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Celebrity suicide on Twitter: Activity, content and network analysis related to the death of Swedish DJ Tim Bergling alias Avicii.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299092
Source
J Affect Disord. 2019 02 15; 245:848-855
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-15-2019
Author
Thomas Niederkrotenthaler
Benedikt Till
David Garcia
Author Affiliation
Unit Suicide Research & Mental Health Promotion, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: thomas.niederkrotenthaler@meduniwien.ac.at.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2019 02 15; 245:848-855
Date
02-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Emotions
Famous Persons
Humans
Internet - statistics & numerical data
Search Engine
Social Media
Suicide - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Media recommendations for suicide reporting are recommended to prevent imitative suicide but little is known about social media reactions to different revelations about celebrity suicide.
Using the Twitter Application Programming Interface (API), we recorded public tweets mentioning Avicii from the day when his death was reported (N?=?2,865,292). We compared that data with a dataset of random tweets. Furthermore, we recorded tweets including suicide in 124 languages before Avicii's death (N?=?5,939,107). We processed English tweets mentioning Avicii with the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) to quantify the frequency of affects and related linguistic signals. We also processed the text of tweets to detect tweets mentioning the suicide method, and we retrieved the list of followers of users who tweeted about the method. We constructed reply networks from the dataset, analysing three networks corresponding to the major news events about Avicii's death.
Avicii's suicide sparked immediate strong interest with both positive (?²?=?781.06, p?
PubMed ID
30699869 View in PubMed
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Decision making in family medicine: randomized trial of the effects of the InfoClinique and Trip database search engines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106673
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Oct;59(10):1084-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Michel Labrecque
Stéphane Ratté
Pierre Frémont
Michel Cauchon
Jérôme Ouellet
William Hogg
Jessie McGowan
Marie-Pierre Gagnon
Merlin Njoya
France Légaré
Author Affiliation
Laval University, Département de médecine familiale et de médecine d'urgence, Hôpital St-François d'Assise, D6-728, 10 rue de l'Espinay, Quebec city, QC G1L 3L5. michel.labrecque@mfa.ulaval.ca.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Oct;59(10):1084-94
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Databases, Factual
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Medicine
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency
Male
Models, Statistical
PubMed
Quebec
Search Engine
Abstract
To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process.
Randomized trial.
Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que.
Fifteen second-year family medicine residents.
Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database.
The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine's effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice.
Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either search engine. The mean (SD) time of the initial search for each question was 23.5 (7.6) minutes with InfoClinique and 22.3 (7.8) minutes with the Trip database (P = .30). Participants' perceptions of each engine's effect on the decision-making process were very positive and similar for both search engines.
Family medicine residents' ability to provide correct answers to clinical questions increased dramatically and similarly with the use of both InfoClinique and the Trip database. These tools have strong potential to increase the quality of medical care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24130286 View in PubMed
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Detecting the norovirus season in Sweden using search engine data--meeting the needs of hospital infection control teams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267622
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e100309
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Michael Edelstein
Anders Wallensten
Inga Zetterqvist
Anette Hulth
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e100309
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Cross Infection - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Databases as Topic
Disease Outbreaks
Electronic Health Records
Hospitals
Humans
Needs Assessment
Norovirus
Patient Care Planning
Population Surveillance
Search Engine
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Webs?k, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Webs?k users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Webs?k searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Webs?k and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Webs?k. Users of Webs?k were not representative of the general population. Webs?k correlated with laboratory data (b?=?0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Webs?k could help with infection control plans. Webs?k is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Webs?k in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24955857 View in PubMed
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GET WELL: an automated surveillance system for gaining new epidemiological knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135088
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:252
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Anette Hulth
Gustaf Rydevik
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, SE-171 82 Solna, Sweden. anette.hulth@smi.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:252
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Communicable Disease Control - standards
Epidemiology
Health promotion
Humans
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - physiopathology
Information Storage and Retrieval - statistics & numerical data - trends
Internet - utilization
Medical Informatics Applications
Population Surveillance - methods
Search Engine - utilization
Seasons
Software
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Time and Motion Studies
Vomiting - diagnosis - physiopathology
Abstract
The assumption behind the presented work is that the information people search for on the internet reflects the disease status in society. By having access to this source of information, epidemiologists can get a valuable complement to the traditional surveillance and potentially get new and timely epidemiological insights. For this purpose, the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control collaborates with a medical web site in Sweden.
We built an application consisting of two conceptual parts. One part allows for trends, based on user specified requests, to be extracted from anonymous web query data from a Swedish medical web site. The second conceptual part permits tailored analyses of particular diseases, where more complex statistical methods are applied to the data. To evaluate the epidemiological relevance of the output, we compared Google search data and search data from the medical web site.
In the paper, we give concrete examples of the output from the web query-based system. We also present results from the comparison between data from the search engine Google and search data from the national medical web site.
The application is in regular use at the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control. A system based on web queries is flexible in that it can be adapted to any disease; we get information on other individuals than those who seek medical care; and the data do not suffer from reporting delays. Although Google data are based on a substantially larger search volume, search patterns obtained from the medical web site may still convey more information from an epidemiological perspective. Furthermore we can see advantages with having full access to the raw data.
Notes
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2005 Jul 1;7(3):e3615998627
Cites: AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2006;:244-817238340
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Dec 1;47(11):1443-818954267
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Cites: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(44). pii: 1938619941777
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Apr 14;180(8):829-3119364791
PubMed ID
21510860 View in PubMed
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Performance of eHealth data sources in local influenza surveillance: a 5-year open cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257563
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(4):e116
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Toomas Timpka
Armin Spreco
Örjan Dahlström
Olle Eriksson
Elin Gursky
Joakim Ekberg
Eva Blomqvist
Magnus Strömgren
David Karlsson
Henrik Eriksson
James Nyce
Jorma Hinkula
Einar Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. toomas.timpka@liu.se.
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(4):e116
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Disease Outbreaks
Health Information Systems
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Internet
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Search Engine
Sweden - epidemiology
Telemedicine
Young Adult
Abstract
There is abundant global interest in using syndromic data from population-wide health information systems--referred to as eHealth resources--to improve infectious disease surveillance. Recently, the necessity for these systems to achieve two potentially conflicting requirements has been emphasized. First, they must be evidence-based; second, they must be adjusted for the diversity of populations, lifestyles, and environments.
The primary objective was to examine correlations between data from Google Flu Trends (GFT), computer-supported telenursing centers, health service websites, and influenza case rates during seasonal and pandemic influenza outbreaks. The secondary objective was to investigate associations between eHealth data, media coverage, and the interaction between circulating influenza strain(s) and the age-related population immunity.
An open cohort design was used for a five-year study in a Swedish county (population 427,000). Syndromic eHealth data were collected from GFT, telenursing call centers, and local health service website visits at page level. Data on mass media coverage of influenza was collected from the major regional newspaper. The performance of eHealth data in surveillance was measured by correlation effect size and time lag to clinically diagnosed influenza cases.
Local media coverage data and influenza case rates showed correlations with large effect sizes only for the influenza A (A) pH1N1 outbreak in 2009 (r=.74, 95% CI .42-.90; P
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Jul-Aug;102(4):294-721913587
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PubMed ID
24776527 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Dataset
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Canadian Cryospheric Information Network
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Dataset
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
Research Personnel
Metadata
Search Engine
Social Sciences
Policy
Natural Science Disciplines
Abstract
The Polar Data Catalogue is a database of metadata and data that describes, indexes, and provides access to diverse data sets generated by Arctic and Antarctic researchers. The metadata records follow ISO 19115 and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) standard formats to provide exchange with other data centres. The records cover a wide range of disciplines from natural sciences and policy, to health and social sciences. The PDC Geospatial Search tool is available to the public and researchers alike and allows searching data using a mapping interface and other parameters.
Online Resources
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RePORTER - NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288537
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Publications
Other Publications Databases
United States
Search Engine
Databases
Factual
Financial Support
Abstract
This comprehensive search database combines NIH project databases and funding records, PubMed abstracts, full-text articles from PubMed Central, and information from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office with a robust search engine, allowing users to locate descriptions and funding details on NIH-funded projects along with research results that cite the NIH support.
Online Resources
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Searching for medical information online: a survey of Canadian nephrologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136630
Source
J Nephrol. 2011 Nov-Dec;24(6):723-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Salimah Z Shariff
Shayna A D Bejaimal
Jessica M Sontrop
Arthur V Iansavichus
Matthew A Weir
R Brian Haynes
Mark R Speechley
Amardeep Thind
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. salimah.shariff@lhsc.on.ca
Source
J Nephrol. 2011 Nov-Dec;24(6):723-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Bibliographic - utilization
Female
Humans
MEDLINE - utilization
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Nephrology
Online Systems - utilization
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
PubMed - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Search Engine - utilization
Abstract
Physicians often search for information to improve patient care. We evaluated how nephrologists use online information sources for this purpose.
In this cross-sectional study (2008 to 2010), a random sample of Canadian nephrologists completed a survey of their online search practices. We queried respondents on their searching preferences, practices and use of 9 online information sources.
Respondents (n=115; 75% response rate) comprised both academic (59%) and community-based (41%) nephrologists. Respondents were an average of 48 years old and were in practice for an average of 15 years. Nephrologists used a variety of online sources to retrieve information on patient treatment including UpToDate (92%), PubMed (89%), Google (76%) and Ovid MEDLINE (55%). Community-based nephrologists were more likely to consult UpToDate first (91%), while academic nephrologists were divided between UpToDate (58%) and PubMed (41%). When searching bibliographic resources such as PubMed, 80% of nephrologists scan a maximum of 40 citations (the equivalent of 2 search pages in PubMed). Searching practices did not differ by age, sex or years in practice.
Nephrologists routinely use a variety of online resources to search for information for patient care. These include bibliographic databases, general search engines and specialized medical resources.
PubMed ID
21360475 View in PubMed
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The tanning habits and interest in sunscreen of Google users: what happened in 12 years?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281304
Source
Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2017 Mar;33(2):68-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Michael C Kirchberger
Markus V Heppt
Thomas K Eigentler
Markus A Kirchberger
Gerold Schuler
Lucie Heinzerling
Source
Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2017 Mar;33(2):68-74
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Brazil
Canada
France
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Internet - statistics & numerical data - trends
Japan
Russia
Search Engine - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Singapore
Sunbathing - trends
Sunscreening Agents
Sweden
Turkey
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United Kingdom
United States
Abstract
The incidence of melanoma has been rising worldwide. One possible reason for this is natural and artificial UV exposure. Only little data on actual consumer statistics from tanning studios and the usage of sunscreen are available. Therefore, it is difficult to describe trends for both and identify the impact of preventive measures.
To gain knowledge about the popularity of 'tanning bed' and 'sunscreen', normalized search volumes for both search queries were obtained from Google Trends for 11 countries between January 2004 and June 2016.
With few exceptions, worldwide interest in 'tanning bed' has been declining, whereas interest in 'sunscreen' has been increasing. The assessed countries from the Southern Hemisphere showed minor interest in tanning compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Both search queries were observed to fluctuate in a seasonal pattern. Skin cancer prevention measures influence the interest in tanning beds and sunscreen.
Google Trends data can act as a first surrogate marker to evaluate the influence of skin cancer campaigns on the popularity of tanning beds and sunscreen. Fine-tuning of skin cancer campaigns according to seasonal and geographic trends and behaviors may help to maximize their success.
PubMed ID
28039945 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.