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4724 records – page 1 of 473.

Source
Br Med J. 1972 Dec 9;4(5840):613
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1972
Author
J D Bury
Source
Br Med J. 1972 Dec 9;4(5840):613
Date
Dec-9-1972
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Climate
Humans
Humidity
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Saskatchewan
Seasons
PubMed ID
4643414 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pollen seasons: forecasts of the most important allergenic plants in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237023
Source
Allergy. 1986 May;41(4):233-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
A. Koivikko
R. Kupias
Y. Mäkinen
A. Pohjola
Source
Allergy. 1986 May;41(4):233-42
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Forecasting
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Poaceae
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Seasons
Trees
Abstract
Occurrence of airborne pollen in Finland has been studied for 10 years in Turku (southern Finland), 8 years in Oulu, 4 years in Kuopio (central Finland) and 7 years at Kevo (northern Lapland). Observations on the pollen seasons of alder, birch, grasses and mugwort are presented. All these pollens occur in south and mid- Finland in quantities capable of causing allergy symptoms. Except for birch pollen, allergenic pollens occur in far lower concentrations than in central Europe. In northern Lapland only birch and pine pollen concentrations are high. Pollens may occur without signs of local flowering when there are southerly winds. This finding suggests that long-distance transport is an essential contributing factor to the occurrence of pollens. There are wide year-to-year variations in the start of pollen seasons and the quantities of pollens. The variations in the start of birch and grass pollen seasons could very much depend on the mean temperature in April. However, a forecasting model based on this and other spring-time temperature parameters often fails to give sufficiently accurate forecasts.
PubMed ID
3752415 View in PubMed
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Responses in the start of Betula (birch) pollen seasons to recent changes in spring temperatures across Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3819
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2002 Sep;46(4):159-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
J. Emberlin
M. Detandt
R. Gehrig
S. Jaeger
N. Nolard
A. Rantio-Lehtimäki
Author Affiliation
National Pollen Research Unit, University College, Worcester WR2 6AJ, UK. j.emberlin@worc.ac.uk
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2002 Sep;46(4):159-70
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Betula
Climate
Europe
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Seasons
Temperature
Abstract
A shift in the timing of birch pollen seasons is important because it is well known to be a significant aeroallergen, especially in NW Europe where it is a notable cause of hay fever and pollen-related asthma. The research reported in this paper aims to investigate temporal patterns in the start dates of Betula (birch) pollen seasons at selected sites across Europe. In particular it investigates relationships between the changes in start dates and changes in spring temperatures over approximately the last 20 years. Daily birch pollen counts were used from Kevo, Turku, London, Brussels, Zurich and Vienna, for the core period from 1982 to 1999 and, in some cases, from 1970 to 2000. The sites represent a range of biogeographical situations from just within the Arctic Circle through to North West Maritime and Continental Europe. Pollen samples were taken with Hirst-type volumetric spore traps. Weather data were obtained from the sites nearest to the pollen traps. The timing of birch pollen seasons is known to depend mostly on a non-linear balance between the winter chilling required to break dormancy, and spring temperatures. Pollen start dates and monthly mean temperatures for January through to May were compiled to 5-year running means to examine trends. The start dates for the next 10 years were calculated from regression equations for each site, on the speculative basis that the current trends would continue. The analyses show regional contrasts. Kevo shows a marked trend towards cooler springs and later starts. If this continues the mean start date will become about 6 days later over the next 10 years. Turku exhibits cyclic patterns in start dates. A current trend towards earlier starts is expected to continue until 2007, followed by another fluctuation. London, Brussels, Zurich and Vienna show very similar patterns in the trends towards earlier start dates. If the trend continues the mean start dates at these sites will advance by about 6 days over the next 10 years. Following this work, amendments will be needed to pollen calendars and local predictive models. It will also be important to assess the implications of earlier seasons for allergy sufferers.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Biometeorol. 2003 Mar;47(2):113-5
PubMed ID
12242471 View in PubMed
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The long-range transport of birch (Betula) pollen from Poland and Germany causes significant pre-season concentrations in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162308
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2007 Aug;37(8):1204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
C A Skjøth
J. Sommer
A. Stach
M. Smith
J. Brandt
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, Roskilde, Denmark. cas@dmu.dk
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2007 Aug;37(8):1204-12
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution
Betula
Denmark
Forecasting
Germany
Humans
Poland
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
Seasons
Abstract
Birch pollen is highly allergic and has the potential for episodically long-range transport. Such episodes will in general occur out of the main pollen season. During this time, allergy patients are unprotected and high pollen concentrations will therefore have a full allergenic impact.
To show that Denmark obtains significant quantities of birch pollen from Poland or Germany before the local trees start to flower.
Simultaneous observations of pollen concentrations and phenology in the potential source area in Poland as well as in Denmark were performed in 2006. The Danish pollen records from 2000 to 2006 were analysed for possible long-range transport episodes and analysed with trajectories in combination with a birch tree source map.
In 2006, high pollen concentrations were observed in Denmark with bi-hourly concentrations above 500 grains/m(3) before the local trees began to flower. Poland was identified as a source region. The analysis of the historical pollen record from Copenhagen shows significant pre-seasonal pollen episodes almost every year from 2000 to 2006. In all episodes, trajectory analysis identified Germany or Poland as source regions.
Denmark obtains significant pre-seasonal quantities of birch pollen from either Poland or Germany almost every year. Forecasting of birch pollen quantities relevant to allergy patients must therefore, take into account long-range transport. This cannot be based on measured concentrations in Denmark. The most effective way to improve the current Danish pollen forecasts is to extend the current forecasts with atmospheric transport models that take into account pollen emission and transport from countries such as Germany and Poland. Unless long-range transport is taken into account, pre-seasonal pollen episodes will have a full allergic impact, as the allergy patients in general will be unprotected during that time.
PubMed ID
17651151 View in PubMed
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The most important allergens in allergic rhinitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247786
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1979;360:16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
E. Holopainen
O P Salo
E. Tarkiainen
H. Malmberg
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1979;360:16-8
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens
Angiosperms
Dust
Humans
Poaceae
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology - immunology
Scandinavia
Seasons
Trees
Abstract
The distribution of allergens, found on thorough allergy work-up in a series of 770 patients with seasonal and perennial nasal symptoms, is reported. The percentages of positive reactions to grass, tree, and herb pollens were equally high (30--40%) but, clinically, pollens from grasses (Timothy, Alopecurus, Kentucky Blue and Meadow fescue), birch and mugwort (Artemisia) were the most important. In the Nordic countries house dust is evidently the commonest causative agent in perennial rhinitis but the heterogenous composition of house dust makes it difficult to determine potent allergenic factors. Sensitivity to house dust was present in 44% of the patients; a positive reaction to mite extract in only 10%. Animal danders were not found to be great importance in allergic rhinitis (13--18%). Reactions to moulds were observed in 9% of the patients.
PubMed ID
287333 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Alnus, Corylus and Betula pollen counts in Lublin (Poland) and Skien (Norway).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176777
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2004;11(2):205-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Krystyna Piotrowska
Author Affiliation
Department of Botany, Agricultural University, Akademicka 15, 20-950 Lublin, Poland. kpbot@agros.ar.lublin.pl
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2004;11(2):205-8
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alnus
Betula
Corylus
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Norway
Poland
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Seasons
Abstract
Symptoms of pollen allergy in springtime in Middle and Northern Europe are mainly caused by pollen grains of birch, hazel and alder. The aim of the present study was the pollen fall comparison of the mentioned taxa in Lublin (Poland) and Skien (Norway). These sites are located approximately 1,200 km away apart by air. The pollen monitoring was carried out by gravimetric method in 1999-2000. The start and end of pollen seasons were defined by the 90% method. The beginning of pollen seasons for Corylus and Betula were observed 1-3 weeks earlier in Lublin than in Skien, but pollen grains of Alnus appeared simultaneously in both towns. In 1999, annual totals of Alnus, Corylus and Betula pollen grains were considerably less numerous in Skien than in Lublin. No important differences were observed among the pollen fall amounts of the mentioned taxa in 2000. The maximum values of pollen grains were defined in different terms. The results of investigations differed as regards the years compared as well as the sites.
PubMed ID
15627325 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequencies of seasonal major depressive symptoms at high latitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222374
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1993;243(3-4):189-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
T. Partonen
M. Partinen
J. Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1993;243(3-4):189-92
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Seasonal Affective Disorder - epidemiology
Seasons
Abstract
A modified depression rating scale was distributed to a sample of the adult Finnish population (n = 1000) in November 1991. No dependence on latitude (60 degrees N-70 degrees N) was seen in the occurrence of depression. The depressed subjects (n = 54) were reevaluated the following May, and four cases with seasonal affective disorder were found. The results suggest that high latitudes with large variations in the daily lightperiod may not be responsible for high prevalence of major depression with a seasonal pattern.
PubMed ID
8117763 View in PubMed
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[Ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.): prediction and prevention].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224678
Source
Allerg Immunol (Paris). 1992 Jan;24(1):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
P. Comtois
D. Sherknies
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire d'aérobiologie, Université de Montréal, Canada.
Source
Allerg Immunol (Paris). 1992 Jan;24(1):22-6
Date
Jan-1992
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Algorithms
Allergens - isolation & purification
Canada
Forecasting
Humans
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology - prevention & control
Seasons
Abstract
Ragweed is the dominant type of the atmospheric spora of North America. In this paper we present a forecasting model based on the probabilistic distribution of pollen curves, which was applied to four years of sampling. Except for rapid (24 hours) but large fluctuations of the pollen concentration, our algorithm allows for an adequate estimate of the exposure risk. However, these rapid fluctuations can account for up to 40% of the annual pollen sum.
PubMed ID
1575898 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1981 Jul;59(7):107-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Source
Sven Lakartidn. 1963 Aug 28;60:2461-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1963
Author
N. Magnusson
Source
Sven Lakartidn. 1963 Aug 28;60:2461-79
Date
Aug-28-1963
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism
Seasons
Statistics
Sweden
PubMed ID
14049218 View in PubMed
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4724 records – page 1 of 473.