 35.7 DDDs/1000 population/day in 1998 (8.2 million prescriptions). There has been a rapid market uptake of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), accompanied by a decrease of only 25% in the use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). In 1998, the level of antidepressant use in Australia was similar to that of the United States, while the rate of increase in use between 1993 and 1998 was second only to that of Sweden. In Australia, depression has risen from the tenth most common problem managed in general practice in 1990-91 to the fourth in 1998-99, and the number of people reporting depression in the National Health Surveys (1995 v 1989-90) has almost doubled. Of the prescriptions dispensed in 1998 for antidepressant drugs subsidised by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, 85% were written by general practitioners, and 11.2% by psychiatrists. CONCLUSIONS: As in most developed countries, antidepressant use increased between 1990 and 1998. The rapid market uptake of the new antidepressants, particularly SSRIs, is likely to have been driven by increased awareness of depression, together with availability and promotion of new therapies.
Notes
Comment In: Med J Aust. 2000 Nov 6;173(9):453-511149297
Comment In: Med J Aust. 2001 Apr 16;174(8):425-611346094
Comment In: Med J Aust. 2001 Apr 16;174(8):425; author reply 42611346095
PubMed ID
11149300 View in PubMed
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