Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4736 records – page 1 of 474.

1 H NMR study and multivariate data analysis of reindeer skin tanning methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291047
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lizheng Zhu
Andrew J Ilott
Eleonora Del Federico
Cindie Kehlet
Torunn Klokkernes
Alexej Jerschow
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Reindeer
Seasons
Skin - chemistry
Tanning - methods
Tannins - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Reindeer skin clothing has been an essential component in the lives of indigenous people of the arctic and sub-arctic regions, keeping them warm during harsh winters. However, the skin processing technology, which often conveys the history and tradition of the indigenous group, has not been well documented. In this study, NMR spectra and relaxation behaviors of reindeer skin samples treated with a variety of vegetable tannin extracts, oils and fatty substances are studied and compared. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), one can recognize patterns and identify groupings of differently treated samples. These methods could be important aids in efforts to conserve museum leather artifacts with unknown treatment methods and in the analysis of reindeer skin tanning processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
27654838 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 1-year evaluation of Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay with selective confirmation by direct fluorescent-antibody assay in a high-volume laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217461
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
E L Chan
K. Brandt
G B Horsman
Author Affiliation
Laboratory and Disease Control Services, Saskatchewan Health, Regina, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology - isolation & purification
Cost Control
Densitometry
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique - economics
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques - economics
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Seasons
Sensitivity and specificity
Urethritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
TThe Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Syva Company, San Jose, Calif.) with cytospin and direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) confirmation was evaluated on 43,630 urogenital specimens over a 1-year period in the Provincial Laboratory in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. This was a two-phase study intended to define a testing algorithm for Chlamydia trachomatis that would be both highly accurate and cost-effective in our high-volume (> 3,000 tests per month) laboratory. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection in our population is moderate (8 to 9%). In phase 1, we tested 6,022 male and female urogenital specimens by EIA. All specimens with optical densities above the cutoff value and those within 30% below the cutoff value were retested by DFA. This was 648 specimens (10.8% of the total). A total of 100% (211 of 211) of the specimens with optical densities equal to or greater than 1.00 absorbance unit (AU) above the cutoff value, 98.2% (175 of 178) of the specimens with optical densities of between 0.500 and 0.999 AU above the cutoff value, and 83% (167 of 201) of the specimens with optical densities within 0.499 AU above the cutoff value were confirmed to be positive. A total of 12% (7 of 58) of the specimens with optical densities within 30% below the cutoff value were positive by DFA. In phase 2, we tested 37,608 specimens (32,495 from females; 5,113 from males) by EIA. Only those specimens with optical densities of between 0.499 AU above and 30% below the cutoff value required confirmation on the basis of data from phase 1 of the study. This was 4.5% of all specimens tested. This decrease in the proportion of specimens requiring confirmation provides a significant cost savings to the laboratory. The testing algorithm gives us a 1-day turnaround time to the final confirmed test results. The MicroTrak EIA performed very well in both phases of the study, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.1, 99.1, 90.3, and 99.7%, respectively, in phase 2. We suggest that for laboratories that use EIA for Chlamydia testing, a study such as this one will identify an appropriate optical density range for confirmatory testing for samples from that particular population.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1983;5:96-1236357824
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Jun;31(6):1646-78315010
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1992 Nov-Dec;15(8):663-81478048
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Nov;28(11):2473-62254422
PubMed ID
7814548 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 1-Year Quantitative Survey of Noro-, Adeno-, Human Boca-, and Hepatitis E Viruses in Raw and Secondarily Treated Sewage from Two Plants in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272273
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2015 Sep;7(3):213-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
M. Myrmel
H. Lange
E. Rimstad
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2015 Sep;7(3):213-23
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Environmental monitoring
Genotype
Hepatitis E virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Human bocavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
Phylogeny
Seasons
Sewage - virology
Water Pollution
Water Purification - instrumentation
Abstract
A study of enteric viruses in raw and treated sewage from two secondary treatment plants, which received sewage from Oslo city (plant A) and small municipalities in Hedmark county in Norway (plant B), showed high levels of noro-, adeno-, and bocavirus throughout the year. A seasonal variation was observed for adeno- and GII norovirus with higher levels during winter and bocavirus that had more positive samples during winter. The virus concentrations in raw sewage were comparable in the two plants, with medians (log10 genome copies per liter) of 6.1, 6.3, 6.0, and 4.5 for noro GI, noro GII, adeno-, and bocavirus, respectively. The level of hepatitis E virus was not determined as it was below the limit of quantification. The mean log10 virus reduction was 0.55 (plant A) and 1.44 (plant B) with the highest reduction found in the plant with longer hydraulic retention time. The adenoviruses were dominantly serotype 41, while serotype 12 appeared sporadically. Of the 102 raw and treated sewage samples that were tested, eight were positive for hepatitis E virus of which four were from treated sewage. Two of the four obtained gene sequences from hepatitis E virus originated from the rural sewage samples and showed high similarity with a genotype 3 strain of hepatitis E virus detected in local piglets. Two other hepatitis E virus sequences obtained from urban sewage samples showed high similarities with genotype 3 strains isolated from urban sewage in Spain and a human genotype 1 isolate from India. The study gives information on the levels of noroviruses in raw and treated sewage, which is valuable to risk assessment, information indicating that some infections with hepatitis E viruses in Norway have a regional origin and that human bocavirus 2 and 3 are prevalent in the Norwegian population.
PubMed ID
26003323 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 9-week randomized trial comparing a chronotherapeutic intervention (wake and light therapy) to exercise in major depressive disorder patients treated with duloxetine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119944
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Klaus Martiny
Else Refsgaard
Vibeke Lund
Marianne Lunde
Lene Sørensen
Britta Thougaard
Lone Lindberg
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Center København, Rigshospitalet, Afsnit 6202, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København ø, Denmark. klaus.martiny@regionh.dk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Phototherapy
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Single-Blind Method
Sleep Phase Chronotherapy
Thiophenes - administration & dosage
Abstract
The onset of action of antidepressants often takes 4 to 6 weeks. The antidepressant effect of wake therapy (sleep deprivation) comes within hours but carries a risk of relapse. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new chronotherapeutic intervention combining wake therapy with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization could induce a rapid and sustained augmentation of response and remission in major depressive disorder.
75 adult patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder, recruited from psychiatric wards, psychiatric specialist practices, or general medical practices between September 2005 and August 2008, were randomly assigned to a 9-week chronotherapeutic intervention using wake therapy, bright light therapy, and sleep time stabilization (n = 37) or a 9-week intervention using daily exercise (n = 38). Patients were evaluated at a psychiatric research unit. The study period had a 1-week run-in phase in which all patients began treatment with duloxetine. This phase was followed by a 1-week intervention phase in which patients in the wake therapy group did 3 wake therapies in combination with daily morning light therapy and sleep time stabilization and patients in the exercise group began daily exercise. This phase was followed by a 7-week continuation phase with daily light therapy and sleep time stabilization or daily exercise. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was the primary outcome measure, and the assessors were blinded to patients' treatment allocation.
Both groups responded well to treatment. Patients in the wake therapy group did, however, have immediate and clinically significantly better response and remission compared to the exercise group. Thus, immediately after the intervention phase (week 2), response was obtained in 41.4% of wake therapy patients versus 12.8% of exercise patients (odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.7-13.4; P = .003), and remission was obtained in 23.9% of wake therapy patients versus 5.4% of exercise patients (OR = 5.5; 95% CI, 1.7-17.8; P = .004). These superior response and remission rates obtained by the wake therapy patients were sustained for the whole study period. At week 9, response was obtained in 71.4% of wake therapy patients versus 47.3% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3; P = .04), and remission was obtained in 45.6% of wake therapy patients and 23.1% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3, P = .04). All treatment elements were well tolerated.
Patients treated with wake therapy in combination with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization had an augmented and sustained antidepressant response and remission compared to patients treated with exercise, who also had a clinically relevant antidepressant response.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00149110.
PubMed ID
23059149 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year prognosis for childhood allergic rhinitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16062
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Feb;81(2):100-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
O. Linna
J. Kokkonen
M. Lukin
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Feb;81(2):100-2
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - diagnostic use
Asthma - etiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Risk factors
Seasons
Skin Tests - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
The prognosis of allergic rhinitis was studied in 154 children aged 3-17 years at diagnosis by means of a detailed questionnaire administered 8-11 years later. The symptoms had completely disappeared in only 15 (10%) patients. The conjunctival symptoms, however, had disappeared or were controlled successfully by topical drug therapy in almost all, and 77 (50%) were managing without medication for allergic rhinitis. Twenty-five (23%) of the 110 children with seasonal allergic rhinitis had a perennial disease at follow-up, in contrast to seven (16%) of 44 with perennial allergic rhinitis originally who had only seasonal symptoms at follow-up. Asthma or wheezing had developed in 29 cases (19%) and was more common (p less than 0.01) among those with perennial allergic rhinitis (15 of 44) than among those with seasonal allergic rhinitis (14 of 110). No significant association was found between age at onset of symptoms, family history of atopic disease or type of treatment for allergic rhinitis and allergic rhinitis still present at follow-up or development of asthma during the observation period.
PubMed ID
1515750 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 20th century Danish facial cleft population--epidemiological and genetic-epidemiological studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33384
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):96-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, Odense University, Denmark. k-christensen@win-chs.ou.dk
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):96-104
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - genetics
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Epidemiology, Molecular
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Factors
Twin Studies
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Since Dr. Fogh-Andersen's legendary 1942 thesis, the Danish facial cleft population has been one of the most extensively studied in terms of epidemiology and genetic-epidemiology. The etiology of cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) is still largely an enigma, and different results concerning environmental and genetic risk factors are obtained in different countries and regions. This may be due to etiological heterogeneity between settings. Therefore, an in-depth studied area with an ethnically homogeneous population, such as Denmark, has provided one of the best opportunities for progress in CLP etiological research. The present review summarizes epidemiological and genetic-epidemiological studies conducted in the 20th century Danish facial cleft population. Furthermore, analyses of sex differences, time trends and seasonality for more than 7000 CLP cases born in Denmark in the period 1936 to 1987 are presented. The review also points toward the excellent opportunities for continued etiological CLP research in Denmark in the 21st century using already established resources and an on-going prospective cohort study of 100,000 pregnant women.
PubMed ID
10213053 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 20-year ecological study of the temporal association between influenza and meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30400
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Elise Snitker Jensen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Susanne Samuelsson
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark. esjensen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Meningococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Periodicity
Poisson Distribution
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Both influenza and meningococcal disease (MD) show seasonal variation with peak incidence rates during the winter. We examined whether fluctuations in occurrence of influenza were associated with changes in the incidence rate of MD, either simultaneously or with a delay of one or 2 weeks, and whether age had an impact on these associations. This ecological study was based on weekly surveillance data on influenza and a complete registration of MD cases (n = 413) in North Jutland County, Denmark, during 1980-1999. A total of 379 MD cases occurred during weeks with influenza registration. The analysis was done using a Poisson regression model taking into account the seasonal variation and trend over time in incidence rate of MD, and stratified by age: or = 14 years (n = 152). An increase of 100 registered cases of influenza per 100,000 inhabitants was associated with a 7% (95% CI: -1 to 15%) increase in the number of MD cases during the same week. The association was most marked for
PubMed ID
15074574 View in PubMed
Less detail

24-h sheltering behaviour of individually kept horses during Swedish summer weather.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276827
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Aug 20;57:45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2015
Author
Elke Hartmann
Richard J Hopkins
Claudia von Brömssen
Kristina Dahlborn
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Aug 20;57:45
Date
Aug-20-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - physiology
Animal Welfare - methods - physiology
Animals - methods - physiology
Behavior, Animal - methods - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - methods - physiology
Female - methods - physiology
Horses - methods - physiology
Housing, Animal - methods - physiology
Insects - methods - physiology
Male - methods - physiology
Seasons - methods - physiology
Sweden - methods - physiology
Weather - methods - physiology
Abstract
Provision of shelter for horses kept on summer pasture is rarely considered in welfare guidelines, perhaps because the benefits of shelter in warm conditions are poorly documented scientifically. For cattle, shade is a valued resource during summer and can mitigate the adverse effects of warm weather on well-being and performance. We found in a previous study that horses utilized shelters frequently in summer. A shelter with a roof and closed on three sides (shelter A) was preferred and can reduce insect pressure whereas a shelter with roof and open on three sides was not utilized. However, shelter A restricts the all-round view of a horse, which may be important for horses as flight animals. Therefore, we studied whether a shelter with roof, where only the upper half of the rear wall was closed (shelter B), would be utilized while maintaining insect protection properties and satisfying the horses' sense for security. A third shelter was offered with walls but no roof (shelter C) to evaluate whether the roof itself is an important feature from the horse's perspective. Eight Warmblood horses were tested each for 2?days, kept individually for 24?h in two paddocks with access to shelters A and B, or shelters A and C, respectively. Shelter use was recorded continuously during the night (1800-2400?h, 0200-0600?h) and the following day (0900-1600?h), and insect defensive behaviour (e.g., tail swish) in instantaneous scan samples at 5-min intervals during daytime.
Seven horses used both shelters A and B, but when given the choice between shelters A and C, shelter C was scarcely visited. There was no difference in duration of shelter use between night (105.8???53.6?min) and day (100.8???53.8, P?=?0.829). Daytime shelter use had a significant effect on insect defensive behaviours (P?=?0.027). The probability of performing these behaviours was lowest when horses used shelter A compared to being outside (P?=?0.038).
Horses only utilized shelters with a roof whilst a shelter with roof and closed on three sides had the best potential to lower insect disturbance during daytime in summer.
Notes
Cites: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1972 Jul;21(4):487-915050097
Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol A Comp Physiol. 1975 Oct 1;52(2):343-9240591
Cites: Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract. 1990 Aug;6(2):355-722202497
Cites: J Anim Sci. 1999 Aug;77(8):2065-7210461983
Cites: J Anim Sci. 2008 Jan;86(1):226-3417911236
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2010 Jun 7;277(1688):1643-5020129982
Cites: Int J Parasitol. 2013 Jun;43(7):555-6323500071
Cites: J Anim Sci. 2013 Dec;91(12):5926-3624126269
Cites: J Anim Sci. 2014 Apr;92(4):1708-1724492578
Cites: J Anim Sci. 2015 Feb;93(2):802-1026020760
PubMed ID
26289447 View in PubMed
Less detail

4736 records – page 1 of 474.