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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinol metabolism in Swedish adults is affected by factors other than intake of whole-grain wheat and rye.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123046
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Roger Andersson
Per Aman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1479-86
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Biological Markers
Body mass index
Dietary Fiber
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale
Sex Factors
Sweden
Triticum
Young Adult
Abstract
The urinary alkylresorcinol (AR) metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid (DHPPA), could potentially serve as biomarkers for intake of whole-grain (WG) wheat and rye. Excretion of AR metabolites is largely dependent on the intake of AR but may also be influenced by other factors. This study aimed to investigate the validity of free and conjugated AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG intake of wheat and rye and to identify potential determinants of AR metabolites in urine. We quantified free aglycones and conjugates of AR metabolites in 24-h urine collections from 52 free-living Swedish adults and calculated correlation coefficients between urinary AR metabolite excretion and self-reported WG intake. We used partial least-squares regression to identify possible determinants of urinary AR metabolites. Approximately 50% of urinary AR metabolites were found as conjugates. Excretions of individually quantified free and conjugated AR metabolites and their sums were correlated to self-reported intake of WG rye and wheat (r = 0.50-0.68; P
PubMed ID
22739366 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinol metabolites in urine correlate with the intake of whole grains and cereal fibre in free-living Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125563
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2013
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Agneta Andersson
Per Åman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7051, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Date
Jan-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Alkylation
Biological Markers - urine
Cereals - chemistry - metabolism
Creatinine - urine
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - metabolism
Female
Food Handling
Humans
Hydroxybenzoates - metabolism - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Phenols - metabolism - urine
Phenylpropionates
Propionates - metabolism - urine
Reproducibility of Results
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR) have been established as short/medium-term biomarkers for whole grain (WG) wheat and rye intake; and AR metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid, have been suggested as complementary biomarkers to AR. The present study examined the medium-term reproducibility and relative validity of urinary AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG and cereal fibre intake. A total of sixty-six free-living Swedes completed 3 d weighed food records and provided single 24 h urine collections and morning urine spot samples on two occasions, 2-3 months apart. The medium-term reproducibility of urinary AR metabolites was moderate when assessed in 24 h collections and lower in creatinine (CR)-adjusted morning urine. Mean AR metabolite 24 h excretions correlated well with total WG (r(s) 0·31-0·52, P
PubMed ID
22470195 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinols in Latvian and Finnish breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122442
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb;64(1):117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Laila Meija
Adile Samaletdin
Anja Koskela
Aivars Lejnieks
Vilnis Lietuvietis
Herman Adlercreutz
Author Affiliation
Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia. laila@meija.lv
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb;64(1):117-21
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Diet
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Finland
Flour - analysis
Humans
Latvia
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Resorcinols - analysis
Secale cereale - chemistry
Seeds - chemistry
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
The alkylresorcinol (AR) content and relative homologue composition were determined in 9 Latvian and 11 Finnish soft breads. ARs were extracted with hot 1-propanol and quantified, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The total AR content (µg/g dry matter) varied from 560 to 840 in rye breads, from 500 to 700 in Finnish mixed rye and wheat flour breads, from 200 to 300 in Latvian mixed rye and wheat flour breads and from 25 to 30 in white wheat breads. Rye and white wheat breads in the two countries varied only slightly in AR content, but there were wide variations in AR content in mixed flour breads. The AR contents in soft breads could be indicators of bran or fibre content, but not of whole-grain flour content.
PubMed ID
22816971 View in PubMed
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Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116740
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Riitta Törrönen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Essi Sarkkinen
Kaisa Poutanen
Hannu Mykkänen
Leo Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Bread
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fragaria
Fruit
Humans
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Photinia
Postprandial Period - physiology
Ribes
Secale cereale
Single-Blind Method
Starch - administration & dosage
Triticum
Vaccinium macrocarpon
Vaccinium myrtillus
Vaccinium vitis-idaea
Abstract
Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries.
PubMed ID
23365108 View in PubMed
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Cereal byproducts have prebiotic potential in mice fed a high-fat diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261577
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Aug 13;62(32):8169-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2014
Author
Karin Berger
Peter Falck
Caroline Linninge
Ulf Nilsson
Ulrika Axling
Carl Grey
Henrik Stålbrand
Eva Nordberg Karlsson
Margareta Nyman
Cecilia Holm
Patrick Adlercreutz
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Aug 13;62(32):8169-78
Date
Aug-13-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa - chemistry
Bifidobacterium - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Cecum - metabolism - microbiology
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Volatile - metabolism
Food-Processing Industry - economics
Hordeum - chemistry
Hot Temperature
Hydrolysis
Industrial Waste - analysis - economics
Insulin Resistance
Intestinal Mucosa - metabolism - microbiology
Lactobacillaceae - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Male
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity - diet therapy - etiology - metabolism - microbiology
Prebiotics - economics
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Abstract
Barley husks, rye bran, and a fiber residue from oat milk production were processed by heat pretreatment, various separation steps, and treatment with an endoxylanase in order to improve the prebiotic potential of these cereal byproducts. Metabolic functions were intended to improve along with improved microbial activity. The products obtained were included in a high-fat mouse diet so that all diets contained 5% dietary fiber. In addition, high-fat and low-fat controls as well as partially hydrolyzed guar gum were included in the study. The soluble fiber product obtained from rye bran caused a significant increase in the bifidobacteria (log copies of 16S rRNA genes; median (25-75 percentile): 6.38 (6.04-6.66) and 7.47 (7.30-7.74), respectively; p
PubMed ID
25041844 View in PubMed
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Comparison of ethanol-soluble proteins from different rye (Secale cereale) varieties by two-dimensional electrophoresis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9844
Source
Electrophoresis. 2002 Dec;23(24):4157-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Louise Radzikowski
Ljiljana Nesic
Hanne Boskov Hansen
Susanne Jacobsen
Ib Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
BioCentrum--DTU, Biochemistry and Nutrition, Søltofts Plads, The Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Electrophoresis. 2002 Dec;23(24):4157-66
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional - methods
Ethanol
Indicators and Reagents
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Proteins - isolation & purification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Secale cereale - chemistry - classification
Software
Solubility
Abstract
The major storage proteins from six rye varieties, grown under the same conditions in 1997 and 1998 in Rønhave, Denmark, were analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The proteins were extracted from ground rye kernels with 70% ethanol and separated by 2-D electrophoresis. The gels were scanned, compared using ImageMaster software and the data sets were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) using THE UNSCRAMBLER software. Afterwards MATLAB was used to make a cluster analysis of the varieties based on PCA. The analysis of the gels showed, that the protein patterns (number of different proteins and their isoelectric points and molecular weights) from the six rye varieties were different. Based on the presence of unique cultivar-specific spots it was possible to differentiate between all six varieties if the two harvest years were investigated separately. When the results were combined from the two years five varieties could be differentiated. The results from the PCA confirmed the finding of the unique spots and cluster analysis was made in order to illustrate the results. The combination of the results from 2-D electrophoresis and other grain characteristics showed that one protein spot was located close to the parameters bread volume and bread height.
PubMed ID
12481272 View in PubMed
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The consumption of rye bread and white bread as dimensions of health lifestyles in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194301
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Jun;4(3):813-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
R. Prättälä
V. Helasoja
H. Mykkänen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. ritva.prittala@ktl.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Jun;4(3):813-9
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Bread - classification
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Secale cereale
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of this research was to describe the variation in bread consumption within social classes and to link this consumption to health-related lifestyles in Finland from 1978 until 1998.
A cross-sectional survey on health-related behaviour and socio-demographic factors has been conducted annually since 1978.
Mailed questionnaire.
A random sample of 5000 Finns aged 15-64 years has been drawn annually. The response rate has varied from 84% to 68%.
The consumption of rye bread decreased, but among the female population a slight increase appeared in the 1990s. The consumption of rye bread was associated with a low educational level and a rural place of residence. White bread was consumed less than was rye bread. White bread was consumed more frequently by the less educated in urban areas. Contrary to white bread, the consumption of rye bread was not associated with smoking, exercise or alcohol consumption.
The traditional place of rye bread in the Finnish dietary pattern has remained rather constant. White bread consumption has been associated with an unhealthy lifestyle. As a result, those Finns who are concerned about their health avoid white bread but seem not to associate rye bread with a healthier lifestyle. In Finland, rye bread has a different image to the image of whole-grain or dark brown bread in many other western European countries.
PubMed ID
11415489 View in PubMed
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Deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium toxins in wheat and rye flours on the Danish market.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51649
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2003 Apr;20(4):396-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
P H Rasmussen
F. Ghorbani
T. Berg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. phr@fdir.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2003 Apr;20(4):396-404
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Flour - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Fusarium
Humans
Mycotoxins - analysis
Secale cereale
Sweden
T-2 Toxin - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Trichothecenes - analysis
Triticum
Zearalenone - analysis
Abstract
Information on the contamination of Danish cereals and cereal products with Fusarium toxins is limited and the last survey is from 1984/1985. In the present study, the occurrence of deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), HT-2 toxin, T-2 toxin and zearalenone (ZON) was investigated in flour of common wheat, durum wheat and rye. The samples were collected from 1998 to 2001 from both mills and the retail market in Denmark. A total of 190 flour samples were analysed for DON and NIV and about 60 samples for HT-2, T-2 toxin and ZON. DON was most frequently detected with an incidence rate of 78% over all samples for all years. The contamination level varied considerably from year to year, and for wheat and rye the highest incidence and DON concentrations were found in samples from the 1998 harvest. There were regular and heavy rainfalls in Denmark during the flowering period of the crops that year, and DON was found in all samples, with mean concentrations in wheat and rye flour of 191 microg kg(-1) (n=14) and 99 microg kg(-1) (n=16), respectively. Comparison of data from each harvest year showed higher contents of DON in samples of wheat (range 20-527 microg kg(-1)) than in rye (20-257 microg kg(-1)). Contents of NIV, HT-2 toxin and ZON in samples of wheat and rye were generally low, and even in positive samples the contents were close to the detection limit of the methods. The T-2 toxin was detected in only a few of the wheat samples and in low amounts. However, the toxin was found in about 50% of the rye samples collected during 1998-2000, with a mean content of 49 microg kg(-1) (n=25). Durum wheat flour showed the highest DON contamination level, and all samples (n=33) collected during 2000 and 2001 contained DON with means and medians above 1100 microg kg(-1). Over 70% of the samples contained more than 500 microg kg(-1) DON, and the highest observed concentration was 2591 microg kg(-1). The concentration of T-2 toxin in durum wheat flour was also high with five of the 10 analysed samples containing more than 100 g kg(-1).
PubMed ID
12775483 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.