Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) strain in the mouse model with concurrent exposure to PCB 153.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259939
Source
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 May;37(3):195-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Ingebjørg H Nymo
Carlos G das Neves
Morten Tryland
Bård-Jørgen Bårdsen
Renato Lima Santos
Andreia Pereira Turchetti
Andrew M Janczak
Berit Djønne
Elisabeth Lie
Vidar Berg
Jacques Godfroid
Source
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 May;37(3):195-204
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Atlantic Ocean
Brucella - drug effects - immunology - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - immunology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Immunoglobulins - blood
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Population Dynamics
Reproduction - drug effects - physiology
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Spleen - drug effects - immunology - microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis, is linked to reproductive problems in primary hosts. A high proportion of Brucella-positive hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) have been detected in the declined Northeast Atlantic stock. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have also been discovered in top predators in the Arctic, including the hooded seal, PCB 153 being most abundant. The aim of this study was to assess the pathogenicity of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in the mouse model and to evaluate the outcome of Brucella spp. infection after exposure of mice to PCB 153. BALB/c mice were infected with B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain or Brucella suis 1330, and half from each group was exposed to PCB 153 through the diet. B. pinnipedialis showed a reduced pathogenicity in the mouse model as compared to B. suis 1330. Exposure to PCB 153 affected neither the immunological parameters, nor the outcome of the infection. Altogether this indicates that it is unlikely that B. pinnipedialis contribute to the decline of hooded seals in the Northeast Atlantic.
PubMed ID
24534631 View in PubMed
Less detail

Observations on the distribution and ecology of Clostridium botulinum type E in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1733
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 1975 Jun; 21(6):920-926.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
Miller, L.G.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 1975 Jun; 21(6):920-926.
Date
1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Botulism, type E
Diet, traditional
Environmental health
Culture survey
Zoonosis
Alaska
Animals
Botulinum Toxins - isolation & purification
Clostridium botulinum - enzymology - isolation & purification
Ecology
Food Microbiology
Gelatin - metabolism
Otters - microbiology
Peptide Hydrolases
Salmon - microbiology
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Soil Microbiology
Temperature
Walruses - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Whales - microbiology
Abstract
Environmental samples collected along the coastline and from the interior of Alaska were examined for the presence of Clostridium botulinum. Clostridium botulinum type E was detected in soils from 5 of 12 beaches; in 7 of 115 non-coastal soil samples; in sediments from six of eight locales; in gills of salmon from two fishing areas; and in the feces of 1 of 44 colonic samples from marine mammals. The basic biochemical characteristics of the isolates were determined. Tube tests for demonstrating gelatin liquefaction proved insensitive with these strains, whereas a plate test detected gelatinase in all isolates. The presence of multiple nidi and the continual discharge of organic materials into the environment may contribute to the perpetuation of botulinum spores by which foods prepared form marine animals become contaminated. An emphasis should be placed upon the need for measures to reduce environmental contamination, to reduce contamination during food preparation, and to alert continually the population of the hazard wherever botulism is endemic.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1847.
Less detail

Prevalence of Brucella pinnipediae in healthy hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) from the North Atlantic Ocean and ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51636
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2005 Jan 31;105(2):103-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2005
Author
Morten Tryland
Karen Kristine Sørensen
Jacques Godfroid
Author Affiliation
Section of Arctic Veterinary Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 6204, NO-9292 Tromsø, Norway. morten.tryland@veths.no
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2005 Jan 31;105(2):103-11
Date
Jan-31-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agglutination Tests - veterinary
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Atlantic Ocean
Brucella - genetics - growth & development
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Complement Fixation Tests - veterinary
DNA Transposable Elements - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - veterinary
Female
Lung - microbiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Prevalence
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Spleen - microbiology
Abstract
Investigations for Brucella-infections were conducted in 29 hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) caught between Svalbard and Greenland (North Atlantic Ocean; Greenland Sea) autumn 2002, and from 20 ringed seals (Phoca hispida) caught in Billefjord, Svalbard, spring 2003. All animals were apparently healthy and were caught in their natural habitat. Bacteriology on tissue samples from ringed seals was negative, whereas Brucella sp. were recovered in tissues from 11 of the 29 hooded seals (38%), with the highest tissue prevalence in spleen (9/29) and lung lymph nodes (9/24). Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in sera from 9 hooded seals (31%) (EDTA-modified Slow Agglutination test of Wright, Rose Bengal test, Complement Fixation Test, and Protein-A ELISA). The bacterial isolates all belonged to the genus Brucella according to classical biotyping and PCR analysis based on Insertion Sequence IS711, and were shown to be typical marine mammal strains, based on the occurrence of an IS711 element downstream of the bp26 gene. Their dependency on CO2 for growth, and the presence of one copy each of the omp2a and omp2b gene finally classified them as Brucella pinnipediae. Furthermore, all the hooded seal isolates showed an A+ M+ agglutination profile, which is different from the profile of reference seal strain 2/94 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina). Thus, these results indicate that B. pinnipediae may contain different biovars. The present results suggest that infection with B. pinnipediae is enzootic in this population. Since the hooded seal is commercially hunted and consumed in Norway, the pathological impact of such infections and their zoonotic potential should be further addressed.
PubMed ID
15627521 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Seal finger in Denmark diagnosed by PCR-technique].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127032
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Feb 13;174(7):426-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-2012
Author
Louise Charlotte Jansen
Ulrik Stenz Justesen
Signe Moeslund Roos
Rimtas Dargis
Jørgen Skov Jensen
Jens Jørgen Christensen
Michael Kemp
Author Affiliation
Afdeling for Mikrobiologisk Overvågning og Forskning, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark. louisejansen@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Feb 13;174(7):426-7
Date
Feb-13-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Denmark
Diagnosis, Differential
Finger Injuries - microbiology
Humans
Male
Mycoplasma - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Mycoplasma Infections - microbiology - transmission
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Wound Infection - microbiology
Abstract
Seal finger is an unusual infection in Denmark but is seen quite often in Greenland. A 69 year-old Danish man developed severe infection after cutting his finger on a sea urchin while handling a fishing net. Treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics had no effect. Standard culture from the lesion was negative. A Mycoplasma species was detected by PCR and DNA sequencing and subsequently cultured on special media. Specifically asked about exposure to sea mammals the patient could inform that a dead seal had also been trapped in the fishing net.
PubMed ID
22331047 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seroprevalence for Brucella spp. in Baltic ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and East Greenland harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294995
Source
Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2018 Apr; 198:14-18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Christian Sonne
Emilie Andersen-Ranberg
Elisabeth L Rajala
Jørgen S Agerholm
Eva Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Jean-Pierre Desforges
Igor Eulaers
Bjørn M Jenssen
Anders Koch
Aqqalu Rosing-Asvid
Ursula Siebert
Morten Tryland
Gert Mulvad
Tero Härkönen
Mario Acquarone
Erling S Nordøy
Rune Dietz
Ulf Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, P.O. Box 358, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. Electronic address: cs@bios.au.dk.
Source
Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2018 Apr; 198:14-18
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Brucella
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - veterinary
Female
Male
Phoca - microbiology
Pilot Projects
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Zoonotic infections transmitted from marine mammals to humans in the Baltic and European Arctic are of unknown significance, despite given considerable potential for transmission due to local hunt. Here we present results of an initial screening for Brucella spp. in Arctic and Baltic seal species. Baltic ringed seals (Pusa hispida, n?=?12) sampled in October 2015 and Greenland Sea harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus, n?=?6) and hooded seals (Cystophora cristata, n?=?3) sampled in March 2015 were serologically analysed for antibodies against Brucella spp. The serological analyses were performed using the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) followed by a confirmatory testing of RBT-positive samples by a competitive-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA). Two of the Baltic ringed seals (a juvenile male and a juvenile female) were seropositive thus indicating previous exposure to a Brucella spp. The findings indicate that ringed seals in the Baltic ecosystem may be exposed to and possibly infected by Brucella spp. No seropositive individuals were detected among the Greenland harp and hooded seals. Although our initial screening shows a zoonotic hazard to Baltic locals, a more in-depth epidemiological investigation is needed in order to determine the human risk associated with this.
PubMed ID
29571513 View in PubMed
Less detail

STREPTOCOCCUS PHOCAE IN MARINE MAMMALS OF NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC AND ARCTIC CANADA: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF 85 POSTMORTEM INVESTIGATIONS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295313
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):101-111
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Nicole D Taurisano
Brian P Butler
Diana Stone
Harry Hariharan
Paul J Fields
Hugh W Ferguson
Martin Haulena
Paul Cotrell
Ole Nielsen
Stephen Raverty
Author Affiliation
1 ? Department of Pathobiology, St. George's University, School of Veterinary Medicine, True Blue, St. George, Grenada, West Indies.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):101-111
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Female
Male
Otters - microbiology
Phocoena - microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Streptococcus - classification - isolation & purification
Abstract
: Streptococcus phocae is a pathogen of marine mammals, although its pathogenicity remains poorly understood. Recovery of this bacterium from asymptomatic carriers suggests that it is an opportunistic pathogen. We investigated the role of S. phocae in naturally occurring disease and its significance as a pathogen based on postmortem investigations. Between 2007 and 2012, 1,696 whole carcasses, tissue samples, or both were submitted from the northeastern Pacific and Arctic Canada for diagnostic testing. Streptococcus phocae was cultured from phocids ( n=66), otariids ( n=12), harbor porpoises ( Phocoena phocoena; n=5), and sea otters ( Enhydra lutris; n=2). Pathologic manifestations of S. phocae-associated disease included localized, as well as systemic, inflammatory lesions with common findings of suppurative bronchopneumonia ( n=17) and bacteremia ( n=27). Lung lesions were frequently culture-positive for S. phocae, suggesting commensal colonization of the oropharynx with subsequent opportunistic infection of the respiratory tract during tissue injury, coinfection, immunosuppression, or other debilitating conditions. The presence of a positive spleen culture, and interpretations at necropsy and histopathology, were used to determine the presence of S. phocae bacteremia. Less frequent lesions that were culture positive for S. phocae included abscesses ( n=9), meningitis ( n=7), and cellulitis ( n=1). The majority of cases with S. phocae lesions featured pre-existing conditions that presumably contributed to some degree of debilitation or immunosuppression, including emaciation ( n=29), liver mercury accumulation ( n=29), trauma ( n=22), severe pulmonary or cardiovascular nematodiasis ( n=9), concurrent bacterial or viral infections ( n=8), or sarcocystosis ( n=6). These findings suggest that S. phocae could be characterized as an opportunistic pathogen, associated with debilitating conditions in stranded and rehabilitating marine mammals. Wildlife investigators can use these results to draw more definitive conclusions regarding positive S. phocae cultures during postmortem studies in marine mammals.
PubMed ID
28982020 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.