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A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99387
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Josefin Westerberg-Jacobson
Birgitta Edlund
Ata Ghaderi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, BMC, Husargatan, Uppsala, Sweden. josefin.westerberg-jacobson@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Child
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Eating Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study of 593 girls (9-20-year-old) was to examine whether the internalization of the thinness ideal in terms of 'a wish to be thinner' might be related to lifestyle factors and longitudinally increase the risk of disturbed eating over time. Results showed that a wish to be thinner was related to lifestyle factors, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI) longitudinally. Girls who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, skipped meals, were eating breakfast more often alone and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish. Girls who wished to be thinner were 4 times more likely to develop disturbed eating attitudes over a 5-year period. These findings point to the importance of helping adolescents to establish regular eating habits, to avoid unhealthy dieting practices and to prevent sedentary behaviours that might lead to overweight and or obesity in early childhood.
PubMed ID
20443204 View in PubMed
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A 6 year longitudinal study of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time in Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272785
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Sep;18(5):553-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Maria Hagströmer
Lydia Kwak
Pekka Oja
Michael Sjöström
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Sep;18(5):553-7
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate changes over six years in physical activity and sedentary behavior assessed with accelerometry in a representative sample of Swedish adults.
A longitudinal study over six years.
The cohort consisted of 1172 participants (46% males) in 2002 and 511 participants (46% males) in 2008, of which 478 (45% males) had valid data on both occasions. Mean (SD) age at baseline was 45 (15) years. To analyze changes over time, a mixed linear model for average intensity physical activity (counts/min) and time in sedentary behavior and light- and moderate- or higher-intensity physical activity was conducted, stratified for sex and age, and adjusted for BMI, education, self-rated health and ? wear time.
Over a six year period no significant changes were seen in the total cohort for average intensity and time in moderate- or higher intensity physical activity. A significant decrease in average intensity physical activity was found for men (p=0.006) and those aged 60+ years at baseline (p
PubMed ID
25277849 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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1994 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88229
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-1996
heart disease, hypertension, obesity and other problems. Of the adults surveyed, 22.8% did not exercise (no leisure time physical activity), 25.4% engaged in irregular physical activity, 36.7% exercised regularly and 15.1% engaged in regular and vigorous exercise. Sedentary Lifestyle Almost half, or
  1 document  
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4(1)
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
122252
Keywords
Alcohol use
Behavioral risk factors
Breast cancer
Cervical cancer
Chronic Disease
Diabetes
Health care coverage
Health checkups
HIV/AIDS
Nutrition
Overweight
Physical activity
Premature death
Sedentary lifestyle
Tobacco use
Abstract
Behavior and lifestyle play an important part in determining ourhealth status and lifespan. Every day Alaskans make lifestyle choices that profoundly affect their health. Although heredity and environment play a part, the leading causes of death in Alaska (heart disease, cancer and unintentional injuries) are closely related to lifestyle factors. Lifestyle and behavioral factors that affect health include such things as diet, exercise, use of alcohol andtobacco, and preventive health practices. Many premature deathsand disabilities could be prevented through better control of thesebehavioral risk factors.
Documents
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Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-determined physical activity in adults and older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132641
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bjørge Herman Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sindre Mikal Dyrstad
Ingar Holme
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. bjorge.herman.hansen@nih.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-72
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity
Norway
Sedentary lifestyle
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of large-scale comparable data on the population levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary activity. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based multicenter study to describe the levels of PA and sedentary activity and to determine adherence to current national PA recommendations in Norwegian adults and older people.
In 2008 and 2009, PA was assessed objectively for seven consecutive days using the ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer in 3867 participants age 20-85 yr. A total of 3267 participants provided valid PA assessments that met all inclusion criteria.
Women and men did not differ in the overall activity levels (335 and 342 counts per minute, respectively) or in steps per day (8113 and 7951 steps per day, respectively). However, for intensity-specific PA, men accumulated significantly more minutes of sedentary activity and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) compared with women (557 vs 533 min of sedentary activity, P = 0.001 and 35 vs 33 min of MVPA, P = 0.01). Both overall activity levels and steps per day remained steady with age, until 65 yr, after which activity levels declined.
Overall, the study sample spent 62% of their time being sedentary, 25% in low-intensity PA, 9% in lifestyle activity, and 4% in MVPA. One in five people met current national PA recommendations. These results suggest that adults and older people spend the majority of their time being sedentary and that adherence to PA recommendations is low.
PubMed ID
21796052 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-measured sedentary time and physical activity-A 15 year follow-up of mortality in a Swedish population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294710
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jul; 21(7):702-707
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Ing-Mari Dohrn
Michael Sjöström
Lydia Kwak
Pekka Oja
Maria Hagströmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. Electronic address: ing-mari.dohrn@ki.se.
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jul; 21(7):702-707
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the associations of objectively assessed sedentary time, light intensity physical activity (PA), moderate to vigorous intensity PA (MVPA), and total PA with all-cause mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer in a Swedish population-based cohort with 15 years follow-up time.
Longitudinal prospective cohort study.
Data from 851 persons (56% women) =35 years at baseline were included. Primary exposure variables were time (min/day) spent sedentary, in light intensity PA and in MVPA, and total counts from an Actigraph 7164 accelerometer. Data on all-cause mortality and mortality from CVD or cancer were obtained from Swedish registers. Cox proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) of mortality with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Compared with the least sedentary participants, those in the most sedentary tertile had an increased risk of all-cause mortality, HR: 2.7 (1.4, 5.3), CVD mortality, HR: 5.5 (1.4, 21.2) and cancer mortality, HR: 4.3 (1.2, 16.0). For all-cause mortality, those in the highest light intensity PA tertile had a HR 0.34 (0.17, 0.67) compared with the lowest tertile. A similar pattern was found for CVD and cancer mortality. More time spent in MVPA was associated with the largest risk reduction for CVD mortality, with an almost 90% lower risk in the tertile with the most time in MVPA.
This study confirms a strong inverse relationship between MVPA and mortality, and adds new insight for the understanding of the associations between sedentary time and light intensity PA and mortality.
PubMed ID
29128418 View in PubMed
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Achieving hunter-gatherer fitness in the 21(st) century: back to the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140783
Source
Am J Med. 2010 Dec;123(12):1082-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
James H O'Keefe
Robert Vogel
Carl J Lavie
Loren Cordain
Author Affiliation
Mid America Heart Institute/University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64111, USA. jhokeefe@cc-pc.com
Source
Am J Med. 2010 Dec;123(12):1082-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Energy intake
Exercise
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
The systematic displacement from a very physically active lifestyle in our natural outdoor environment to a sedentary, indoor lifestyle is at the root of many of the ubiquitous chronic diseases that are endemic in our culture. The intuitive solution is to simulate the indigenous human activity pattern to the extent that this is possible and practically achievable. Suggestions for exercise mode, duration, intensity, and frequency are outlined with a focus on realigning our daily physical activities with the archetype that is encoded within our genome.
PubMed ID
20843503 View in PubMed
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Actical accelerometer sedentary activity thresholds for adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134337
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2011 May;8(4):587-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Suzy Lai Wong
Rachel Colley
Sarah Connor Gorber
Mark Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2011 May;8(4):587-91
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation - methods
Motor Activity
Sedentary lifestyle
Young Adult
Abstract
Actical accelerometer thresholds have been derived to enable objective measurement of time spent performing sedentary activity in children and adolescents, but not adults. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine Actical accelerometer sedentary activity thresholds for adults.
Data were available from 3187 participants aged 6 to 79 years from a preliminary partial dataset of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, who wore an Actical for 7 days. Step count data were used to evaluate the use of 50, 100, and 800 counts per min (cpm) as sedentary activity thresholds. Minutes when no steps were recorded were considered minutes of sedentary activity.
The use of higher cpm thresholds resulted in a greater percentage of sedentary minutes being correctly classified as sedentary. The percentage of minutes that were incorrectly classified as sedentary was substantially higher when using a threshold of 800 cpm compared with 50 or 100 cpm. Results were similar for children, adolescents, and adults.
These findings suggest that a threshold of 100 cpm is appropriate for classifying sedentary activity of adults when using the Actical. As such, wear periods with minutes registering less than 100 cpm would be classified as time spent performing sedentary activity.
PubMed ID
21597132 View in PubMed
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The added value of a brief self-efficacy coaching on the effectiveness of a 12-week physical activity program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117957
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jan Seghers
Ann-Sophie Van Hoecke
Astrid Schotte
Joke Opdenacker
Filip Boen
Author Affiliation
Dept of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health Education - methods
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Metabolic Equivalent - physiology
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Efficacy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-efficacy has been found to be an important precondition for behavioral change in sedentary people. The current study examined the effectiveness and added value of including a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a 12-week lifestyle physical activity (PA) program.
Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-intervention group (without additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 116) or extra-intervention group (with additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 111). Body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular fitness, self-reported PA, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention period. Perceived adherence to the PA program was assessed postintervention.
At posttest, a significant increase in cardiovascular fitness and decrease in BMI were found in both groups. Significant intervention effects emerged on PA behavior, self-efficacy, and program adherence, in favor of the extra-intervention group. Self-efficacy mediated the intervention effect on program adherence whereas no evidence was found for its role as mediator of PA change.
Adding a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a lifestyle PA program is a promising strategy to enhance the intervention effects on PA behavior, self-efficacy beliefs, and program adherence. However, the role of self-efficacy as mediator of the intervention effect on in PA was not fully supported.
PubMed ID
23249643 View in PubMed
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320 records – page 1 of 32.