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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Being Facilitators in a Challenging Context-School Personnel's Experiences of Caring for Youth with Diabetes Type 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299151
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2018 Nov - Dec; 43:e114-e119
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Malin Rising Holmström
Marie Häggström
Siv Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden. Electronic address: malin.rising-holmstrom@miun.se.
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2018 Nov - Dec; 43:e114-e119
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Disease Management
Empathy
Female
Humans
Male
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
School Health Services - organization & administration
School Nursing - organization & administration
School Teachers - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to describe school personnel's experiences of caring for youth with diabetes type 1.
A qualitative design was chosen for this study. Data were collected with individual interviews that were subjected to inductive qualitative content analysis. The sample consisted of 24 school personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) from Swedish schools. All had experience with youth aged 6 to 18?years old with diabetes type 1.
School personnel experienced caring for youth with diabetes type 1 as "Being facilitators in a challenging context" and described establishing trusting relationships, finding strategies to support self-care, feeling uncertain and incapable in need of education, and dealing with unclear responsibility.
School personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) are key professionals supporting youth with diabetes type 1 and self-care in school. Lack of education and unclear responsibility created feelings of uncertainty and insecurity for school personnel and a need for mandatory education of school personnel regarding T1DM and self-care, including legislation was identified.
Mandatory education should be provided for all school personnel regarding diabetes type 1, self-care and current legislation. A liason position in form of a nurse specialist should manage the education.
PubMed ID
30100521 View in PubMed
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Building community health nursing in the People's Republic of China: a partnership between schools of nursing in Ottawa, Canada, and Tianjin, China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202181
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
N. Edwards
H. Bunn
W C Mei
Z D Hui
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. nedwards@zeus.med.uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
International Educational Exchange
Job Description
Ontario
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
Community health nursing in China is an emerging specialty. A multi-component collaborative endeavor between the Schools of Nursing of Tianjin Medical University, China, and the University of Ottawa, Canada is described. This project, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency, commenced in 1989. It has laid the groundwork for an expanded role for community health nurses in Tianjin, a municipality of 11 million people located in Northeast China. The historical context for the evolution of community health nursing in China and the emergence of community health nursing as a priority area within the project are described. Major project activities are highlighted, illustrating several underlying principles for strengthening the educational preparation of baccalaureate nurses who can apply community health skills. These include creating a critical mass of faculty who can teach community health nursing, modelling classroom and clinical teaching of community health nursing, bridging the gap between nursing in the community and nursing, in the hospital, and developing a prototype for baccalaureate community health nursing experience. Lessons learned from this initiative are summarized.
PubMed ID
10319665 View in PubMed
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Commentary: The case for national standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176588
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Nov;17(4):54-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Carole Orchard
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Nov;17(4):54-5
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - organization & administration
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Models, Educational
Needs Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Notes
Comment On: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Nov;17(4):41-5315656246
PubMed ID
15656247 View in PubMed
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Comparison of health-related quality of life among 10- to 12-year-old children with chronic illnesses and healthy children: the parents' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82193
Source
J Sch Nurs. 2006 Jun;22(3):178-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Svavarsdóttir Erla Kolbrún
Orlygsdóttir Brynja
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Reykjavík.
Source
J Sch Nurs. 2006 Jun;22(3):178-85
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Chronic Disease
Disabled Children - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Parent-Child Relations
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
School Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate mothers' and fathers' perception of their child's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 10- to 12-year-old Icelandic children with or without chronic health condition or illness. A total of 912 Icelandic parents (510 mothers and 402 fathers) and 480 children (209 boys and 271 girls) participated in the study. The Icelandic fathers of children who visited the school nurse over a period of 1 week perceived HRQOL of their children to be significantly lower than the mothers. A gender difference was found between the parents; mothers perceived their children to have significantly higher school functioning than fathers. Both mothers and fathers of children with chronic health condition/illness perceived their children to have significantly lower HRQOL than did the parents of children without a chronic health condition. The findings underline the importance for school nurses to develop and test interventions for school-age children with chronic health conditions or illnesses.
PubMed ID
16704288 View in PubMed
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[Cooperation between schools and adolescent psychiatric department from May 1973 to May 1978].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245936
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Mar 10;142(11):721-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1980

Cooperation with school nurses described by Finnish sixth graders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161189
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2007 Oct;13(5):304-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Tiina Mäenpää
Eija Paavilainen
Päivi Astedt-Kurki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2007 Oct;13(5):304-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Clinical Competence
Confidentiality
Cooperative Behavior
Counseling
Empathy
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Questionnaires
School Nursing - organization & administration
Social Support
Trust
Abstract
This paper deals with research on cooperation with the school nurse described by sixth graders. The data were collected via six focus group interviews in 2003-2004. Twenty-two sixth graders (aged 11-12 years) participated in the research. The data were analysed by the constant comparison method based on grounded theory. The analysis yielded a number of concepts that describe the basis of the cooperation: the trusted expertise of the school nurse, informative interaction with the family and knowing the family situation. The cooperation consisted of supporting the pupil's growth and development, need for individual counselling and supporting coping at school. The cooperation was characterized by an open atmosphere and friendliness, a low level of reciprocity, the school nurse's stereotyped activities and respect for the pupil's privacy. Pupils' experiences and perspectives can be used to develop more holistic strategies for the school health service.
PubMed ID
17883717 View in PubMed
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Cultural competence and cultural safety in Canadian schools of nursing: A mixed methods study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114295
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Rowan, MS
Rukholm, E
Bourque-Bearskin, L
Baker, C
Voyageur, E
Robitaille, A
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Rowan Research and Evaluation, Ottawa, ON, Canada. rowankeon@rogers.com
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Cultural Competency - education
Cultural Diversity
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Safety
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - education
Abstract
Cultural competence and cultural safety are essential knowledge in contemporary nursing care. Using a three-phase, mixed methods sequential triangulation design, this study examines the extent to which Anglophone Schools of Nursing in Canada have integrated cultural competence and/or cultural safety into the undergraduate nursing curricula. Factors that influence successful integration are identified through the lens of Donabedian's structure, process, and outcome model. Results suggest that several facilitating factors are present, such as leadership, partnerships and linkages, and educational supports for students. Of particular concern is the lack of policies to recruit and retain Aboriginal faculty, financial resources, and outcome evaluation indicators. A conceptual model of integration is offered to explain how Schools of Nursing function to support the implementation of these concepts into their curriculum. This study provides theoretical and practical implications for initiation and improvement of cultural competence and/or cultural safety integration strategies in Schools of Nursing.
PubMed ID
23629468 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.