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137 Cs concentrations in northern Alaskan Eskimos, 1962-79: effects of ecological, cultural and political factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1022
Source
Health Physics. 42(4):433-447.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
Hanson, WC
Author Affiliation
Battelle
Source
Health Physics. 42(4):433-447.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Ambler
Anaktuvuk Pass
Barrow
Cesium-137
Diet, traditional
Food chain
Kotzebue
Point Hope
Radioactive fallout
Seasonal periodicity
Abstract
Concentrations of worldwide fallout 137Cs were measured in the lichen-caribou-Eskimo food chain of northern Alaska during the period 1962-79. Pronounced inputs of fallout occurred after major nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere and 137Cs was transmitted through the food chain to Eskimos with about a 2-yr delay due to environmental parameters. Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) meat sampled during spring harvest contained 4 times the 137Cs concentration of lichens obtained from their winter range. Calculated caribou meat ingestion rates of Anaktuvuk Pass Eskimos during winter ranged from approximately 1 kg/day in 1964 to 0.16 kg/day in 1977. Several environmental factors affected seasonal patterns and amounts of 137Cs transferred through the food chain. Maximum 137Cs concentrations of approximately 20 nCi/kg body weight in ESkimos occurred in 1964 and have now decreased to approximately 0.5 nCi/kg, largely because of cultural and political factors. Radiation doses from 137Cs body burdens during the study period ranged from 60 mrad/yr in 1962 to approximately 140 mrad/yr during the 1962-64 maxima and decreased to 8 mrad/yr in 1979.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 832.
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Acute intestinal disease in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature956
Source
Journal of Public Health. 49(11):1441-1453.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1959
Author
Gordon, J.E.
Babbott, Jr., F.L.
Author Affiliation
Harvard University
Source
Journal of Public Health. 49(11):1441-1453.
Date
1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Wainwright
Kotzebue
Diarrhea
Carrier state
Seasonal periodicity
Typhoid
Shigella spp.
Dysentery
Salmonella spp.
Paratyphoid
Zoonosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1705.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 681.
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The Bacterial flora of the forehead and back of Alaskan Native villagers in summer and in winter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature774
Source
Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 1984 Mar; 82(3):294-297.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
Evans, C.A.
Crook, J.R.
Strom, M.S.
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 1984 Mar; 82(3):294-297.
Date
1984
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Seasonal periodicity
Saprophytes
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Back
Female
Forehead
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Propionibacterium acnes - isolation & purification
Seasons
Skin - microbiology
Staphylococcus - isolation & purification
Washington
Abstract
The bacterial flora of the forehead and back of Eskimo and Indian villagers in arctic Alaska was determined in midsummer and in winter (temperature -29 degrees to -46 degrees C). Specimens collected by the wet swab method were transported overnight, chilled, to Seattle in buffered diluent with Triton X-100. Control tests showed good survival of principal skin organisms with moderate or large initial populations and a disproportionately greater loss with an initial sparse population. Results of these studies are compared with earlier studies of the forehead flora of a Seattle urban population. On most Alaskan subjects Propionibacterium acnes was more abundant than staphylococci on both sites and both organisms had greater population densities on the forehead than on the back. Population densities for P. acnes varied from none detected to more than 10(6) per cm2 on the forehead and 10(5) per cm2 on the back. For coagulase-negative staphylococci the range was from none detected to more than 10(5) per cm2 on the forehead and the back. The proportion of subjects with relatively abundant or relatively sparse populations of P. acnes and of staphylococci did not change seasonally. Of 51 staphylococcal isolates, 65% were S. epidermidis, 22% S. capitis, and 10% S. hominis. P. saccharolyticus was found on a minority of subjects on both sites. The kinds of organisms found on the forehead and their variable individual population densities were essentially the same on the Alaskan villagers and the Seattle subjects.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1867.
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A bacteriological and parasitological survey of enteric infections in an Alaskan Eskimo area

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature875
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1958 Nov;48(11):1489-1497
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1958
  1 website  
Author
Fournelle, H.J.
Wallace, I.L.
Rader, V.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1958 Nov;48(11):1489-1497
Date
Nov-1958
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Diarrhea
Diphyllobothrium spp.
Entamoeba histolytica
Enterobius vermicularis
Escherichia coli
Giardia lamblia
Napakiak
Salmonella spp.
Seasonal periodicity
Shigella spp.
Typhoid
Zoonosis
Bacillus
Etiology
Dysentery
Epidemiology
Humans
Intestines
Microbiology
Inuits
Parasitic Diseases
Abstract
The present survey of enteric infections in the Eskimo population of the lower Kuskokwim River area in southwestern Alaska was initiated in August 1955. Information desired included: (1) prevalence of diarrhea and of bacterial and parasitic agents, (2) age groups involved, (3) time of year of occurrence, and (4) identity of bacterial and parasitic agents. Procedures and techniques have already been given. In general, a single fecal specimen per individual (human and canine) was examined. Specimens were cultured in the field, and suspected bacterial pathogens were isolated and held for further study in the Anchorage laboratory. Specimens for parasitological examination were placed in MIF fluid and held until return to the laboratory, with examinations made at a later date. Ten villages were visited between August 1955 and September 1956, which were in coastal, tundra, and river locations. Populations ranged between 48 and 650 per village, with an estimated total of 2,378. Nine fish camps, located over a 12-mile stretch on the Kuskokwim River between Bethel and Napakiak, were visited in August 1956. The people who live in these camps for two to three months each summer come from coastal and tundra villages. Camp populations ranged between 24 and 160, with a total of approximately 638. Interviews were held in 312 village dwellings during August-November, 1955 and July-September, 1956; and in 96 fish camp tents during August, 1956. Interviewing was started at one end of the village or fish camp and carried out progressively in every occupied house or tent in the community, with exceptions in the two largest villages, where about 80 per cent of the dwellings were visited.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1682.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 680.
PubMed ID
13595145 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Blood volume and basal metabolic rate of Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature390
Source
Metabolism. 3:247-254.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1954
Author
Brown, G.M.
Author Affiliation
Queen's University
Source
Metabolism. 3:247-254.
Date
1954
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Coral Harbour
Basal metabolic rate
Blood volume
Seasonal periodicity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 950.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 161.
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The Central Arctic. An area economic survey. 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2579
Source
Industrial Div., Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa. A.E.S.R. 68/1. 189 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1969
Author
Villiers, D.
Source
Industrial Div., Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa. A.E.S.R. 68/1. 189 pp.
Date
1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Spence Bay
Gjoa Haven
Pelly Bay
Health services
Nursing stations
Lay dispenser
Health status
Seasonal periodicity
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1520.
UAA Consortium Library - Alaskana Reference HC117.N5 V53
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Cesium-137 in Alaskan lichens, caribou and Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111309
Source
Health Phys. 1967 Apr;13(4):383-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1967
Author
W C Hanson
Source
Health Phys. 1967 Apr;13(4):383-9
Date
Apr-1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Cesium isotopes
Environmental Exposure
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Inuits
Lichens - radiation effects
Male
Meat
Radiation Effects
Radioactive fallout
Seasonal periodicity
Anaktuvuk Pass
Food chain
Diet, traditional
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 828.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 126.
PubMed ID
6029683 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic studies of otitis media among Eskimo children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286968
Source
Public Health Reports. 85(8):699-706.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
Reed, D.
Dunn, W.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 85(8):699-706.
Date
1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Otitis media
Audiometry
Hearing deficiency
Seasonal periodicity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Epidemiologic studies of otitis media among Eskimo children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2062
Source
Public Health Reports. 1970 Aug;85(8):699-706.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
Reed, D.
Dunn, W.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 1970 Aug;85(8):699-706.
Date
1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Seasonal periodicity
Alaska
Audiometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
Family Characteristics
Female
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Housing
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Parent-Child Relations
Penicillin G - therapeutic use
Seasons
Sulfonamides - therapeutic use
Weather
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2446.
PubMed ID
4988671 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of nasopharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis in an isolated northern community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1818
Source
Pages 235-237 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
  1 document  
Author
Nicolle, L.E.
Author Affiliation
Calgary General Hospital
Source
Pages 235-237 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Baker Lake
Carrier state
Culture survey
Epidemics
Meningitis
Neisseria meningitidis
Seasonal periodicity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1879.
Documents
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31 records – page 1 of 4.