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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bullying in school: evaluation and dissemination of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97326
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2010 Jan;80(1):124-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Dan Olweus
Susan P Limber
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2010 Jan;80(1):124-34
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression - psychology
Child
Diffusion of Innovation
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prevalence
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Schools - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
The nature and extent of bullying among school children is discussed, and recent attention to the phenomenon by researchers, the media, and policy makers is noted. The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) is a comprehensive, school-wide program that was designed to reduce bullying and achieve better peer relations among students in elementary, middle, and junior high school grades. Several large-scale studies from Norway are reviewed, which provide compelling evidence of the program's effectiveness in Norwegian schools. Studies that have evaluated the OBPP in diverse settings in the United States have not been uniformly consistent, but they have shown that the OBPP has had a positive impact on students' self-reported involvement in bullying and antisocial behavior. Efforts to disseminate the OBPP in Norway and the United States are discussed.
PubMed ID
20397997 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of the implementation of an educational curriculum: optimal interventions for the adoption of an educational program of health in elementary schools].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206816
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Sep-Oct;88(5):351-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Renaud
S. Chevalier
R. Dufour
J. O'Loughlin
N. Beaudet
A. Bourgeois
D. Ouellet
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique, Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal-Centre, Québec. renaudli@ere.umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Sep-Oct;88(5):351-3
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Curriculum
Health Education - methods
Humans
Primary Prevention
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
A multiple case study design is used to explain the level of implementation of a "Heart Health" curriculum by grade four teachers of eight schools in a Montreal multiethnic and underprivileged district. An interview and logbook examine the following variables: 1) personal characteristics of the teachers; 2) organizational characteristics of the schools; 3) characteristics of the program; 4) collaboration between the health and educational sectors; and 5) curriculum level of use and fidelity of implementation. The results show in particular that the personal characteristics of the teachers and the characteristics of the program explain the level of implementation of the Heart Health curriculum.
PubMed ID
9440997 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic requirements for work organization of full-day schools].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150413
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Mar-Apr;(2):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
M I Stepanova
Z I Sazaniuk
B Z Voronova
I E Aleksandrova
N O Berezina
E D Laponova
I P Lashneva
M A Polenova
A S Sedova
T V Shumkova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Mar-Apr;(2):47-52
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Welfare
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Program Evaluation
Russia
School Health Services - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
Physiological and hygienic studies under the conditions of a natural hygienic experiment were conducted to examine different variants of the organization of work of new types of general educational establishments--full-day schools. Over 580 pupils from 5 full-day schools were followed up. Organization of teaching children at full-day schools was found to mainly correspond to the age-related capabilities of pupils from primary and secondary classes. Of vital importance for maintenance of mental performance, good emotional and psychosomatic states are the organization of the intraschool environment, including a school plot, as well as the conditions for realization of additional education, motor activity of children, and recess. Health keeping in pupils from full-day schools is favored by the reduction in the duration of lessons to 35 minutes and day sleep for first-form children, the decrease in the number of pupils in a class, outdoor physical exercises in the middle of a school day (a primary school) and strolls after lessons, three meals a day, balanced additional education, medicopsychological accompaniment, optimization of studies and rest in children during a school year.
PubMed ID
19514287 View in PubMed
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The influence of school policies on smoking prevalence among students in grades 5-9, Canada, 2004-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140035
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2010 Nov;7(6):A129
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Chris Y Lovato
Allison W Pullman
Peter Halpin
Cornelia Zeisser
Candace I J Nykiforuk
Frankie Best
Alan Diener
Steve Manske
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Ave, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3. chris.lovato@ubc.ca
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2010 Nov;7(6):A129
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Male
Organizational Policy
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Schools - organization & administration
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
School characteristics may account for some of the variation in smoking prevalence among schools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between characteristics of school tobacco policies and school smoking prevalence. We also examined the relationship between these characteristics and individual smoking status.
Tobacco policy data were collected from schools in 10 Canadian provinces during the 2004-2005 school year. Written tobacco policies were collected from each school to examine policy intent, and school administrators were surveyed to assess policy enforcement. Students in grades 5 through 9 completed the Youth Smoking Survey to assess smoking behaviors and attitudes. We used negative binomial regression and multilevel logistic regression to predict the influence of school policies on smoking behavior at the school and student levels.
School policies that explicitly stated purpose and goals predicted lower prevalence of smoking at the school and individual levels. Policies that prohibited smoking on school grounds at all times predicted lower smoking prevalence at the school level but not at the individual level.
For maximum effectiveness, school smoking policies should clearly state a purpose and goals and should emphasize smoking prohibition. These policies can help reduce smoking prevalence among youths and are part of a comprehensive school approach to tobacco control.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Jul;79(7):857-622735472
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):214-815191135
Cites: Addiction. 1997 Sep;92(9):1165-739374015
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2005 Jun;33(3):325-3815957560
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Cites: Addiction. 2008 May;103(5):824-3118412761
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Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Dec 20;92(24):1979-9111121460
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2001 Jul;29(1):22-3011429302
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Mar;56(3):227-3211854347
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Cites: Health Promot Int. 2004 Jun;19(2):227-3415128714
Cites: Tob Control. 1996 Winter;5(4):286-919130362
PubMed ID
20950536 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):79-122
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Joel M Hektner
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):79-122
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
L3 is an intertribal residential school enrolling approximately 200 students in grades 5-8 from tribes in the northern Midwest. As a result of successful grant-writing which espoused Circle of Courage and Asset-Building, the school built up an impressive configuration of programs funded by a variety of sources, including a cadre of mental health professionals, and began increasingly to rely on their assessments and services. First funded by the Therapeutic Residential Model program in the 2002-2003 school year, L3 used the funding that year primarily to increase professional-level services of a psychiatrist and psychologist, and to maintain or expand programs which would otherwise have been terminated as funding from short-term sources was running out. Evaluation of this project began in January 2003, when the site was assessed and determined to be strongly oriented toward provision of Level Three, or professional-level, psychiatric and medical mental health services. The initial evaluation report identified a low retention rate and raised concerns that the presence of more than 200 staff on campus had resulted in a diffusion of responsibility, lack of consistency, and duplication or redundancy of services; that elements of the environment appeared to be detrimental to social development and emotional stability; and that an unusually high proportion of students were receiving psychiatric diagnoses and medication. The site was asked to address these issues, and additional funding was provided to bolster lower levels of triage by adding paraprofessional case managers to advocate or students and coordinate provision of services for them. Retention remained low at this site throughout the course of funding, and there were a high number of assaults and psychiatric hospitalizations compared with other sites.
PubMed ID
17602402 View in PubMed
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Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):17-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Philip S Hall
Judith A DeJong
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):17-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Faculty
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This site is an intertribal residential grant school annually enrolling over 250 students in grades 1-8 from tribes located in three states on the Northern Great Plains. From its inception in 1890, the boarding school's mission has been to provide services for young children in need of a safe and supportive living and learning environment. For over a decade, this site has used strategies centered on respecting children, structuring students' time, and providing the therapeutic benefits of a well-maintained campus. This site also has a long history of believing in each child's inherent value and potential. When Therapeutic Residential Model funding commenced at the midpoint of the 2002-2003 school year, L1 focused these new resources on strengthening and refining its program. The number of personnel positions increased from 98 to 135, with new positions principally going to dormitory staff and four Masters-level counselor positions. This increase in staff allowed L1 to proactively address the children's developmental needs. The site also adopted and implemented the Applied Humanism caregiving model. In accordance with Applied Humanism, an interview was utilized that allowed the site to identify and hire applicants possessing the attitudes and skills necessary to be good caregivers, existing staff were trained so that they understood the kind of caregiving that would be expected of them, supervision procedures and practices were implemented that supported and encouraged good caregivers and provided time-limited assistance to those who were not, and relevant agency policies and procedures were revised as needed to align with the Applied Humanism philosophy. In addition, the Morningside program was brought in to systematically address the students' academic lags in reading. The results of implementing the Therapeutic Residential Model were a reduction in behavioral incidents, a decrease in the amount of money spent on external mental health services, an increase in the retention rate, an increase in academic skills in selected areas, and higher scores on pre-post measures of adjustment, interpersonal relationships, and adaptability.
PubMed ID
17602400 View in PubMed
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Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):52-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Brad Spears
David Sanchez
Jane Bishop
Sharon Rogers
Judith A DeJong
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):52-78
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
L2, one of the original sites first funded under the Therapeutic Residential Model Initiative in 2001-2002, is operated as a peripheral dormitory. This dormitory cares for 185 boys and girls in grades 1-12 who attend local public schools. L2 presented an outstanding proposal which identified gaps in services and presented a reasonable budget to address those gaps by adding additional mental health services and increasing the number of residential and recreation staff. With only minor modifications to this budget, the site efficiently and effectively implemented the strategies it had proposed and utilized evaluation feedback to fine-tune systems and maximize positive outcomes. The Therapeutic Residential Model funds enabled the site to move from a functional dormitory to a therapeutic residential situation where the needs of students are assessed and addressed. Outcome indicators in spring 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 showed impacts in a number of areas when compared with the baseline year of 2000-2001: Retention of students steadily increased going from 40.7% in 2000-2001 to 68.4% in 2004-2005; 75 students graduated from high school during the four Therapeutic Residential Model years, compared with 41 in the preceding four years; Academic Proficiency and ACT scores improved significantly; Thirty-day cigarette use dropped from 62% in spring 2001 to 38% in spring 2005 among 7th and 8th graders, from 58% to 33% among 9th and 10th graders, and from 72% to 29% among 11th and 12th graders; Alienation indices showed an increase in feelings of inclusion and a decrease in lack of meaning. This site is an outstanding example of what can be done with a well-designed and responsibly implemented Therapeutic Model Program, and the measurable impacts which can result from such strategic use of resources.
PubMed ID
17602401 View in PubMed
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Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):152-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):152-76
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Day Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
At the No Treatment Day School, less than 15% of students used the dormitory during the school week. Located in the heart of a reservation and serving local students, the K-12 school enrolled over 1,000 students. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for the 2001-2002 school year. Initial evaluation of this site found an array of daunting problems throughout the school structure and functioning. There were some successes, including implementation of the Morningside reading program in the elementary school and some response from the community to the comprehensive evaluation report which provided an overview of the situation to policy-makers and community members. However instability in the system and a mid-year change in leadership complicated the process of implementation. By the end of the first year, it was clear that the feasibility of the original proposal was questionable and that an overhaul of the school's system and culture was necessary before a Therapeutic Residential Model could be implemented or significant change could come about. Therapeutic Residential Model funding was terminated at the end of the school year. As there was no substantial implementation of a Therapeutic Residential Model program, data gathered were utilized as representing a naturally occurring control or minimal treatment site.
PubMed ID
17602404 View in PubMed
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A pilot school-based healthy eating and physical activity intervention improves diet, food knowledge, and self-efficacy for native Canadian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172784
Source
J Nutr. 2005 Oct;135(10):2392-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Brit I Saksvig
Joel Gittelsohn
Stewart B Harris
Anthony J G Hanley
Tom W Valente
Bernard Zinman
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA. bsaksvig@umd.edu
Source
J Nutr. 2005 Oct;135(10):2392-8
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber
Eating
Education
Energy intake
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Motor Activity
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Psychology
Schools - organization & administration
Self Efficacy
Abstract
The Sandy Lake school-based diabetes prevention program is a culturally appropriate intervention for Ojibway-Cree students in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades. This paper reports the results of the program in changing dietary intake behaviors and related psychosocial factors. Physical activity results are not included. The study was a pretest/post-test, single-sample design conducted during the 1998-1999 school year. A total of 122 students completed all 4 measurements (anthropometry, 24-h dietary recall, and 2 questionnaires), at baseline and follow-up. There were significant increases (P
PubMed ID
16177202 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.