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Arctic Ocean synthesis: analysis of climate change impacts in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas with strategies for future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297070
Source
184 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
December 2008
the total ice volume, and the extent of the sea ice (Fig. 1; Walsh 2008). Other changes in the physical environment in the Arctic shelf regions include increased river discharge, rising sea-level, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Changes in albedo (light reflectance) associated with
  1 document  
Author
Hopcroft, Russ
Bluhm, Bodil
Gradinger, Rolf
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Source
184 p.
Date
December 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3882185
Keywords
Chukchi Sea
Beaufort Sea
Sea ice
Coastal erosion
Permafrost
Sea level
Marine wildlife
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Assessment of the potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287905
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
...................................................................................................................7 2.3.6 Permafrost ..............................................................................................................8 2.3.7 Sea Levels ..............................................................................................................8 2.4 Climate Change Predictions for
  1 document  
Author
Yoder, Sarah
Author Affiliation
Alaska Section of Epidemiology
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Sea levels
Permafrost
Glaciers
Weather patterns
Sea ice
Temperature
Subsistence
Infectious disease
Sanitation
Health services
Abstract
Background: Over the past century, the air and water temperatures in Alaska have warmed considerably faster than in the rest of the United States. Because Alaska is the only Arctic state in the Nation, Alaskans are likely to face some climate change challenges that will be different than those encountered in other states. For example, permafrost currently underlies 80% of Alaska and provides a stable foundation for the physical infrastructure of many Alaska communities. As has already been seen in numerous villages, the groundcover that overlies permafrost is vulnerable to sinking or caving if the permafrost thaws, resulting in costly damage to physical infrastructure. The reliance on subsistence resources is another contrast to many other states. Many Alaskans depend upon subsistence harvests of fish and wildlife resources for food and to support their way of life. Some Alaskans report that the changing environment has already impacted their traditional practices. Many past efforts to characterize the potential impacts of climate change in Alaska have focused primarily on describing expected changes to the physical environment and the ecosystem, and less on describing how these changes, in addition to changes in animal and environmental health, could affect human health. Thus, a careful analysis of how climate change could affect the health of people living in Alaska is warranted. The Alaska Division of Public Health has conducted such an assessment using the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework; the assessment is based on the current National Climate Assessment (NCA) predictions for Alaska. The document is intended to provide a broad overview of the potential adverse human health impacts of climate change in Alaska and to present examples of adaptation strategies for communities to consider when planning their own response efforts. This document does not present a new model for climate change in Alaska, and it does not offer a critique of the NCA predictions for Alaska.
Documents

AssessmentofthePotentialHealthImpactsof.pdf

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Climate change in Point Hope, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296264
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
White Siikauraq “Martha” Whiting Charles Wohlforth Lloyd Vincent Kenji Yoshikawa Through adaptation, negative health effects can be prevented. Cover Art: Whale Bone Mask by Larry Adams TABLE OF CONTENTS Summary 1 Introduction 3 Community Profile 4 Temperature and Precipitation 7 Sea Level 11
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Rolin, Alicia
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6285714
Keywords
Alaska
Point Hope
Climate change
Sea level
Health web
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Water sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Point-Hope_0.pdf

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Earth's ice: Sea level, climate, and our future commitment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276025
Source
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2011 Jan;67(1):28-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Scambos, T
Source
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2011 Jan;67(1):28-40
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctica
Arctic
Climate change
Cryosphere
Global warming
Greenhouse gases
Greenland
Sea ice
Sea level rise
Abstract
The world's icy and snowy regions--the cryosphere--are where the most profound changes will occur as the globe continues warming. In many areas, the levels of cryospheric change today are surpassing any seen in the past hundreds to thousands of years. This amplified response has a simple explanation: Most of the cryosphere is, on average, near the freezing point. Small shifts in temperature push large regions to a different physical state. However, while the processes leading to the loss of ice are quickly started, they do not quickly stop. We are on the verge of committing ourselves to sizable increases in sea level. The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report estimated sea level rise in this century at just 20 to 60 centimeters, but that total did not include contributions from the break-up and flow of ice sheets. The melting of mountain glaciers and ice in Greenland and Antarctica could add an additional meter of sea level rise. An equally important effect may be the feedback that changes in ice--especially the ice-covered ocean--have on climate in both the polar and the temperate regions of the world. The author describes the processes that are rapidly eroding polar ice.
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IPCC Workshop on Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275990
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-2010
  1 website  
Author
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Antarctica
Glaciers
Greenland
Ice caps
Ice sheets
Observations
Projections
Sea level
Abstract
Sea level rise is one of the major long-term consequences of human-induced climate change. Future projections of sea level changes and their regional expression are of crucial importance for the sustainability of coastal settlements around the world. The Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC (AR4) had comprehensively assessed key processes contributing to past, present and future sea level changes. However, process understanding was limited and thus both size and uncertainties associated with some of these contributions remained still largely unknown. This also hampered the overall projections of global mean sea level rise in AR4. The future dynamical behaviour of the large polar ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland in a changing climate was identified as the primary origin of the large uncertainty in the AR4 projections of sea level rise for the 21st century. IPCC Working Group I (WGI) has acknowledged the relevance of this specific topic and thus (1) proposed a chapter on 'Sea Level Change' in its contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and (2) organized a targeted IPCC Workshop on 'Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities' very early in the assessment cycle for the IPCC's AR5. This Workshop took place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 21 to 24 June, 2010. The Workshop brought together experts from very diverse disciplines with a wide range of expertise, covering oceanography, ice sheet dynamics, glacier research and hydrology to discuss latest results from both observations and modelling relevant for sea level change. The workshop structure included a combination of plenary sessions with invited keynote presentations, group discussions, poster sessions and, finally, topical breakout groups. This Workshop Report contains a concise summary of the overall discussions and conclusions of the Workshop as well as summaries of the discussions in the breakout groups. It further includes the extended abstracts of the keynote presentations and poster abstracts presented during the Workshop.
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Source
Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no.11, pages 2237-2240.
Publication Type
Article
Date
June 1, 2001
GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 11, PAGES 2237-2240, JUNE 1, 2001 Sea level rise in the Arctic Ocean Andrey Proshutinsky Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA. Vladimir Pavlov Norsk Polar Institute, Tromso, Norway. Robert H. Bourke Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey
  1 document  
Author
Proshutinsky, Andrey
Pavlov, Vladimir
Bourke, Robert H.
Source
Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no.11, pages 2237-2240.
Date
June 1, 2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
211138
Keywords
Arctic Ocean
Sea level
Global warming
Wind stress
Thermohaline forcing and circulation
Abstract
About 60 tide-gauge stations in the Kara, Laptev, East-Siberian and Chukchi Seas have recorded the sea level change from the 1950s through 1990s. Over this 40-year period, most of these stations show a significant sea level rise (SLR). In light of global change, this SLR could be a manifestation of warming in the Arctic coupled with a de-crease of sea ice extent, warming of Atlantic waters, changes in the Arctic Ocean circulation, and an increase in coastal erosion and thawing of permafrost.
We have analyzed monthly mean sea level data and as-sessed the role that different factors may play in influencing the process of sea level change in the Arctic Ocean. Anal-ysis of the observational data and model results shows that changes in the patterns of wind-driven and thermohaline cir-culation may account for most of the increase of sea level in the Arctic Ocean and their cumulative action can explain more than 80% of the sea level variability during 1950-1990.
Documents

prosh-sea-level-rise.pdf

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University of Hawaii Sea Level Center (UHSLC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288568
Publication Type
Dataset
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Hawaii
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dataset
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Storms, Floods, Erosion, & Sea Level Rise
Oceanography
Climate
Research
Abstract
UHSLC collects, processes, analyzes, and distributes tide gauge data from around the world in support of climate and oceanographic research.
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Publication Type
Report
Date
2014 Sep
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
2014 Sep
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Arctic
Canada
Global security
Ice
Knowledge
Metabolism
Research
Sea level
Weather
Abstract
Often perceived as being remote and disconnected, the Arctic directly impacts the rest of the world. In this brochure, examples based on weather, security, research, health, and the environment demonstrate these close links. - See more at: http://www.arctic.gov/publications/brochures/wtam_broch.html#sthash.oKdJy35w.dpuf
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8 records – page 1 of 1.